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How vaccines change the way we think about disease

How vaccines change the way we think about disease | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it
Before the vaccine, we thought measles was a 'mild' illness. This is because vaccines drive down the number of people getting the disease while increasing our awareness of the risks.

Via Peter Mellow
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Julianna Bonola's curator insight, February 24, 10:02 PM

Given recent moves to penalize parents who do not have their children vacinated, I thought this article most timely.  Have a read.

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5 Signs You May Be Consuming Too Much Fiber

5 Signs You May Be Consuming Too Much Fiber | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it
Too much fiber can be just as troublesome as not enough, so it’s good to know the signs of taking it too far. While it may be better to err on the side of too much rather than too little, we’re after the Goldilocks of fiber intake, and getting it “just right” is the only way to go. 1...
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US poised to withdraw warnings about cholesterol in diet - The News Journal

US poised to withdraw warnings about cholesterol in diet - The News Journal | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

The nation's top nutrition advisory panel has decided to drop its caution about eating cholesterol-laden food, a move that could undo almost 40 years of government warnings about its consumption.

The group's finding that cholesterol in the diet need no longer be considered a "nutrient of concern" stands in contrast to the committee's findings five years ago, the last time it convened. During those proceedings, as in previous years, the panel deemed the issue of "excess dietary cholesterol" a public health concern. The most current finding was discussed at the group's last meeting.

The new view on cholesterol in the diet does not reverse warnings about high levels of "bad" cholesterol in the blood, which have been linked to heart disease. Moreover, some experts warned that people with particular health problems, such as diabetes, should continue to avoid cholesterol-rich diets.

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Happy Weight vs. Healthy Weight

Happy Weight vs. Healthy Weight | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Some doctors don’t even like to talk about ideal weight. That’s because it can often seem too hard to reach. The fact is, even small amounts of weight loss are healthy.

Instead of focusing on that ideal weight, Brandeis says to aim low. A 7% to 10% weight loss makes a huge impact on your metabolism, she says. Once you reach that goal, the next 10% seems much easier.

Small changes are more likely to become permanent and, over time, have big impacts, Stieghan agrees.

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California Readies Another Assault On Sugary Drinks

California Readies Another Assault On Sugary Drinks | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

If the soft drink industry thought its fight with health reformers ended in the San Francisco Bay Area last election season, a new bill in the California legislature may be a rude awakening, reviving the movement to cut the state's sugary beverage consumption.

“I don’t think this issue is going to go away -- not given the increasing concern with obesity, especially childhood obesity,” Larry Gerston, a political analyst and San Jose State University professor, told The Huffington Post.

Last fall's soda battles focused on taxing the sweet drinks. The new challenge is warning labels. California Senate Majority Leader Bill Monning (D-Carmel) introduced a proposal Wednesday to put warnings on beverages containing added sweeteners with at least 75 calories per 12 ounces. The labels would read: “STATE OF CALIFORNIA SAFETY WARNING: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay.”

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Holland woman's Kickstarter campaign 'Tater Tats' hopes to promote healthy ... - Cheboygan Daily News

Holland woman's Kickstarter campaign 'Tater Tats' hopes to promote healthy ... - Cheboygan Daily News | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Some of the best ideas have humble beginnings — and that’s true enough for Tater Tats, but it needs some community support to get off the ground.

Jenna Weiler came upon her idea with the help of coworkers at Groundswell Farm, a Zeeland-based community-supported agriculture farm that allows people in the community to buy shares at a set price early in the year and then share in what’s produced during the season at the farm. It was her passion for local, organic, fresh and in season produce that started the Tater Tats idea. While picking green beans in the field this past summer, she and others joked about tattooing the vegetable on their arms so they knew the correct size at which to pick it. It was then someone called it a tater tat.


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Age of Happiness: The people who refuse to grow old

Age of Happiness: The people who refuse to grow old | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

I've always thought the best I could hope for was to grow old gracefully. This story is about those who refuse to grow old at all!


Photographed by Yakovlev in November 2011, at the age of 93, Tao Porchon-Lynch is a dancer and a yoga teacher. Since she began dancing competitively at the age of 87, Porchon-Lynch has won more than 600 prizes, and at 96 is still teaching yoga. An average day includes three hours of yoga classes in the morning, followed by two hours of dancing in the afternoon – her partners are 70 years younger than her. “I don’t believe in age. I believe in strength of energy,” she tells those who suggest she calms down. In a 2014 TED talk, she described her response to a six-year-old girl who asked her what she was going to do when she retired. “I’m not going to retire … I’m going to dance my way to the next planet.”

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Food Swaps Slideshow: Meals and Snacks for a Healthy Heart

Food Swaps Slideshow: Meals and Snacks for a Healthy Heart | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it
Cream cheese, sausage, even muffins can be heart-healthy. See what to buy and how to cook in this WebMD slideshow.
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You could get the measles, even if you're vaccinated | PBS NewsHour

You could get the measles, even if you're vaccinated | PBS NewsHour | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Contained inside the data of the latest measles outbreak is a surprising — and troubling — number. Among the 51 measles cases linked directly to Disneyland, six of the people had received their measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

It should come as little surprise when the unvaccinated get sick with the measles. As viruses go, this one packs a mighty punch. Nine of out 10 unvaccinated people exposed to the measles virus will get the measles. That’s a whopping 90 percent.

But why hadn’t the vaccine protected these six people who had been vaccinated?

Here’s the thing. The MMR vaccine is very effective, but it’s not 100 percent preventative. Some people who get the vaccine are still at risk of contracting the disease. Large numbers of vaccinated people act as a firewall that prevent the disease from spreading to those who are vulnerable. The vaccinated protect the unvaccinated. That’s known as “herd immunity.” But as more people opt not to get vaccinated, or not to get their children vaccinated, the virus has more portals to creep through, more people to infect. And those people sneeze and cough, releasing the virus into the air, and that fuels the spread of the disease.

Some parents opt out of the MMR vaccine, often due to thoroughly discredited studies that link it to autism. Simply put, if everyone got the vaccine, the virus would have nowhere to go. The unvaccinated keep the measles alive.

But let’s back up. The MMR vaccine works by introducing tiny live amounts of the three viruses — measles, mumps and rubella — to provoke an immune response in the body that serves as a lifelong protective shield. It comes in two doses. Typically the first is administered at 12 months and the second at 4 or 5 years old. The first dose provides 95 percent protection. But 5 percent of patients have immune systems that don’t respond to these antibodies. The second kindergarten-age dose bolsters the coverage to 99 percent.

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9 Freaking Adorable "How We Met" Stories That Will Bring Out Your Inner Mush-Ball

9 Freaking Adorable "How We Met" Stories That Will Bring Out Your Inner Mush-Ball | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Despite the crazy amount of dating apps and sites, people still seem to be finding their S.O. without the help of technology. And even though there is absolutely nothing wrong with looking for The One via the Internet, those old-fashioned meet-cutes still make for really amazing, make-you-feel-things stories. Since a good love story is pretty much the best thing ever, we asked Women's Health Facebook followers, our friends, and WH staffers for the adorable ways they met their partners. Warning: Things are about to get adorable up in here.


To read the full article and get the dish, please click the link below.

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Foods That Help RA

Foods That Help RA | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

There's no perfect plan to help people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) feel better, but eating a variety of healthy foods is good for your overall well-being and weight. You might try the Mediterranean diet, which features fish, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables that can lower inflammation.


The omega-3 fatty acids found in salmon, tuna, trout, and other cold-water fish can fight inflammation, so they're good for people with RA. Omega-3s in fish and fish oil help ease aching joints and morning stiffness. Eat about two 3-ounce servings of fish each week.


If fish isn't your thing, omega-3 supplements may ease morning stiffness. They could even help you cut back on anti-inflammatory medicines. Borage seed oil may also relieve pain along with your RA meds. Always talk to your doctor about any supplements you take.

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Homemade Peppermint Lip Balm

Homemade Peppermint Lip Balm | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it
I love making homemade gifts. The love that goes into creating a gift with your own hands makes it so special and personal.  This time of year, lip balm is a gift you can’t go wrong with – it makes for a perfect gift topper or stocking stuffer that is oh so usable. This recipe

Via Julie B
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How fermented foods help the body - Times of India

How fermented foods help the body - Times of India | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Fermentation has been done for years but it is said to be back as a food trend in a big way.

Many opt for fermentation because it helps in increasing the nutritional value of food. It also has several other benefits. We take you through some of them...

Digestion: Fermented foods are easily digestible because of their probiotic content. The process of fermentation helps in making the meal more digestible because it breaks down, hard-to-digest cellulose in food.

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The perfect job doesn't exist, so focus on this instead

The perfect job doesn't exist, so focus on this instead | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it
Erin Ganju, co-Founder and CEO of Room to Read

Via JettRay
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What Dog Owners Need To Know About Helping Their Dog Learn

What Dog Owners Need To Know About Helping Their Dog Learn | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

When you adopt a dog, you know they come with a history. She may have had no human contact until she was rescued, or maybe the only contact was abusive. Dogs with histories like this can be unresponsive to training, which frustrates their new owners and result in a return trip to the shelter.

If something like this happens, it’s usually because we humans have forgotten that the dog we are trying to train may not even understand the concept—they don’t know how to learn.



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More Evidence That Even 'Moderate' Exercise Helps Women's Hearts - U.S. News & World Report

More Evidence That Even 'Moderate' Exercise Helps Women's Hearts - U.S. News & World Report | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Even a few bouts of moderate exercise each week can cut a middle-aged woman's odds for heart disease, blood clots and stroke, a new study finds.

The British study also found that exercising more frequently didn't lead to greater reductions in heart risk.

The take-home message, according to study lead author Miranda Armstrong: "To prevent heart disease, stroke and blood clots, women don't have to be super athletes or strenuously exercise daily to experience the benefits of physical activity."

In fact, adding lots of extra strenuous exercise may offer "little additional benefit above that from moderately frequent activity," Armstrong said in a news release from the American Heart Association. She is a physical activity epidemiologist at Oxford University in England.

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Naps May Undo Hormonal Effects of Lost Sleep

Naps May Undo Hormonal Effects of Lost Sleep | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Brief daytime naps might protect you against the harmful health effects of a poor night'ssleep, a new study suggests.

Specifically, naps appeared to restore hormones and proteins involved in stress and immune function to normal levels in the study.

The small study included 11 healthy men between the ages of 25 and 32. Researchers restricted the volunteers' sleep to only two hours for a night. The next day, they had a 2.5-fold increase in levels of norepinephrine, a stress hormone that increases heart rateblood pressure and blood sugar.

They also had lower levels of a protein called interleukin-6, which fights viruses.

On another night, sleep was limited to two hours again. However, the next day they were allowed to take two 30-minute naps. After napping, the men's norepinephrine and interleukin-6 levels were normal.

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Bring your love life back to the boil: It's easier than you think - and you ... - Daily Mail

Bring your love life back to the boil: It's easier than you think - and you ... - Daily Mail | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Loaded looks, lingering kisses — then you and your partner fall into each other’s arms and the cares of the day melt away.

It sounds great, doesn’t it. But from what I’ve learned about long-term relationships after 30 years as a marital therapist, I wouldn’t be surprised if passionate love-making rarely happens for you.

If it does, it’s probably on holiday or during a weekend away — when you’re relaxed and have time for each other.

All too often, sex is the last thing on our minds after a long and busy day. And instead of bonding us, it becomes another thing on a never ending to-do list, a source of arguments or off-limits altogether.




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STITCHES West 2015 | Knitting Universe

STITCHES West 2015 | Knitting Universe | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it
Joleen Bennett's insight:

Stitches West is on its way! If you knit, crochet, spin, weave or dye and you haven't heard of Stitches then you are missing something spectacular.


Click on over to learn more about Stitches and its classes and world class market.

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New advice for flying when pregnant

New advice for flying when pregnant | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

The safest time to fly during pregnancy is before 37 weeks or, if carrying twins, before 32 weeks, new advice says.


The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists says flying is not harmful during a low-risk pregnancy, but there may be side-effects.


If more than 28 weeks pregnant, a woman should take her medical notes and a GP's letter.


Via Peter Mellow
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How to Make Homemade Bone Broth

How to Make Homemade Bone Broth | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it
Broth (or technically, stock) is a mineral rich infusion made by boiling bones of healthy animals with vegetables, herbs and spices. You’ll find a large stock pot of broth/stock simmering in the kitchen of almost every 5-star restaurant for its great culinary uses and unparalleled flavor, but it is also a powerful health tonic that you can easily add to your family’s diet.Broth is a traditional food that your grandmother likely made often (and if not, your great-grandmother definitely did). Many societies around the world still consume broth regularly as it is a cheap and highly nutrient dense food.Besides it’s amazing taste and culinary uses, broth is an excellent source of minerals and is known to boost the immune system (chicken soup when you are sick anyone?) and improve digestion. Its high calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus content make it great for bone and tooth health. Bone broth also supports joints, hair, skin, and nails due to its high collagen content. In fact, some even suggest that it helps eliminate cellulite as it supports smooth connective tissue.It can be made from the bones of beef, bison, lamb, poultry, or fish, and vegetables and spices are often added.
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Will Fitness And Activity Trackers Really Make Us Healthier? - Yahoo Health

Will Fitness And Activity Trackers Really Make Us Healthier? - Yahoo Health | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

According to my Misfit Shine, on Wednesday, January 7, I slept for six hours and 55 minutes, but only three hours and 33 minutes were “restful sleep.” On Monday, January 12, My Up by Jawbone congratulated me with “Way to start strong” after I logged 10,887 steps and 45 minutes of “cross-training” (AKA “Refine Method,” which was not a menu option).

There is data about my water intake on Nudge, my food choices on Noom, and my steps, sleep patterns, and workout sessions, just all over the effing place.

Confession: I have no idea what any of it means other than that I’m wasting a lot of workout and shut-eye time staring at a screen. (And did I mention my phone is dying?)

Welcome to the new era of wellness wearables. In the past few months, the market for fitness and health trackers has exploded. Jawbone introduced the Up Move and the Up3, Fitbit unveiled three new models, the Microsoft Band debuted, and Garmin announced the Vivofit 2, complete with bands designed by Jonathan Adler (to match your pretty leggings). Not to mention the smartwatches that also act as trackers, like the much-anticipated health-focused Apple Watch and the Sony SmartWatch, which works with GoogleFit.

With every new launch, you can track more—from steps to calories to the elevation you’re running at—and while the data is meant to be empowering and ignite healthy behavioral changes, recent research has shown that a huge percentage of users take them off and throw them in a drawer after six months.

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Slideshow: 10 Daily Habits to Reduce Chronic Pain

Slideshow: 10 Daily Habits to Reduce Chronic Pain | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

It's a Catch-22: You're hurting, so you don't exercise; but without exercise, you may lose muscle tone and strength, making pain worse. Fortunately, even mild exercise releases endorphins, the feel-good brain chemicals that lift mood and block pain. Ask your doctor if aerobic, strengthening, or stretching exercises can give your body the boost -- and relief -- it needs.  


It sounds so obvious, but few of us actually take the time to stop what we're doing and calm our minds. Deep breathing, biofeedback, and meditation are all stress management techniques that relax your body, which helps ease pain. Talk to your doctor to learn more, but in the meantime, slow down, close your eyes…breathe in…breathe out.


You need a good night's sleep to help soothe the stresses pain puts on your body. Although alcohol can help you fall asleep, as it metabolizes, it promotes shallow sleep, reduces important REM sleep, and may even wake you. The result: A less restful night.

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Why Jogging May Be Better For Your Health Than Running

Why Jogging May Be Better For Your Health Than Running | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

If you’re a runner who secretly hates running, here’s some good news: Taking it down a notch or two, settling into a leisurely jog rather than an all-out run, may actually be better for your health in the long term. A new study shows what others have hinted at in the past: That jogging may be just as good, and perhaps even better, than running when it comes to how long we live.

The team from Denmark followed over 5000 people taking part in the Copenhagen City Heart Study, and tracked whether they were non-joggers, or joggers who kept a slow, moderate, or strenuous pace. The participants’ health was tracked over the next 12 years, and so was their mortality: 28 of the joggers and 128 of the non-joggers died.

So the connection was this: Joggers of mild and moderate intensity had a lower risk of death than the strenuous joggers. In fact, the lowest mortality risk was that of the mild intensity joggers. The fast-paced joggers had about the same rate of mortality as sedentary people. This suggests that there may be an upper limit to in vigorous exercise, after which the benefits fall off.

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How to make kombucha - Mother Nature Network

How to make kombucha - Mother Nature Network | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Combine the current interest in probiotic drinks with the DIY craft brewing movement and the endpoint is kombucha, a health drinkpresently making inroads among the health and wellness crowd. The piquant slightly fizzy concoction starts out as sweetened tea and morphs into fermented goodness with the help of a scoby. That is a "symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast" to newcomers to the burgeoning fermenting and brewing scene.

 
Why drink it? Advocates claim kombucha benefits the gut flora inhabiting our intestines that boost our immune system and the perceived wisdom is a daily dose promotes overall good health. But I would argue that the real reason for making a batch of the "booch" is the thrill of experimentation and the taste. It's a sweet and sour blend with a memorable zing brought together by the fermentation process.
 
How to get started: First, find a kombucha-making friend by posting a note at the food co-op or online at sites that cater to the fermenting community. Next, gather your supplies and equipment. A scoby resembles a translucent flattened jellyfish, and is a bit slimy to the touch. Yum. Keep in mind, a scoby is a living culture, so it requires nutrients and a stable environment in which to prosper. Once activated, they tend to grow, and then divide into more scobies. So be prepared to share scobies with other people.
 
Making a small batch of kombucha isn't all that difficult, but attention needs to be paid to details because taking a slapdash approach toward brewing the stuff will likely lead to poor results. The following are guidelines for continuous kombucha, a brewing technique that keeps the scoby healthy that streamlines the fermentation process.



Read more: http://www.mnn.com/food/recipes/stories/how-to-make-kombucha?__scoop_post=758edd80-88b6-11e4-dd8d-842b2b775358&__scoop_topic=2711405#__scoop_post=758edd80-88b6-11e4-dd8d-842b2b775358&__scoop_topic=2711405#ixzz3MY97aBaS

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