Health Information Technology Concierge
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Health Information Technology Concierge
HIT Concierge makes visible answers to questions and solutions to problems regarding mHealth, "meaningful use" and patient engagement.
Curated by Kel Mohror
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HIT Concierge Table of Contents

Scoops are listed as they appear by column

Kel Mohror's insight:

--Cefaly TENS Device May Relieve Migraine Pain

--Plasmonic Cuvette Detects Glucose in Saliva

--Acute & Chronic Pain Relief (including fibromyalgis) Delivered by FDA-cleared Device

--Migraine Pain May be Eliminated by FDA-cleared Device

--Freedom for Diabetics as Bionic Pancreas Passes Testing

--Sewing Machine Hacked Into Printer for Flexible Electronics

--iHealth Align, World's Smallest FDA Cleared Glucometer

--Examples of MMAs the FDA Has Cleared or Approved

--Google's smart contact lenses could help diabetics monitor their glucose levels

--[INFOGRAPHIC] M-Health Physician Use of Mobile Technology

--Smartphone photography to diagnose eye disease

--Need a Moore’s Law for Medicine

--New Concerns on Robotic Surgeries

--Fitness-focused Samsung smartwatch, Galaxy Gear

--Drones Deliver Defibrillators

--After Watson, IBM building 'Brain in a Box'

--Infographic:Is mHealth the Future of Healthcare?

--Kenya: Doctors Prevent Blindness With 'Revolutionary' Phone APP

--Baby cry analyzer, diaper analyzer

--Ten-minute brain scan for concussion evaluation

--Neurology study for stroke assessment

--Two Irish firms revolutionising medical device development

--Scanadu SCOUT "tricorder" earns additional funding

--Price Waterhouse and Coopers comphrehensive mHealth pages

--Marshfield free Heart Health Mobile

--Triple-purpose sensor measures vital heart, muscle and brain waves

--Second In-flight use of Smartphone Heart App

--AliveCor Heart Monitor Used in the Second In-flight Incident

--Mobile Health Apps Arrive

--IT Powers Effective Stroke Care

--Video about the Smartphone Physical process

--No input from doctors for most pain apps

--Survey of mobile apps use

--Physicians welcome patient self-tracking

--Smartphone physical debuting at TEDMED 2013

--Video "The Doctor Weighs In" (glimpses of mHealth)

--BYOD Trend to Explode [Bring Your Own Device]

--This Week in Health Innovation and The Coming Mobile Health Startup Revolution

--Xerox Digital Nurse Assistant
--Health, wellness wireless sensor networks worth
--Benefits | ViSi Mobile
--Kaiser Permanente Is Seen
--Making it Real: A Physician’s Pathway
--Video Meaningful Yoose Rap
--Bluetooth health monitoring
--The LIVESTRONG Foundation’s Approach to Patient Engagement
--Rise of app development, device use
--NC Health Literacy [North Carolina]
--CFAH Engagement Behavior Framework
--Future of Mobile Health
--Tool Aims To Eliminate Readmissions
--Health IT Bubble
--EHR Meets MDDS
--Wearable mHealth device shipments
--ER Visit Costs

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Plasmonic Cuvette Detects Glucose in Saliva, May Lead to Blood-Free Testing for Diabetics

Plasmonic Cuvette Detects Glucose in Saliva, May Lead to Blood-Free Testing for Diabetics | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it

Any diabetic will tell you that there has to be a better way than doing finger pricks for blood glucose testing. Researchers at Brown University ...

Kel Mohror's insight:

... are developing a sensor that would enable sampling of saliva for glucose testing. The sensor relies on plasmonic interferometry, a light-based way of detecting chemical compounds, and a dual-enzyme assay that works as a dye, to mark glucose."


"The researched dubbed their sensor “plasmonic cuvette” and they believe it can identify a variety of interesting biomolecules within complex solutions such as bodily fluids."

 

"Real-time glucose monitoring in saliva is achieved by performing a detailed study of the underlying enzyme-driven reactions to determine and tune the effective rate constants in order to reduce the overall assay reaction time to ∼2 min."

 

[ Integrate this with a smartphone app (and perhaps a microfluidics "genonme sequencer on-a-chip") to ID markers for systemic inflammation, dimentias, heart disease, cancers and other conditions.]

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Freedom for Diabetics as Bionic Pancreas Passes Testing

Freedom for Diabetics as Bionic Pancreas Passes Testing | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Stanley Baker can’t remember feeling quite so free in a very long time.
Kel Mohror's insight:

52 people age 12 and older with Type 1 diabetes who for five days tested in real-world settings a “bionic” pancreas, designed to take over the job of providing insulin on a minute-by-minute basis when the body’s real organ fails.

 

One participant, Stanley Baker, proclaimed- “This totally relieves you of managing the diabetes,” he said. “It was extremely liberating.”

 

The mechanical device worn outside the body, has these "off-the-shelf" components

--glucose monitor from Dexcom Inc. (DXCM)

--two pumps from Tandem Diabetes Care Inc. (TNDM) and

--an iPhone .

 

[ If a person wants to improve the economy and the quality of life in the U.S. (and by extending capitalism, the world) s/he must earn a high school diploma, then buckly down and learn how to design things that *solve* real-world problems. 'Tis not easy, but the effort leads to success and a rewarding life. ]

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iHealth Align, World's Smallest FDA Cleared Glucometer, Now Available in U.S.

iHealth Align, World's Smallest FDA Cleared Glucometer, Now Available in U.S. | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
  iHealth Lab, part of China-based Andon Health, has received FDA clearance and is launching its iHealth Align blood glucose monitor in the U.S. This
Kel Mohror's insight:

This is the smallest FDA cleared glucometer, but it requires an Android or iOS device to take readings. The device is plugged into the 3.5 mm headphone jack of your phone/tablet and from there it’s operated pretty much like any other glucometer, with all the interaction done through the phone/tablet’s touchscreen. The device will  be sold for $17.


iHealth’s Gluco-Smart app is used to store glucose readings and insulin injections, and to retrieve historic data to check on one’s ability to maintain healthy blood glucose levels. The app also uploads all the data to the “cloud” where it can be accessed by the person’s doctor, caretaker, or anyone else that has an access.


[So if the vendor is China-based, are the "cloud" servers also in China? Even if Andon Health claims 100% HIPAA compliance, how confident can a person be the data is truly "private and secure"?]

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Google's smart contact lenses could help diabetics monitor their glucose levels

Google's smart contact lenses could help diabetics monitor their glucose levels | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Google's smart contact lenses could help diabetics monitor their glucose levels
Kel Mohror's insight:

--The "smart contact lenses" measure glucose levels in tears using a microchip embedded in the contact.

 

--The glucose data is transmitted  to a

    --mobile device or

    --.cellphone-sized pump on a diabetic's hip having a flexible tube implanted in the stomach to shoot rapid-acting insulin into the body around the clock


--Refinements could lead to using the device as an early warning system for wearers.

 

--No more finger-prick testing

 

--Harvests energy from incoming radio frequency waves to power the device enough to collect and transmit one glucose reading per second

 

--Research on the contact lenses began several years earlier at the University of Washington

 

--The "Internet of Things" marches on

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Now, smartphone photography to diagnose eye disease

Now, smartphone photography to diagnose eye disease | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Washington: Eyephone! A simple and inexpensive technique that uses smartphone photography can help diagnose eye diseases, scientists say. Retinal (or fundus) photography is an essential part of any...
Kel Mohror's insight:

--Commercial fundus cameras can cost tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars

 

--mHealth will enable "workforce magnifying" in the healthcare professions

 

--greater use of mobile medical apps by providers will be a confidence patients, family members and caregivers will generalize to use of health apps

 

--every traditional medical device will have its "footprint" and profitability disrupted by mobile medical app developments

 

--chronic disease prevention is only somewhat driven by knowledge and mostly driven by convenience of adopting and maintaining healthy, habitual behaviors

 

--ACA encourages greater dependence on disease symptom treatment through its "health insurance for all" goal, magnifying the steady cost-increases of healthcare

 

--mHealth encourages greater self-care and decision-making by individuals and patients

 

--mHealth literacy is an essential element of overall health literacy

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New Concerns on Robotic Surgeries

New Concerns on Robotic Surgeries | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
A study says that some cases of serious injuries involving robotically assisted surgeries performed by the da Vinci system were not reported to an F.D.A.-mandated database.
Kel Mohror's insight:

--A 2010 study found that 56.8 percent of surgeons surveyed anonymously said they had experienced irrecoverable operative malfunctions while using the da Vinci system

 

--Women were more likely to be harmed during the robotic procedures

 

--cost $1.5 million to $2.5 million

 

--“This whole issue is symbolic of a larger problem in American health care, which is the lack of proper evaluation of what we do,” Dr. Martin A. Makary, an associate professor of surgery at Johns Hopkins and the senior author of the paper.

 

--researchers at Johns Hopkins were able to find examples of botched operations that were not reported to the agency. They concluded that adverse events associated with the da Vinci were “vastly underreported.”

 

--questions about the quality of training provided

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Drones Could Give Heart Patients Fast Access to Defibrillators in Remote Areas | Qmed

Drones Could Give Heart Patients Fast Access to Defibrillators in Remote Areas | Qmed | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Qmed (formerly Medical Device Link) is the world's first completely prequalified supplier directory and news source for medical device OEMs. Find medical device suppliers and IVD suppliers who are FDA-registered, ISO 13485- and ISO 9001-certified.
Kel Mohror's insight:

--experiment by Definetz, a German non-profit organization

 

--partner Height Tech

 

--launched using an app

 

--guided by GPS

 

[generalize to capabilities of delivering any time-sensitive items in emergency situations]

 

[equip them with transponders so everyone knows precisely where they are at all times]

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Is mHealth the Future? [Infographic] | StartUp Health

Is mHealth the Future? [Infographic] | StartUp Health | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Is #mHealth the Future? [Infographic] http://t.co/hH5DtGiOUh #mobilehealth #healthIT #telehealth
Kel Mohror's insight:

--No question; mHealth is the present expanding into the future. Insurers and health plans must whole-heartedly embrace mHealth to reap its financial benefits while policy-holders and members reap the benefits of better health and wellness.

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Boston Scientific Launches OPTIMISE Trial of Precision™ Neurostimulator for Treatment of Chronic Migraine

Boston Scientific Launches OPTIMISE Trial of Precision™ Neurostimulator for Treatment of Chronic Migraine | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Boston Scientific announced that it has launched a clinical trial to determine whether occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) using the Precision™ System can safely and effectively treat chronic migrain...
Kel Mohror's insight:

--occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) might be "safe and effective" in treating  chronic migraine when used in conjunction with anti-migraine medications

 

--a small programmable implanted device sends electrical impulses to the greater occipital nerve

 

--headaches maylast more than four hours a day with some adults experiencing headaches 15 or more days per month


--"relatively low-risk therapy”

 

[ Which begs the question- Which is relieving the pain; the meds or the implant? Surgery is traumatic; *brain* surgery is outright frightening. Who knows if after the procedure all of "the lights" will remain on? ]

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University of Nebraska working on a brain-scanning device to allow 10-minute concussion test - Neurogadget.com

University of Nebraska working on a brain-scanning device to allow 10-minute concussion test - Neurogadget.com | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
The day is coming when players who take a hit to the head will come to the sideline for a concussion test, take off their helmet and slip on an electrode-covered mesh cap.
Kel Mohror's insight:

The NFLPA is salivating over this tool.

 

--is a type of magnetic resonance imaging machine — known as a functional MRI — that tracks the brain’s blood flow.


--it’s hoped the $3 million scanner helps in the effort to better define what is and is not a concussion.


--electrode net placed over the head and battery-powered brain-recording equipment would measure the player’s responses to stimuli.

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Two Irish firms chosen for EU research project to revolutionise medical devices

Two Irish firms chosen for EU research project to revolutionise medical devices | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Galway-based medical device manufacturer Crospon, and Adama Innovations, a new spin-out from the Irish nanoscience institute CRANN, have been selected to take part in a European Commission-led project called FaBiMed.
Kel Mohror's insight:

--"European Commission-led project called FaBiMed."


--"To improve and develop new nanotechnology manufacturing techniques for medical devices."


--"Adama Innovations will examine how this micro-patterning could be used in moulds and coatings when producing medical devices."


--insights in-work

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mHealth

mHealth | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
PwC report shows developed and emerging markets see mHealth's potential to transform healthcare innovation, but resistance to change could be a barrier.
Kel Mohror's insight:

--Price Waterhouse Coopers (PWC) attempts to answer "How can we be sure that mobile healthcare (mHealth) isn't just technology-driven hype?"

 

--there are five infographic panel categories

 

  Expectations vs. reality

  Innovation vs. resistance

  Colliding interests

  Emerging market trailblazers and

  Solutions vs. technolgy

 

--left upper sidebar links include "Key Findings" for the above five

 

--PWC insights offer solid actionable knowledge for health entrepreneurs.

 

--so much knowledge; so little time  : |

 

 

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Cefaly Migraine Pain Relief

Cefaly Migraine Pain Relief | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Now available in Canada, Cefaly is a revolutionary medical device proven to effective against headaches and migraine pain. Cefaly is the first cranial analgesic electrotherapeutic device to acquire ISO medical certification proven effective on migraine pain with no side effects.
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Acute- & Chronic-Pain Relief

Acute- & Chronic-Pain Relief | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
SpringTMS ™ Total Migraine System
Kel Mohror's insight:

"Migraines are most common during a person’s highly productive years, between the ages of 15 and 55. The World Health Organization ranks migraine in the top 20 causes of disability.3 The financial burden in the UK is estimated at £5 billion per year4 while the National Headache Foundation estimates US costs at nearly $24 billion."

 

"Studies have shown that about 70%9 of migraine patients are not satisfied with or cannot tolerate the side effects associated with medications."

 

[The eNuera web site says "For investiational use only," so perhaps the Spring TMS "isn't ready for prime time"? ]

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Sewing Machine Hacked Into Printer for Flexible Electronics

Sewing Machine Hacked Into Printer for Flexible Electronics | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Flexible and stretchable electronics is a hot field of research these days, as the future of medical devices that can more naturally comply to the human bo
Kel Mohror's insight:

Researchers at Purdue University have harnessed a regular sewing machine to basically sew flexible connections using a conventional wire.

 

The squiggly pattern of wire is embedded into Ecoflex, an elasomer made by Smooth-On (Easton, PA).

 

The final product allows it to stretch to 500% of its length.

 

Combined with electroconductive polymers, eHealth innovators can "change the ways things are done" in healthcare much like the microelectronics and microcomputer entrepreneurs changed "the ways things are done" over the last 40 years.

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Examples of MMAs the FDA Has Cleared or Approved

Kel Mohror's insight:

Scroll to see many examples of mobile medical applications  the FDA has cleared or approved since 1997, such as

--Freestyle Tracker Diabetes Management System

--Pill Phone

--CG-6108 Continuous ECG Monitor and Arrhythmia Detector and

--CareStream PACS.

 

Finding a MMA that is similar (a "predicate device") to what your design is to do will make your 510(k) submission easier.

 

Using the word "mobile" in a Quick Search of the FDA "Establishment Registration & Device Listing" database will yield (as of 14 June 2014) 315 devices.

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfRL/TextSearch.cfm

 

In addition to mobile apps, approved or cleared devices with "mobile" in the name will force you to exclude many devices, such as Mobile Pole Stand, Mobile manual wheelchair lift and DX-D100 - System, X-Ray, Mobile.

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[INFOGRAPHIC] M-Health Physician Use of Mobile Technology

[INFOGRAPHIC] M-Health Physician Use of Mobile Technology | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Kel Mohror's insight:

--"In the Affordable Care Act environment, healthcare providers have a real opportunity to transform the way they treat people."


--"For patients, digital health solutions include everything from Web portals to body sensors and apps—everything people need to better monitor their own condition and get support between physician visits."


--"On the provider side, mobile platforms such as smartphones and tablets are becoming ubiquitous in doctor’s offices and hospitals, as a means to standardize care protocols, improve the flow of information, and ease the implementation of electronic health records."


--"78% of consumers express interest in mHealth solutions"

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We Need a Moore’s Law for Medicine | Quality Digest

We Need a Moore’s Law for Medicine | Quality Digest | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Technology, the primary cause of skyrocketing healthcare costs, could also be the cure Moore’s Law predicts that every two years the cost of computing will fall by half. That’s one reason why tomorrow’s gadgets may be better, and cheaper, too.
Kel Mohror's insight:

"Micky Tripathi, CEO of the Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative, notes- 'We are at Version 1.0 of health information technology. It is too early to know.'"

 

"Vinod Khosla, a prominent Silicon Valley investor, predicts that machines might replace 80 percent of their [doctors] work."

 

[As the distinction between "health apps" and "mobile medical apps" grows less clear and smartphones are used to access health and medicine knowledge bases, ailment diagnosis may go the way of PCB design; the easy 80% is done by apps and the tough 20% design/diagnosis has to be resolved by a human.

 

Many healthcare organizations, from the VHA to Kaiser Permanent to Mayo Clinic have determined mobile health (mHealth) strategies to be a method to reduce the costs of care delivery.

 

While these reductions have been primarily regarding chronic disease management, reductions can be expanded to include disease prevention as the percentage of Americans owning smartphones continues toward being universal.]

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A first look at the new fitness-focused Samsung smartwatch, Galaxy Gear

A first look at the new fitness-focused Samsung smartwatch, Galaxy Gear | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Samsung's new smart watch, Galaxy Gear, is set to debut Wednesday. Here's a preview.
Kel Mohror's insight:

--"smartphone companion rather than replacement"

 

--said to have "Wi-Fi for Internet access, including e-mail, even when it’s not connected to a smartphone"

 

--Samsung S Voice for voice commands, 4 Mp camera

 

--can track your health data, including steps, heart rate, calorie intake

 

--can measure your heart rate at any time via a built-in heart rate monitor

 

-- Samsung’s burgeoning interest in health tracking technology

 

--a health startup, based in Palo Alto, Calif, has been working with Samsung to develop fitness apps


--poor battery life and few apps remain problems

 

--author Farr prediction: Apple’s iWatch will be a platform of sorts, a “sensor network” on the wrist that compiles data from devices worn around the body


--a sign that the category is not quite yet ready for primetime

 

[Coupling health tracking with a doctor's diagnosis of a condition and care plan requires the appropriate behavior-change coaching to be a useful mobile medical app. Coaching texts and interactive process apps are not "impossible" to integrate; they just take longer than the merely "difficult."]

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After Watson, IBM Looks to Build 'Brain in a Box' - Fox Business

After Watson, IBM Looks to Build 'Brain in a Box' - Fox Business | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
After Watson, IBM Looks to Build 'Brain in a Box' Fox Business The Watson supercomputer may be able to beat reigning Jeopardy champions, but scientists at IBM (IBM) are developing new, super-smart computer chips designed from the human brain -- and...
Kel Mohror's insight:

--IBM Watson for Healthcare will leverage this capability for various "as-a-Service" to solo practitioners as well as major providers. County health departments should also be monitoring the progress of Watson-based innovations, as should health insurers.

 

--hopefully IBM Watson for FDA Medical Device Regulatory Compliance is in the pipeline.

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allAfrica.com: Kenya: Doctors Prevent Blindness With 'Revolutionary' Phone APP

allAfrica.com: Kenya: Doctors Prevent Blindness With 'Revolutionary' Phone APP | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
allAfrica: African news and information for a global audience
Kel Mohror's insight:

--undergone eye tests, not in a clinic with a doctor, but on their own doorstep

 

--using a smart-phone application

 

--uses a camera to scan the lens of the eye for cataracts

 

--the app is called PEEK, or Portable Eye Examination Kit.

 

-- $40 on a cataract operation

 

--look at the supply side of the equation, there are just not enough trained doctors or nurses

 

--PEEK app results appear to be keeping up with his hospital equipment valued at well over $100,000 and his team of 15 trained personnel.

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New Cry Analyzer Could Detect Babies\' Health Problems

New Cry Analyzer Could Detect Babies\' Health Problems | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Researchers from Brown University have developed a device that can analyze a baby\'s cry, potentially detecting developmental or neurological problems in babies from an early stage.
Kel Mohror's insight:

--one researcher refers to a baby's cry as "a window into the brain."

 

--the report also mentions a "Smart Diaper" and its app. [Will that call always be taken?]

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Smartphone images measure up to desktop views in neurology study | PhysBizTech

Smartphone images measure up to desktop views in neurology study | PhysBizTech | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Kel Mohror's insight:

Health innovations are "health reform," not government "blunt force."

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Scanadu raises $1 million on Indiegogo, buys more time to crowdfund medical tricorder device | mobihealthnews

Scanadu raises $1 million on Indiegogo, buys more time to crowdfund medical tricorder device | mobihealthnews | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Kel Mohror's insight:

Scanadu SCOUT will measure nine physiological values, such as pulse wave transit time (PWTT).

 

--no indication on its website as to the smartphone OS compatibility [assuming iOS and Android]

 

--nick-named "tricorder," the SCOUT is pinched between forefinger and thumb to get measurements or placed against the forehead.

 

--"to analyze, track, and trend your vitals with unprecedented simplicity."

 

--[speculating at least FDA regulation as a Class II medical device; wouldn't be surprised if FDA slapped a Class III category on SCOUT.]

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Marshfield Snags Million Hearts Award for Mobile App

Marshfield Snags Million Hearts Award for Mobile App | Health Information Technology Concierge | Scoop.it
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation in Wisconsin has won the Million Hearts Risk Check Challenge for building a free mobile app for consumers to self-assess their risk of a heart attack.
Kel Mohror's insight:

--the report has a link to download the free app

 

--the link to the web-based version is http://www.hearthealthmobile.com/app/index.html

 

--provides a quick heart health check

--motivates users to obtain a more accurate assessment including
  blood pressure and
  cholesterol values

 

--can access risk for other conditions, such as stroke and diabetes, using electronic health records data.

 

--contest was sponsored by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC HIT)

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