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Healthcare Focuses on the Possibilities of Virtual Reality

Healthcare Focuses on the Possibilities of Virtual Reality | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
Healthcare providers see virtual reality technology as the next frontier in pain and stress treatment
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Can Blockchain Give Healthcare Payers Better Analytical Insight?

Can Blockchain Give Healthcare Payers Better Analytical Insight? | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
Payers may be among the first healthcare stakeholders to adopt blockchain as they look for ways to improve interoperability and manage patients.
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The Internet of Things is making hospitals more vulnerable to hackers | ZDNet

The Internet of Things is making hospitals more vulnerable to hackers | ZDNet | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
The attack potential grows exponentially as IoT technologies are implemented, warns European cyber security agency.
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How Can Wearable Technology Improve Cancer Treatment?

How Can Wearable Technology Improve Cancer Treatment? | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
Current cancer treatment is based on episodic encounters. Even during chemotherapy, patients generally see their physician for maybe eight to ten minutes every three weeks, said Peter Kuhn, ATOM-HP’s co-lead researcher and a professor of medicine, biomedical engineering, and aerospace and mechanical engineering at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.“The more than 30,000 minutes between visits are a missed opportunity,” Kuhn said. “Technology can be leveraged to fill this gap and provide a comprehensive picture. The collected data can lead to better treatment decisions, better survival rates, and better understanding between physician and patient.”
Via Alex Butler, Rémy TESTON, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, Today, 7:54 AM

Maybe not. Read "The mHealth App Gap"; http://sco.lt/8einD7 

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New AI Mental Health Tools Beat Human Doctors at Assessing Patients

New AI Mental Health Tools Beat Human Doctors at Assessing Patients | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
About 20 percent of youth in the United States live with a mental health condition, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

That’s the bad news.

The good news is that mental health professionals have smarter tools than ever before, with artificial intelligence-related technology coming to the forefront to help diagnose patients, often with much greater accuracy than humans.

A new study published in the journal Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, for example, showed that machine learning is up to 93 percent accurate in identifying a suicidal person. The research, led by John Pestian, a professor at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, involved 379 teenage patients from three area hospitals.

Each patient completed standardized behavioral rating scales and participated in a semi-structured interview, answering five open-ended questions such as "Are you angry?" to stimulate conversation, according to a press release from the university.

The researchers analyzed both verbal and non-verbal language from the data, then sent the information through a machine-learning algorithm that was able to determine with remarkable accuracy whether the person was suicidal, mentally ill but not suicidal, or neither.

“These computational approaches provide novel opportunities to apply technological innovations in suicide care and prevention, and it surely is needed,” Pentian says in the press release.

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Artificial Intelligence Could Dig Up Cures Buried Online

Artificial Intelligence Could Dig Up Cures Buried Online | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence could be a solution to science overload: machine learning assistants to read incoming papers, distill their information, and highlight relevant findings.
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Cures Law Passed: Health IT Interoperability Will No Longer Be Voluntary

Cures Law Passed: Health IT Interoperability Will No Longer Be Voluntary | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
The new 21st Century Cures Act is about to change healthcare IT interoperability, and most of the industry never saw it coming.
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Can this app help tackle the burden of diabetes?

Can this app help tackle the burden of diabetes? | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
A new app combines data, artificial intelligence technology, human interaction and psychology to beat diabetes.Glyco Leap is the flagship product of Singapore-based digital health startup Holmusk. The digital program combines different health tools such as a fitness tracker and glucometer, interactive coaching from certified dietitians and a mobile application to help people manage or reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.The app is yet another example of growing innovations in health care that makes use of mobile technology. Organizations, including big and small firms, are increasingly looking at the different ways they can use mobile tech as more people rely on their phones for daily needs such as shopping, booking a cab or fitness tracking.
Via Alex Butler
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Can Mental Health Apps Bring Therapy to a Wider Population?

Can Mental Health Apps Bring Therapy to a Wider Population? | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
Mental health apps offer therapeutic solutions at far more flexible price points, schedules, and platforms than traditional therapy.
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Visual analytics helps ambulance trust offer better service - Digital Health Age

Visual analytics helps ambulance trust offer better service - Digital Health Age | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
The South Central Ambulance Service NHS Foundation trust (SCAS) has announced that it is using systems from visual analytics company Qlik to improve services for patients.
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Arianna Huffington's new venture Thrive Global highlights Doctor on Demand and more in online store

Arianna Huffington's new venture Thrive Global highlights Doctor on Demand and more in online store | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
Arianna Huffington's new Thrive Global venture, which officially launched today, has selected Doctor on Demand as its primary partner for telehealth.
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Period tracking app Clue pulls in $20 million Series B from Nokia Growth Partners

Period tracking app Clue pulls in $20 million Series B from Nokia Growth Partners | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
Clue, an app built on machine learning to track a woman’s monthly menstrual cycle, announced it has raised $20 million in Series B funding today.The money comes from several investors with a focus in the healthcare space and was led by Nokia Growth Partners (NGP). Other participants in the round include existing investors Union Square Ventures, Mosaic Ventures, Brigitte Mohn and Christophe Maire. Giving Wings and Fabrice also participated as new investors in the round.
Via Alex Butler, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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What Banner Health and Philips learned from an outpatient telehealth program

What Banner Health and Philips learned from an outpatient telehealth program | Health Informatics | Scoop.it

Population health strategies have the benefit of advanced remote monitoring and telemedicine capabilities than in decades past, but to create a truly successful telehealth program you have to keep an open mind.

That is the message that Banner Health, an integrated, nonprofit health system based in Phoenix, Arizona, has taken to heart from its ongoing ambulatory care program for patients with chronic and complex diseases which is powered by Philip’s telemedicine platform. [...]

The program – named Intensive Ambulatory Care or Banner iCare — launched June 1, 2014, and the goal was to provide better care and reduce costs for the most complex patients – those with two or more chronic conditions — who happen to account for the highest cost in terms of healthcare dollars spent on their care.

Many population health programs focus on one chronic disease or another, but Dr. Hargobind Khurana, senior medical director of health management at Banner Health, said Banner’s approach was different.

“The idea was to say that there are complex, chronic patients who don’t have one chronic disease but have multiple chronic diseases and they have a hard time managing these diseases …these patients keep coming to the ED. They are in and out of the hospital,” he said in a recent interview. “Our goal was to be more broad than just one or two chronic diseases, so we focused on this aspect and said let’s find the high-utilizers who end up [repeatedly] in the hospital, in the ED.” [...]

But the population health strategy isn’t just high-tech. It is high-touch too.

“There’s a large team central team that’s dedicated for this work – health coaches that go to the patient’s home, there’s a social worker, there’s a pharmacist there are tele-nurses and there’s a physician who kind of helps coordinate their care,” Khurana explained.[...]

When the program launched, not enough patients who Banner felt could benefit were choosing to participate. The reason was simple: they didn’t want to switch their primary care providers as the program protocol required.

“We went in with this program thinking that what we would do is we would identify these patients and we’ll become their entire care team, so basically we would go to these patients and say, ‘We will become your primary care physician and we would also be the care team that would help with the telehealth platform,'” Khurana said. “Part of the lesson learned there was that patients were hesitant in the idea of leaving their PCP and entering a new entity.”

So Banner iCare pivoted. “So we changed that model about a year into it and told them, ‘You don’t have to leave your PCP. We will be an add-on to your care team. So you will have your PCP and you will work with them but we will be supporting your care as an addition to your PCP,’ ” he recalled. “That really helped the patients feel more comfortable joining my team, andI think that was a good learning.”

Changing the model based on feedback shows that in year two Banner Health was willing to take on the additional complication of keeping PCP’s apprised of any intervention they did to help the PCP’s patients. All without overwhelming the primary care doctor with raw data that was being transmitted through Philips’ telehealth platform.

Currently, about 500 patients are being cared for using the Banner iCare program and to date more than 1,000 have utilized the program. Khurana said people drop off when they move, change health plans, or die, adding that very few people leave the program because they didn’t like it.

Banner has seen some savings too.

The Banner iCare program has reduced the total cost of care per beneficiary by 27% per year. It has also reduced hospitalizations by 45%.

The program is ongoing, and Khurana believes that while they have hit upon an effective program, all the answers aren’t available yet.

For Philips, which codeveloped the program with Banner, there have been some important lessons too.

“We learned and showed that telehealth technologies can have a big impact on the care for patients dealing with multiple chronic conditions,” said Jeroen Tas, CEO of Philips Connected Care and Informatics, in an email. “We also learned that the process of integrating telehealth and other connected health solutions is a delicate one. It will only be successful if existing care pathways are redesigned. Change management and education are needed too as telehealth enables a more integrated and multidisciplinary care team approach than the traditional doctor-patient interaction.”

That traditional assumptions must be questioned was something that Banner Health also learned through the iCare program. And those assumptions center around who is a high-cost patient.[..]

“You can’t use retrospective costs or utilization data and assume that it would be the same in the future because it doesn’t account for the regression to the mean,” Khurana said, adding that just because some patients “had a bad year doesn’t mean that they are going to keep having bad years, year after year after year.”

In other words, the entire thinking about who is going to be an expensive patient in the future requiring coordinated care needs to be overhauled.

“We have to be smarter in building and developing more intelligent algorithms to identify patients who would be future high utilizers,” he said. “That will be the next focus of population health – to have better predictive analytics.”

 


Via rob halkes
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rob halkes's curator insight, December 1, 10:44 AM

Banner Health learned old assumptions must be put aside to develop a patient-centered telehealth program by harnessing home monitoring devices, tablets for video consults, all integrated and powered on Philips Healthcare's software.

Experience teaches that telemedicine and ehealth is an all encompassing effort: patient trust, medtech, mobile applications, but also the healthcare providers team must be adequately designed in order to gain trust AND to be effective. Design and development for implementation is as crucial as working tech and multidisciplinary coordination.
See here: for introduction to ehealth and for the ehealth thoughtlab

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How virtual reality can help you conquer your worst fears

How virtual reality can help you conquer your worst fears | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
Name your fear. A sense of dread strikes you at the thought of having to hop onto a crowded train. You squirm as the doctor approaches you with a needle. You tremble and tuck your head between your legs as the plane warms up its engine.
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What will be the first blockchain applications for pharma and healthcare?

What will be the first blockchain applications for pharma and healthcare? | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
Aside from patient data and electronic health records, there appears to be a more immediate need for blockchain technology to help pharma companies keep up with regulatory requirements.
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Mount Sinai, CityMD To Share EMRs for Faster Access to Patient Data

Mount Sinai, CityMD To Share EMRs for Faster Access to Patient Data | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
Mount Sinai Health Systemhas teamed up with urgent care provider CityMD to expand urgent care service throughout New York.
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Influence of Pokémon Go on Physical Activity: Study and Implications

Influence of Pokémon Go on Physical Activity: Study and Implications | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
Mobile apps combining game play with physical activity lead to substantial short-term activity increases and, in contrast to many existing interventions and mobile health apps, have the potential to reach activity-poor populations. Future studies are needed to investigate potential long-term effects of these applications.
Via Philippe Marchal, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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In five years, machine learning will be a part of every doctor’s job, Vic Gundotra says

In five years, machine learning will be a part of every doctor’s job, Vic Gundotra says | Health Informatics | Scoop.it

When Vic Gundotra left Google in 2014, he thought he might retire, forever. But a lingering interest in wearable technology and machine learning led him to AliveCor, which lets users monitor their heart health from their smartphones.

 

Diving back into the fray of tech, Gundotra is now convinced that the potential of wearables and machine learning is just starting to be unlocked. AliveCor’s portable EKG sensor, Kardia, alerts users if their heartbeats are irregular — and now, the Mayo Clinic, an AliveCor investor, has begun identifying other signals in an EKG reading that a human might miss.


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BioBeats Uses AI and Machine Learning to Combat Stress Epidemic

BioBeats, the leader in digital health and artificial intelligence, today announces that it has created a new proprietary algorithm that effectively estimates user stress level from physiological signals. BioBeats Hear and Now platform uses machine learning and AI to provide highly personalized stress monitoring and management tools for individuals as well as corporate wellness programs.
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Twitter: A Good Place to Detect Health Conditions

Twitter: A Good Place to Detect Health Conditions | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
With the proliferation of social networks and blogs, the Internet is increasingly being used to disseminate personal health information rather than just as a source of information. In this paper we exploit the wealth of user-generated data, available through the micro-blogging service Twitter, to estimate and track the incidence of health conditions in society. The method is based on two stages: we start by extracting possibly relevant tweets using a set of specially crafted regular expressions, and then classify these initial messages using machine learning methods. Furthermore, we selected relevant features to improve the results and the execution times. To test the method, we considered four health states or conditions, namely flu, depression, pregnancy and eating disorders, and two locations, Portugal and Spain. We present the results obtained and demonstrate that the detection results and the performance of the method are improved after feature selection. The results are promising, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve between 0.7 and 0.9, and f-measure values around 0.8 and 0.9. This fact indicates that such approach provides a feasible solution for measuring and tracking the evolution of health states within the society.

Via Giuseppe Fattori, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Breaking Down Barriers to Mental Health Care - Startupbootcamp

Breaking Down Barriers to Mental Health Care - Startupbootcamp | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
No one likes to feel alone. Yet, this is the exact feeling that the millions of people suffering from mental health problems experience on a daily basis. C
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Eye Robot: Meet the new virtual onsite trainers for hospitals

Eye Robot: Meet the new virtual onsite trainers for hospitals | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
From anywhere in the world, medical specialists can deliver their expertise through the virtual onsite trainer and personally train technicians in the room.
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GE, Boston Children's Partner to Develop App for Pediatric Brain Scans

GE, Boston Children's Partner to Develop App for Pediatric Brain Scans | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
Boston Children's Hospital and GE Healthcare has formed a partnership to develop digital tool that will improve diagnostic accuracy in pediatric brain scans
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Now your smartphone can even analyze sperm

Now your smartphone can even analyze sperm | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
If a couple is having difficulty conceiving a child, it's important that the man get a motility test done – it shows how active his sperm are. The problem is, a lot of guys feel awkward about going to a clinic and "providing a sample" on-site. That's where Medical Electronic Systems' YO system comes in. It lets users check their motility at home (or wherever else they feel inclined to do so) using their iPhone or Galaxy smartphone.

First of all, there are indeed other male fertility tests already on the market.

According to Medical Electronic Systems, however, these typically just measure the concentration of sperm in a semen sample. If all those sperm are poor swimmers, they're not going to do much good. YO goes a step farther, by indicating what percentage of them are actually moving, and doing so in a correct manner.

The hardware end of the system consists mainly of the YO Clip, a miniature microscope which is placed over the phone's camera lens. A semen sample is subsequently put on an accompanying slide via an included pipette, then inserted into the Clip. A free iOS/Android app on the phone analyzes that sample, providing an on-screen rating of its Motile Sperm Concentration – it also shows actual video of the sperm, so users can see for themselves just how motivated they are.

YO is available now for preorder, with delivery scheduled to begin in January. It's priced at US$49.95, which includes the Clip and two slides.

Source: YO

Via Wildcat2030
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Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, December 2, 3:19 AM

Smartphones can do anything these days.

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How digitising healthcare is helping the world's poorest

How digitising healthcare is helping the world's poorest | Health Informatics | Scoop.it
In a remote village on the island of Sumatra, a worried midwife uses her mobile to upload the latest blood pressure and temperature of one of her patients. Within minutes an obstetrics specialist in a hospital miles away is in touch. She’s arranging an intervention that will save the woman’s life – and that of her baby.Resting on a break from weeding, a Bangladeshi farmer checks his mobile. On the screen is a series of healthy living tips, and he makes a mental note to call a doctor when the day’s work is done.In Somaliland, a breakaway state in the north of strife-torn Somalia, a group of young doctors is gathered around a screen, talking to their peers in the NHS as they work to set up their country’s first national health service.
Via Alex Butler
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