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Flu Vaccines Can Make Influenza Worse

Flu Vaccines Can Make Influenza Worse | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it

As documented by a new study, getting a flu vaccination can result in coming down with a more virulent influenza. This phenomenon was noted during the swine flu pandemic-that-wasn’t a couple of years ago, but pooh-poohed by skeptics.

In the study[1] published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, pigs were given a universal flu vaccine of the type currently under development. They developed a more virulent form of influenza that readily turned into pneumonia when exposed to a strain similar to the variety used in the vaccine.


Via Ed Rybicki
shelbylaneMD's insight:

Listen to Dr. Eisenstein about getting a waiver. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbUsTUG59Yc

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Ed Rybicki's curator insight, September 1, 2013 3:15 AM

This is the phenomenon of "immune enahncement" - which is also, incidentally, responsible for people who have had dengue getting dengue haemorrhagic fever after getting infected with a related strain of virus, when the immunity to the first virus is not complete, or protective.

shelbylaneMD's curator insight, September 8, 2013 1:48 PM

Listen to Dr. Eisenstein aboutgetting your waiver. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbUsTUG59Yc

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Online Medical Marketing Misconceptions

Online Medical Marketing Misconceptions | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it

The internet has become an avenue for marketing for businesses in all fields, medical being just one. However, there are a variety of online medical marketing misconceptions that sometimes prevent practices from using this medium to its full potential. Here are some commononline medical marketing misconceptions that are unfounded and should be disregarded:

 

Traditional advertising is more effective. This is one of the most common misconceptions about online marketing for medical practices. The internet is one of the most widespread forms of communication, and using it can in fact be very effective. This is because it gives consumers your marketing message without imposing on them. Typically when a patient goes online to find a doctor, they’re doing it because they have a need. By putting your message in front of them online, you’re actually being much more effective than you would be if you simply printed an advertisement in a local paper. Online marketing is much more targeted than traditional in this way because the patient is actually approaching you for information rather than the other way around.

 

I will get in trouble with privacy laws. Doctors do have to be careful about privacy laws when advertising or marketing, however these laws can easily be upheld online. Online marketing does not mean that you have to include any kind of patient information or other protected information in order to be effective. Just like with traditional marketing tactics, you can use online marketing to lawfully market your practice.

 

Online marketing is too time-consuming. It’s true that online marketing requires more upkeep than a traditional advertisement would. But with how much more effective online marketing is, it’s a worthwhile investment. Too, you don’t need to be the one physically doing the work. There are online marketing specialists available to handle your social media, blogging and optimization needs so that you can focus on providing your patients with quality service.

 

Put these online medical marketing misconceptions behind you so that you can have a growing medical practice. If you’re interested in finding out how online marketing can help your practice grow, contact the Social Jeanie today to get started.


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95 Great Health and Wellness Experts to Follow on Twitter - eKneewalker

95 Great Health and Wellness Experts to Follow on Twitter - eKneewalker | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it
The Internet is so full of health advice it's hard to know where to start. Here's our 95 health and wellness experts we think you should follow on Twitter.
shelbylaneMD's insight:

Guess who made the cut.  Check out the experts in Health, wellness & Longevity  ..Ta Dah.

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Play, don't replay! HELP PREVENT PTSD

Play, don't replay! HELP PREVENT PTSD | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it
Please join our effort to help prevent post-traumatic stress disorder by learning and sharing this simple technique: If you experience or witness a trauma, play a pattern-matching videogame such as...
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Doctors To Suspend Patients Between Life And Death

Doctors To Suspend Patients Between Life And Death | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it
Surgeons in Pennsylvania are expected to make history next month when they begin testing a technique that suspends trauma patients in a state between life and death.

The groundbreaking technique known as “suspended animation” could sa...
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The Buzz Launch is Rollin. Are You In?

The Buzz Launch is Rollin. Are You In? | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it
Lock-In Now For One Of The Most Anticipated Launches In History
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 What is the difference between Marijuana & Hemp?

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unm024ymnMY 

 

What is the science of hemp and healing?

 

www.MyCBDResearch.com

 

www.CBD4Us.com

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The Buzz Launch is Rollin. Are You In?

The Buzz Launch is Rollin. Are You In? | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it
Lock-In Now For One Of The Most Anticipated Launches In History
shelbylaneMD's insight:

What is the difference between Marijuana  & Hemp, and healing?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unm024ymnMY 

 

Here are 2 websites with the science.

 

www.MyCBDResearch.com

 

www.CBD4Us.com

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Infographic: 21 Facts That Will Change Your Relationship Forever

Infographic: 21 Facts That Will Change Your Relationship Forever | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it
Discover what scientists know about happy couples, and your relationship will never be the same--guaranteed.
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Let's start a grassroots physician social media movement

Let's start a grassroots physician social media movement | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it

It is hard to teach an old dog new tricks.


No where is this more apparent than working to get physicians to understand the potential of social media for their practice.  The adoption of social media by doctors — even something as relatively simple as Twitter, is tough.


Face it:  Thinking that a re-tweeting of how much we want more doctors on Twitter by next year is just preaching to the social media choir.  After all, those on social media are already supporters.  How do we get physicians who are not on social media to understand its potential value to them?


This is not a simple undertaking.  Doctors are being forced to spend more computer screen time than they ever wanted to thanks to the mandatory documentation requirements of electronic medical records.  What physician also wants to spend even more time glued to a computer screen — or cell phone — texting little tidbits to Twitter, posting pictures to Facebook, or browsing Pinterest photos?


Please.


For doctors to accept social media, they have to understand its value to them.  There’s only one way I know to do that: demonstrate it to them.

Those of us who are believers have to show them a well-organized RSS feed reader containing journal articles and news reports they’re want to say up up to date with and likely read.  We have to show them how to use social media to collaborate (in near real-time) with colleagues to write an article or crowd-source a talk.  We need to show them the contacts — many who they’d recognize — you’ve made around the globe.  Show them how they can lurk and get the information they need without having to expose themselves to any potential legal issues.  We should show new graduating residents and fellows how they can stay in touch with their professors so they can continue to tap their network for answers to difficult clinical questions and get a rapid response.


And if all else fails: we must show them how they can stay in touch with their kids once they leave their homes.


Then, slowly, one-by-one, a grassroots physician social media movement can begin.  Otherwise, we’ll just be preaching to our same old physician social media circle.


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EXPOSED: Angelina Jolie part of a clever corporate scheme to protect BRCA gene patents (opinion) - NaturalNews.tv

EXPOSED: Angelina Jolie part of a clever corporate scheme to protect BRCA gene patents (opinion) - NaturalNews.tv | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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How Chronic Disease Starts in the Mouth - NaturalNews.tv

How Chronic Disease Starts in the Mouth - NaturalNews.tv | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it

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Digital Doctor Vs. Social Doctor

A digital and social doctor uses digital tools for effective social communications with peers, and with patients!

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HealthCare.gov website security was at 'high risk' before launching

HealthCare.gov website security was at 'high risk' before launching | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it
A government memorandum signed off on by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid services administrator Marilyn Tavenner reveals that she allowed HealthCare.gov to launch without final security testing.
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Molecular Autopsies: evaluating cause of death for young victims of Sudden Cardiac Death

Molecular Autopsies:  evaluating cause of death for young victims of Sudden Cardiac Death | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it
Each year, tens of thousands of young people worldwide die suddenly after their hearts stop beating for no apparent reason.

 

Up to half of sudden so-called 'autopsy negative' deaths leave grieving family members without a resolution—and without the knowledge that they, too, could be at risk for the same type of outcome. Unlike death from coronary artery disease, which leaves physical clues in the heart, many deaths from inherited rhythm disorders leave behind a heart that looks normal in every respect. Sometimes, the only telltale marks dwell in the genetic code.But what sounds like a simple solution—genetic testing of the dead—isn't so easy. Even though molecular analyses offer a plausible cause of death for up to one-third of autopsy-negative cases in people under 40, such forensic medicine is rarely performed. There's no standardized autopsy procedure in such deaths; there's no centralized database of mutations for inherited heart problems; and there's no payer reimbursement for post-mortem genetic investigations. In many countries, health insurance coverage simply ends when the heart stops beating.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, November 8, 2013 8:31 AM

The unresolved grief for families not knowing the casue of death fro loved ones who die suddenly is a real problem.  AUtopsies are not covered and done infrequently because of cost.  thsi attractive option of a "molecular autopsy" from blood taken after death seems like a good solution both for grieivng families and from a public health standpoint.

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Online Reputation: How Physicians Should Deal With Online Rating Websites

Online Reputation: How Physicians Should Deal With Online Rating Websites | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it

Physicians can ill-afford to ignore what patients are writing about them online. But the simple fact is – constantly monitoring rating and review websites can consume a lot of your already limited time and energy. Some physicians might be panicky that they will confront adverse comments about their practice and hence shun rating websites.

But experts suggest that physicians should be aware of the online ratings and reviews from patients to correct themselves. Continually ignoring rating websites can spell disaster in the long run. The more aware you are of what patients are writing about you, the more able you will be to improve your online reputation.

Surveys reveal that 50 percent of new patients point to online reviews and rating sites, such as Yelp and ZocDoc, as their referral sources. Thus, it is clear that online ratings and reviews are playing a bigger role in your ability to attract new patients.

Again, surveys reveal that 56 percent of patients considered online ratings as important when choosing a new doctor; and nearly 25 percent had actively sought out physician ratings when choosing their primary-care physicians.

Another survey, conducted by healthcare technology company Digital Assent in 2013, found that 72 percent of 341 respondents said that adverse reviews would forbid them from consulting a particular doctor.

Given the growing popularity of online ratings and reviews of physicians, it’s time doctors took a more active role in managing their online reputation. Make sure the first impression you give online is just as excellent as the one you may give in person.

Of course, there is a general complaint from the medical fraternity. They claim that these ratings are subjective and largely based on measures not directly in the doctor’s control! For instance, patients are asked to rate doctors on many nonclinical criteria such as waiting time, behavior of paramedical staff, rapport, and patient satisfaction.

Physicians will have to necessarily pay attention to rating sites as any low rating would mean patients will turn away. Web-based physician-rating sites are rapidly expanding in number and scope.

Web-based physician-rating sites should be seen as part of a paradigm shift in the relationship between physicians and patients. In the present era of consumerism, doctors are removed fro their high pedestal, and power has shifted to the hands of the patients

 


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Janna Lusk's curator insight, July 18, 6:43 PM

Physicians are often wrapped up in the healthcare they provide, and thus, are less likely to know how to handle online ratings. An emotional reaction to public reviews is the kiss of death, but you can't ignore them, either.

 

Physicians, you are small business owners, just like anyone else. Educate yourselves in business, run a tight ship, and make sure every staff member is connected with the patients. Once the reviews are posted, thank each person for their feedback and for giving an honest opinion. That will earn more trust than anything.

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Global TV sorry after some viewers hear laughter but no jokes in SNL audio flub - 680 News

Global TV sorry after some viewers hear laughter but no jokes in SNL audio flub - 680 News | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it
Global TV sorry after some viewers hear laughter but no jokes in SNL audio flub 680 News Several irate viewers vented on Twitter after they tuned in to watch host Louis C.K.'s opening monologue and heard the live crowd's laughter but not the...
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Medicare Panel Urges Cuts to Hospital Payments for Services Doctors Offer for Less

Medicare Panel Urges Cuts to Hospital Payments for Services Doctors Offer for Less | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it
A Medicare payment-advisory panel said Friday that Congress should move to cut payments to hospitals for many services that can be provided at lower cost in doctors’ offices.
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The Buzz Launch is Rollin. Are You In?

The Buzz Launch is Rollin. Are You In? | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it
Lock-In Now For One Of The Most Anticipated Launches In History
shelbylaneMD's insight:

Hemp,  Health & Healing....

 

What is the difference between Marijuana & Hemp?

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unm024ymnMY 

 

What is the science of hemp and healing?

 

www.MyCBDResearch.com

 

www.CBD4Us.com

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Doctors on Twitter: Worldwide growth mapped, 2006-2014 - YouTube

Video maps growth in doctors, nurses and healthcare professionals using Twitter since its launch in 2006 to 2014. Data sourced using Creation Pinpoint, the w...

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Medscape Physician Lifestyle Report 2014

This Medscape lifestyle survey explores whether physicians have healthier diets and weights than their patients, and also looks at their responses on vacations, politics, religion, and marriages.
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Are doctors really healthier than their patients.???

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Five healthcare innovations to get excited about

Five healthcare innovations to get excited about | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it

With Canada’s aging population, the fact that about 40 percent of women could develop cancer in their lifetimes, and that heart disease and stroke are among the leading causes of death in women, it’s likely that many Canadian women will require medical treatment at some point in their lives.

Given this critical need, hospitals in Canada are quickly becoming the most innovative in the world. Many are being designed to provide patients with access to faster and better-quality care while others allow patients to take more control over their own health care needs. Here are 10 innovations you can get excited about:

1. Mobile health careSmartphones and tablets make it easy to monitor health care information on the go. Count calories, track physical activity, calculate body mass index (BMI) and ask medical questions.

Try it for yourself: Bant is an app developed in Canada that simplifies diabetes management for patients.

2. Social mediaUsed by patients to share health care information, new support sites let people connect with others undergoing similar experiences, to share advice and provide comfort and encouragement.

Try it for yourself:CancerConnection.ca allows anyone dealing, either directly or indirectly, with cancer to share their experiences and build supportive relationships.

DiabetesCareCommunity.ca is Canada’s first social network and online resource for families and friends of people with diabetes.

YoungAdultCancerCanada.ca is an online information and support resource that uses social media to connect young people diagnosed with cancer.

3. Bedside technologyHospital rooms are going high-tech with new interactive patient portals providing communication, education and entertainment—patients can contact nurses and order meals, learn more about their condition, as well as access TV shows and movies.

Toronto’s Humber River Hospital, opening in 2015, will be North America’s first fully digital hospital. Using the latest technologies to put patients and families at the centre of their care, the hospital will have online registration and electronic health records and bedside room-environment control.

4. Point-of-care diagnosticsLab tests are critical in diagnosis and monitoring of patients with acute and chronic diseases. These tests are largely done in central laboratories in hospitals or reference laboratories. Advances in point-of-care testing (PoCT) technologies allow for some of the routine tests (such as blood sugar and certain other critical tests) to be run outside of the laboratory quickly, often with just a few drops of the patient’s blood. These tests offer the convenience of fast and reliable results. PoCT programs allow for faster assessment and monitoring of patients, and improve patient care.

National Research Corporation Canada has developed a Point-of-Care app that allows health care leaders making hospital rounds to deliver real-time data and reports to other departments so patient issues are resolved quickly. This leads to a better experience for patients.

5. Virtual visitsRemote monitoring of patients allows for virtual visits to be conducted by teleconference or video conference – a specialist from across the country can examine a patient and give a diagnosis, saving the time and high cost of travel.

Try it yourself: Ontario Telemedicine Network is the world leader in telemedicine, using innovative technology to streamline health care processes, while also expanding the way knowledge is shared and how the medical community interacts with each other and with patients.


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Must-See TV: Health Plans Voluntarily Extend Payment Deadlines | AHIP Coverage

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Fluoridation's Shocking History - Video 6min

Fluoridation's Shocking History - Video 6min | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it

How did the thought that ingesting fluoride would benefit oral and dental health actually start? Professor Paul Connett describes how and why water fluoridation started in the USA. 

 

He points out the flaws in the reasoning behind a push for fluoridation, and the lack of actual studies to ascertain the effects of fluoride in drinking water.

 

There are many concerns about continued fluoridation. Studies in countries with high natural levels of fluoride in their water find negative effects and all that is being done is to criticize the methodology of those studies...


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, December 30, 2013 6:46 AM

If your water is being fluoridated, you should be concerned...

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Use of Social Media in Public Health teaching: 5 reasons why and some words of caution.

Use of Social Media in Public Health teaching: 5 reasons why and some words of caution. | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it

The use of social media has increased dramatically over the last decade.  Sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn have allowed the rapid communication of ideas and news around the world at fast speeds.  Recent estimates suggest that over 90% of young adults have some type of online presence, weather it is in the form of a Facebook page, and/or Twitter or LinkedIn account.  Moreover, it is estimated that over 80% of 25-34 year olds browse the World Wide Web regularly, with 50% of these accessing the Web from a mobile device.  This presents a great opportunity for educators, especially in the Public Health arena, to interact and engage students in a field that is rapidly changing and depends on timely information to make decisions, which may have a potential effect in the population as a whole.


The “theory of student involvement” (1) promotes the interaction of students’ with peers and faculty alike, in order to have the most positive academic experience while pursuing a college degree.  Hence, considering our students are changing the way they connect with each other and the “world”, we as Public Health educators, should consider utilizing some of these technologies to further engage our students and allow them to have “some control” about the information they learn and share, of course, without sacrificing the core pillars of any academic program.


Over the last year, I have become involved in the utilization of social media in the classroom, and consider there are five important components why it can be useful in any Public Health classroom:

 

1.      Breaking news in Public Health

Considering the importance of “time” in the management of any disease, utilizing social media to follow leading institutions such as the National Health Service in the UK, or the Center for Disease Control in the US, will keep students informed of ‘news’, which can later serve as a topic of discussion in classroom, or ‘online’, as a student can pose questions and receive immediate feedback from instructor, peers, or even the leading authorities in those organizations.  Thus, social media can be used as a way to disseminate content and course specific information.

 

2.      Theme specific live-chats

In an environment where allocation of traveling resources may be scarce, social media presents an opportunity for all students to virtually travel to any part of the world, while seating at their desks.  The biggest “hurdle”, if any, is to follow the right organizations.  Today, search algorithms make it easy to utilize these sites and learn more about any topic.

 

3.      Develop an community outside the classroom

The utilization of social media can create an “outside the classroom environment”, in which students remain engaged in a topic before, during or even after the class has ended.  Moreover, some students may be more comfortable sharing their opinions in a Social Media platform than in the classroom; hence, encouraging all students to participate in the dialogue.

 

4.      Interact with world-renown Public Health practitioners

Aside from meeting world-renowned practitioners at international conferences around the world, which could be very expensive for faculty and almost impossible for students, social media presents an opportunity to reach out to professionals around the world and interact with them in a “live” environment, which could enhance participation and involvement by students in any course.

 

5.      Meet other students/professionals in the field

Although meeting world-renown practitioners is exciting, reaching out to other professionals, or other students in the field enhances the collaborative nature of public health and encourages learning from others in the field.  Additionally, these interactions can create possibilities for internships, additional graduate and post-graduation work, and even potential jobs.

 

Although Social Media can be a great tool for the classroom, there are a couple of issues that need to be address for a productive implementation:

 

1.      Equipment needs

Unfortunately, even though students around the world commonly use Social Media often, it may be difficult for some students to actively engage in class discussions, etc., due to a lack of a mobile device.  Some may only have laptops, or even desktops, which limit the utilization of this technology.  Thus, instructors should be aware of this limitation when “requiring” its use in the Public Health classroom.

 

2.      Privacy

Although Internet privacy is a big issue these days, it should made clear to ALL students that professional and personal accounts should not be combined.  As young professionals, they each need to work on their “online presence” and the last thing they want to do is to meet a world-renowned epidemiologist who knows what they did Saturday night!  I believe here is where instructors need to pay more attention and have strict guidelines for proper utilization.

 

As social media continues to gain popularity among our society, public health instructors should consider utilizing these technologies to promote student engagement both in and outside the classroom.  These technologies could maximizing those “teachable moments” in public health, which usually occur outside of the classroom when students are going about their day and see/do something that reminds them of what they discussed in class the week before!  Personally, I think we should stop trying to analyze how and why students are currently using social media; instead, we should focus how WE want them to use it in our classrooms, so that they can become better practitioners and public health professionals.


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Bonnie McEwan's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:11 PM

A collegep prof talks about using social media in the teaching of health.

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2014: the year of the empowered patient…and physician? - What’s next

2014: the year of the empowered patient…and physician? - What’s next | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it

As the healthcare industry evolves, physicians find themselves with less and less time to spend with patients. As a result, voice-enabled mHealth apps, such as AskMD and Sense.ly, are emerging to empower patients and enable them to take a more active role in their own health and well-being.


The latest estimates suggest that new physicians only have about eight minutes to spend with each patient.  Today, much of their time is being devoted to “punching below their weight.”  In other words, while time focused on patient care wanes, resources and efforts devoted to things like paperwork (albeit digital paperwork) are on the rise as physicians are forced to shoulder growing regulatory demands while also driving toward the creation of a“learning” healthcare system.


Intelligent systems have the ability to not only interact on a human level, but also understand and reason to deliver a desired outcome – such as finding and instantly playing a movie or, from a more clinical perspective, giving physicians easy access to data locked within the electronic health record (EHR).


Helping physicians make the most of their time with the patient

For physicians, intelligent systems come in the form of natural, conversational and intuitive technologies that break down IT barriers that sit between the physician and the patient – getting technology to work for doctors, rather than against them.  Intelligent systems help doctors address ever-changing technological shifts in order to get them back to the bedside practicing the art of medicine, despite increased demands on their time and resources.


Giving patients the tools to more actively engage in proactive care

In addition to streamlining administrative duties and easing the burden of the shift to digital care for physicians, we need patients to become more engaged in order to truly increase the value of care and drive down costs.  A critical component to empowering patients is arming them with intelligent systems of their own that allow them to access information on-the-go in order to gain initial insights on symptoms and care treatments so that they can make the most of the eight minutes with their physician.


more at http://whatsnext.nuance.com/2014-year-empowered-patientand-physician/


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Shyam Kumar Chaturvedi's curator insight, December 16, 2013 10:14 PM

As the healthcare industry evolves, physicians find themselves with less and less time to spend with patients. As a result, voice-enabled mHealth apps, such as AskMD and Sense.ly, are emerging to empower patients and enable them to take a more active role in their own health and well-being.

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5 design flaws of HealthCare.gov

5 design flaws of HealthCare.gov | health care &  health politics & infographics | Scoop.it
Amid the government shutdown and partisan games plaguing Washington, D.C., and the rest of the country, something is actually happening--online signups for the Affordable Care Act. HealthCare.gov is finally open for business, but how well...
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