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GMO measure foes not going gently - Statesman Journal

The cheers of supporters celebrating the resounding victory of the anti-GMO measure had barely died away when opponents started threatening a lawsuit. The lobbying group Oregonians for Food and Shelter should think twice before proceeding.

A suit claiming the GMO ban violates the state's right-to-farm law not only is likely to fail, but will needlessly prolong hard feelings on both sides of the issue. We did not support the measure, but the voters have spoken loud and clear, and it is now the law; opponents should accept that and move on.

The state right-to-farm law, enacted in 1993, is intended to protect ordinary farming practices from challenges by neighbors who object to dust, odors, noise and other normal consequences of farming in rural areas. The law serves an important purpose by preventing land-use conflicts resulting from residential uses encroaching on traditional farming areas.

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Incredible Health Benefits Tea

Incredible Health Benefits Tea | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it


While people love tea for its flavor, did you know that tea originated as a medicinal drink thousands of years ago? Check out the amazing healing properties and health perks (weight loss included!) of different tasty varieties of tea. Consider trying a natural tea remedy before hitting the medicine cabinet next time something ails you.  


Green Tea  
Though it seems to have been around since the beginning of time, green tea has solidified its massive cultural popularity in the past decade (Green Tea Frappuccino anyone?).  

“Green tea has enjoyed fame in recent years as it has been under the research spotlight,” explains registered dietitian Jacqueline Aizen. “Green tea is rich in EGCG, a powerful antioxidant that has been linked to improved cholesterol, and possibly inhibiting the growth of cancer cells.”

 

Ginger “Tea”  
Ginger can be a godsend for your stomach. Internist Dr. Andrea Ruman explains that ginger is “used to aid digestion and treat stomach upset, stomach cramps, bloating, diarrhea and nausea.” Ginger accomplishes this mighty task by suppressing stomach contractions and improving the movement of food and fluids through your intestines.   You can buy pre-made ginger tea, but why not make your own from ginger root when your stomach needs calming 

Oolong Tea  
You may remember hearing rumblings of oolong tea a few years back when it burst on the scene as a weight loss aid.  

The antioxidant catechin in oolong tea, along with the tea’s caffeine, is thought to boost the metabolism for up to two hours after you drink it. Oolong also contains Polyphenols, which have been shown to help block the body from storing fat, which in turn may help you to keep the weight off.    

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Natural Remedies - Acid Reflux

Natural Remedies - Acid Reflux | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Because prescription medications can sometimes have unwanted side effects, many people look for natural cures for acid reflux. In addition, most prescription medications were not designed to be taken for long periods of time, possibly while a person makes dietary and lifestyle changes which can be natural remedies for acid reflux. Herbal remedies for acid reflux are based on what herbalists know of traditional medicine and traditional medicinal plants. Some of these are common food herbs, which pose no danger for long-term use, but their effectiveness as natural cures for acid reflux has not been proven.

If you have been diagnosed with acid reflux, it is important to see your doctor regularly, even if you feel that your symptoms are under control. And you should let your doctor know about any botanical or herbal remedies for acid reflux that you may be using. It is important to see your doctor regularly, because stomach acid can damage the esophagus and lead to more serious conditions including cancer of the esophagus. If you are relying on natural cures for acid reflux and you become hoarse in the morning, develop a cough, or feel a need to clear your throat frequently, these may be symptoms of silent acid reflux. Silent acid reflux is the term used to describe acid reflux that affects the voice box and the vocal cords, but does not cause heartburn symptoms. So even if natural remedies for acid reflux keep your heartburn under control, you should still see your doctor regularly and report new or different symptoms.

Herbal remedies for acid reflux include chamomile, meadowsweet, slippery elm, cancer bush, fennel, catnip, angelica root, gentian root, ginger root and other botanicals, including aloe. Slippery elm was used historically by native peoples to treat stomach upset, diarrhea, constipation, heartburn and other digestive complaints. Fennel and gingerroot were also common “folk remedies” for the relief of indigestion. Modern herbalists have found that a combination of several of the herbs that had been used for indigestion could be effective natural remedies for acid reflux. Some may call them natural “cures” for acid reflux, but long-term relief of acid reflux is best accomplished by changes in lifestyle and eating habits.

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Exercise Crucial for Women's Heart Health

Exercise Crucial for Women's Heart Health | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Staying physically active is far more likely to determine a woman's future risk of heart disease than any other well-known factor, including smoking, obesity and high blood pressure, a new studyreports.

Looking across the lifespan of Australian women using data on more than 32,000 of them, University of Queensland researchers found that physical inactivity served as the leading risk factor for heart disease at every age from the early 30s to late 80s.

"We have to get everyone to move more," said lead author Wendy Brown, director of the university's Center for Research on Exercise, Physical Activity and Health. "From about age 30, physical activity levels decline. We need to do everything we can to prevent this."

Even though this study was conducted in Australia, American women should figure that physical inactivity will affect their risk of heart disease in much the same way, said Dr. Michael Scott Emery, co-chair of the American College of Cardiology's Sports and Exercise Cardiology Council.

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Work it Off: How to Burn Off a Margarita

Work it Off: How to Burn Off a Margarita | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

This week I met up with a couple of girlfriends for a welcome home dinner. We went out for healthy Mexican food at Porque No?, one of my favorite restaurants here in Portland. They have tasty fish tacos, homemade tortilla chips, and delish guacamole. They also make a mean margarita. I ordered one, but I got way more than I bargained for—a margarita served in a full-on pint glass. (As in, way bigger than the one below:)

A pint of margarita means essentially two cocktails in one, at least. Margaritas are already known for being one of the more sugary, calorie-loaded cocktails out there so I knew I was breaking some sort of rule by drinking it. (At least I stopped at one!) When I checked the calorie count for this tequila spiked treat I found that a 3.3 fl oz serving has 153 calories. Not bad, until you factor in that the one I had was around 16 fl oz! Multiply that number by 4 and you’ve got over 600 calories in a glass!

(Too bad they weren’t following our recipe for a Skinny Margarita!

What are a few ways I could have burned off the 612 calories in this big and tasty drink?




Via Carlos Newsome
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The Lumafit Wearable Activity Tracker

The Lumafit Wearable Activity Tracker | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

If you’re like me, your exercise goals primarily consist of not looking like Jabba. That said, what if you could put on a wearable that would coach you through workouts, commenting on form and intensity and heart rate as you go. That’s what Lumafit is all about.

The $99 device ($79 for early birds) sits over your ear and clips to your ear lobe. A three-axis accelerometer “sees” your actions in real time and can identify various moves like push-ups, burpees, and going to the fridge for a beersies. It can also sense minute changes in your heart rate to assess your mindfulness while meditating.

The team, led by Darran and Stephen Hughes, is stocked with former MIT MediaLab folks and is looking to build a number of features around the platform. Because it contains a “medical grade” heart rate sensor, the system can detect stress as well as arrhythmia. An app called Bootcamp will help you create workouts and schedule meditation sessions and you can also simply wear it as an activity tracker during your day-to-day travails, using it to meditate as needed. The Dublin-based company partnered with PCH International to produce the hardware.

The team aims to ship in Q2 2014 and is looking for $60,000 in pre-orders. They’ve already hit $15,000 and they’re well on their way to becoming fully funded.

How is this device different from, say, the Atlas or even Fitbit devices? Because it doesn’t require a separate heart rate band or battery-hungry pulse sensor, it can grab a more interesting set of data. I’m particularly curious to see how accurate it is, however, because getting motion data from devices like this is notoriously difficult. Thankfully It’s a bit less obtrusive than a workout band, although you will kind of look like Lobot in yoga pants while wearing it. But I guess that’s better than looking like Greedo in a Speedo.

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Natural Remedies for Sinus Infections

Natural Remedies for Sinus Infections | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it
No one likes having a stuffy nose|Here are 7 natural remedies for sinus infections| Breathe easy again| Sante Chiropractic Wellness Centre (New blog post http://t.co/e1MsWd8upw Natural Remedies for...
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Apples to Apples

Apples to Apples | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Though the valuable piece of produce can be stored for almost a year, finding ways to prevent rot that spreads to other apples is important to conventional producers, which is why they often rely on what’s known as plant growth regulators. The chemical treatments help slow the breaking down of apples, or the forming of the dreaded “storage scald,” which is like a sunburn that causes blackening or browning of the fruit's tender skin.

But the Environmental Working Group (EWG) says a growth regulator called DPA, which was evaluated for its safety as far back as the 1960s and was reviewed again in 1998, may not be as safe as previously thought.

What's prompting the warning now? A 2012 European ban on DPA on apples and pears just took effect last month. The European Food Safety Authority, which evaluates the risk of pesticides, says carcinogenic compounds called nitrosamines can form if DPA is combined with a source of nitrogen—a gas that can be present during storage or when the fruit is processed.

When European authorities asked DPA manufacturers to test for data that showed whether or not nitrosamines formed, the industry provided one study but couldn’t determine if the compound formed when DPA broke down.

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More People Shop 'Non-GMO' Than Organic

More People Shop 'Non-GMO' Than Organic | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

The organic food industry may be growing faster than any other segment in recorded history, but these day, it turns out more people are shopping for “non-GMO” products, even though they’re not exactly sure what it means.

The news comes from a blog post by the Hartman Group, an industry data collection agency. According to the Hartman Group, “Although many people say they do not know what GMOs are, 19 percent of shoppers look for foods labeled non-GMO—which is more than the 16 percent who seek the organic label. Their interest has been heightened by voter measures calling for labels in California and Washington, by Whole Foods’ decision to label products with GMOs by 2018 and by manufacturer shifts, including General Mills removing GMOs from the original Cheerios.”

Not only are consumers looking for products specifically labeled as “non-GMO”, notes Hartman, “The percentage of consumers who deliberately avoid GMOs is even higher—33 percent—and growing quickly. Only 15 percent avoided GMOs in 2007. That growth rate is faster than any other ingredient except soy isoflavones, among ingredients avoided by at least 10 percent of consumers.”

The main reason consumers note for avoiding GMOs is the concern about the impact on their personal health and well-being (or of their family). Others say they simply want to know what is going into their food, and environmental concerns about growing GMO foods were also considerations for some buyers.

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Breaking Ground in the GMO Debate

Breaking Ground in the GMO Debate | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

There was a trace of mischief in Michael Pollan’s smile as he took the stage of Wheeler Hall at the University of California, Berkeley, last week to introduce a lecture for a course that he co-teaches, with the activist Raj Patel, called Edible Education 101. The auditorium was crammed with seven hundred students, most looking as you might expect young Berkeley food activists to look: wholesome and bright-eyed, visibly eager to help make the global food system “more equitable, healthful and sustainable,” as the course mission states. This group constituted a kind of monoculture, and Pollan was about to introduce an invasive species.

Pamela Ronald, a prominent plant geneticist and a professor at U.C.-Davis, had come, at Pollan’s invitation, to present her perspective on the benefits of genetic engineering—even though Pollan himself has been a vocal skeptic of G.M.O. foods. “If anyone can make the case for this technology, it’s Pam Ronald,” Pollan told the audience.

This was a generous but daunting introduction. It’s not easy for anyone, let alone a plant geneticist who spends fifty hours a week directing a large laboratory, to persuade a crowd of young activists to shift their thinking on one of the most contentious environmental debates of our time. Last year, G.M.O. crops—corn, cotton, and soybeans—were planted on more than a hundred and sixty-seven million acres in America. Seventy per cent of processed foods now have at least one genetically engineered ingredient. But anti-G.M.O. activists have worked to mobilize a backlash: food with the “non-G.M.O.” label is today among the fastest-growing categories of product sales in U.S. markets.

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Plantain a Natural Remedies Herbal Plant

Plantain a Natural Remedies Herbal Plant | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it
Yes, that pesky weed is your lawn is actually Plantain a natural remedies herbal plant that has many uses. The Plantain herb is astringent, anti-toxic, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-histamine, as well as demulcent, expectorant, styptic and a diuretic. The herb can be made into an external poultice to treat insect bites, poison-ivy rashes, minor sores and boils. It can also be used into wild food foraging recipes such as salads, pesto and creamy green sauces. Plantain Leaf Organic Cut & Sifted – Plantago Lanceolata, 1 lb,(Starwest Botanicals)
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Nettles for Kidney Remedy

Nettle tea is excellent for diseases and inflammations of the urinary system contains a mild laxative effect excellent at depurative remedies useful for trea...
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What's next for organics?

What's next for organics? | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

It’s been quite an interesting few weeks in the world of organics. Walmart announced a new organic initiative under the Wild Oats brand, and Target a day later shared the details of its “Made to Matter” program with 17 handpicked organic brands. Clearly, both chains are vying for that average shopper who has the desire for organics, but just can’t seem to cross that Whole Foods threshold.

 

While it is true that organic foods and beverages continue to grow double digits (and now represent just over 4% of total at-home food sales, according to the USDA), far more than the non-organic offerings occupying supermarket shelves, these two announcements might give a needed nudge to an industry that has seen market share relatively stable over the past decade. And in 2014, the California drought has had a major effect on the availability and price of both organic produce and organic meats, and while it may be too soon to quantify just how much sales have been lost, there is little doubt that some shoppers have switched to their less expensive non-organic counterparts.

 

The big question is: Will the shoppers come to Walmart and Target for organics? And why?



Read More: http://supermarketnews.com/blog/what-s-next-organics#ixzz30FM5UjNN

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Choosing Sunscreen

Choosing Sunscreen | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Choosing Sunscreen can be tricky!

We tend to buy sunscreen with a higher factor, but sometimes that does not even work. It really just depends on the sunscreen itself. Make sure you get a QUALITY sunscreen. Read the ingredients and stay away from those chemicals! Get the more natural ingredient sunscreens (zinc oxide and titanium dioxide as the active ingredients) and make sure your sunscreen is water resistant. Do your research! I also wanted to mention that using Coconut Oil does NOT act as sunscreen. Sure, it blocks SOME sun rays, but not like a sunscreen would. I have heard that people were saying it does act like sunscreen, but I did some research online and I came to the conclusion that it is NOT a good substitute for sunscreen. But, after a day in the hot sun, go ahead and slather on that coconut oil for nice, smooth skin!


Read more at http://shopwithmemama.com/2014/05/choosing-sunscreen-and-tips-to-stay-safe-in-the-sun-sunscreen-giveaway#KPRc6ri8zMWDu6XP.99
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Home Remedies - Diaper Rash

Home Remedies - Diaper Rash | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Spending too long in a wet diaper can cause your kid’s bum to break out in spots! Especially in the summer. As any adult who has had a heat rash can attest, it a damp rash can be brutal painful and take a long, long time to heal on its own!

The reason why diaper rash can develop in a hurry is because of bile passed in stool and pH of urine–which can be quite acid–breaks down the oil on our skin that our body exudes as a protective barrier. It also can kill or overwhelm the beneficial bacteria on our skin that protects us from yeast and other infections. On top of it all, disposable diapers can have chemicals in them which just exacerbate the situation.

You can spoon a little corn starch into your hand and rub it on your baby’s bottom to help absorb extra moisture on hot days. Applying it from your hand will reduce the amount flying everywhere, irritating your own and baby’s breathing. Corn starch is the prime ingredient in most baby powder anyway–without the artificial scents! 

If you’ve ever used egg white to make yourself a facial mask, you know how it can dry thin, like a second skin. Painting a little egg white over the worst areas will help give them an extra layer of protection, like a bandaid that can wash off.

Avocados are high in nutrients and good fat! After making lunch out of an avocado for you and little one, rub the discarded skin of the avocado on the rash to promote healing.  

A little live, cultured yogurt on the area can also help keep thrush at bay, reducing secondary infections that make the rash worse!

Calendula oil or ointment is also a common homeopathic treatment for diaper rash.

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The 'Vegetables' Americans Eat Are Pizza and French Fries

The 'Vegetables' Americans Eat Are Pizza and French Fries | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

he way your’e meeting your daily quotient of vegetables is probably a lot less healthy than you think, according to a potentially surprising finding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture

The non-newsworthy headline is that Americans aren’t eating enough vegetables in the first place—an anemic one and a half cups on average per day versus the two to three cups recommended by federal nutrition guidelines.

Duh. Like the fact that we watch too much TV, don’t exercise, and eat too much junk food, our collective aversion to eating our veggies has become a stock item on the litany of explanations for why, when we venture out in public and are surrounded by our lumbering compatriots, it all too often feels like we’re walking onto a cattle feedlot. We’ve heard this one before.

To make matters worse, a lot of the vegetables we are consuming when we deign to eat them aren’t that good for us—or they’re being served up in ways that would make any self-respecting nutritionist shudder.

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Why Coffee and Chocolate Actually Really Good for You

Why Coffee and Chocolate Actually Really Good for You | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it
It has been reported that dark chocolate (not milk or white) is high in beneficial vitamins, antioxidants, and minerals, and that coffee can prevent the onset of many diseases. Until now it was unclear exactly why dark chocolate can lower blood pressure, but this morning the LA Times reported that the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Dallas found that specific microbes in our gut convert a portion of the cocoa into anti-inflammatory compounds. These can be used by our body and can prevent some forms of cardiovascular disease. It was also found that our colon ferments dietary fiber, which makes up 30 percent of cocoa powder.
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Lack of Healthy Diet And Physical Activities May Make You Age Faster

Lack of Healthy Diet And Physical Activities May Make You Age Faster | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Studies have highlighted that an unhealthy diet and a sedentary lifestyle ups the risk of many health issues including obesity, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. According to a new study, it also accelerates the process of cell death, scientifically known as senescence and promotes the release of damaging substances from these dying cells. Senescence has a major role to play in the fundamental process of aging.

Mayo Clinic researchers looked into whether increased exercise could counteract this process, subsequently delaying the process of aging. The study was conducted on mice. One group of mice was fed a fast food diet (FFD) for 5 months while the other group was kept on a chow diet. 


After 5 months, the researchers found that the first group developed many health issues like insulin sensitivity, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired exercise ability and heart dysfunction. When these mice were made to exercise regularly on a spinning wheel, the effects of the poor diet began to reduce and researcher observed improvements in body weight, metabolism, and cardiac function. Researchers also noted a significant reduction in cell senescence and associated inflammation.


"Our data clearly show that poor nutritional choices dramatically accelerate the accumulation of senescent cells, and for the first time, that exercise can prevent or delay this fundamental process of aging.


Despite the need to better understand the role of cellular senescence in aging and disease, our data underscore the profound impact of lifestyle choices on health and successful aging," the authors said in a press release.


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Exercise helped mice to gain back their health after being fed fast food. Just think what it could do for humans!

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Elle 'rebrands feminism' with Mother, Brave and W&K - Media news - Media Week<

Elle 'rebrands feminism' with Mother, Brave and W&K - Media news - Media Week< | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

http://www.mediaweek.co.uk/article/1213955/elle-rebrands-feminism-mother-brave-w-k?utm_content=bufferfbbb7&utm_source=buffer&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=Buffer

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Natural Remedies for Gallstones

Natural Remedies for Gallstones | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it
You can keep your gallbladder by removing gallstones naturally with some effective home herbal remedies and diet as well as lifestyle changes. Before going for surgery, try these natural remedies for gallstones.
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GM Soy Is Scarier Than You Think

GM Soy Is Scarier Than You Think | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Soybeans are the second-largest US crop after corn, covering about a quarter of American farmland. We grow more soybeans than any other country except Brazil. According to the US Department of Agriculture, more than 90 percent of the soybeans churned out on US farms each year are genetically engineered to withstand herbicides, nearly all of them involving one called Roundup. Organic production, by contrast, is marginal—it accounts for less than 1 percent of total American acreage devoted to soy. (The remaining 9 percent or so of soybeans are conventionally grown, but not genetically modified.)

Americans don't eat much of these lime-green legumes directly, but that doesn't mean we're not exposed to them. After harvest, the great bulk of soybeans are crushed and divided into two parts: meal, which mainly goes into feed for animals that become our meat, and fat, most of which ends up being used as cooking oil or in food products. According to the US Soy Board, soy accounts for 61 percent of American's vegetable oil consumption.

Given soy's centrality to our food and agriculture systems, the findings of a new study published in the peer-reviewed journal Food Chemistry are worth pondering. The authors found that Monsanto's ubiquitous Roundup Ready soybeans, engineered to withstand its own blockbuster herbicide, contain more herbicide residues than their non-GMO counterparts. The team also found that the GM beans are nutritionally inferior.

In the study, the researchers looked at samples of three kinds of soybeans grown in Iowa: (1) those grown from GM herbicide-tolerant seeds; (2) those grown from non-GM seeds but in a conventional, agrichemical-based farming regime; and (3) organic soybeans, i.e., non-GM and grown without agrichemicals.

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Antioxidants and How They Protect Your Health

Antioxidants and How They Protect Your Health | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

When oxygen is consumed by the cells in our body, free radical cells are naturally formed. These free radicals run around and try to join packs to stay strong and once they have a big enough gang, they start hanging out in our muscles so they can get some free food as our blood tries to deliver nutrients to our organs. These free radicals are molecules that have a missing electron and they are trying hard to find a spare electron or steal electrons from vital cell structures in our body. When they do steal an electron from other essential cells in our body, they cause damage and done long enough and persistently they can even cause diseases.


If free radicals gang up and accumulate, they get stronger and start damaging tissues and even the DNA of our cells. Cooking at high temperatures (specially fried onions, and fried burgers and fries), environmental pollutions, smoking, excessive alcohol, and unprotected sun exposure to ultraviolet light from the sun, and stress can all contribute to the formation of free radicals hell bent on damaging our body through stealing electrons from other essential cells.

The entire function of our body, from birth onwards, is to create new cells to replace older cells. This keeps us young and healthy and growing. When our body is subjected to excessive amounts of cell damage caused by free radicals, then we start to catch colds, be more susceptible to flues, and even worse, more prone to chronic diseases.

Antioxidants can help us dramatically and relatively quickly when cell damage is taking place. These angels donate electrons so that free radicals don’t steel electrons from other essential cells in our body. Once free radicals get an electron, their molecular structure changes and become able to contribute rather than be a nuisance or cause harm.  Nutrients like beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E, are all antioxidants that block cell damage by keeping you healthy and help keep your cell reproduction and rejuvenation for a younger looking skin for much longer.

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Is Butter Secretly Ruining Your Health?

Is Butter Secretly Ruining Your Health? | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

Growing up, butter was an absolute staple in my household. We thankfully never got into the margarine craze because my mother believed that butter was good for the brain. Turns out, she was right about that and scientists have now concluded that butter is actually good for you in other areas too. It’s high in a compound call CLA that protects you from tumor growth and cancer, is not inflammatory like man-made oils from corn, canola or soy, and provides a nice dose of Omega 3 fatty acids, if you get it from the right source. But finding the right source can be tricky given all the buzz words and fancy marketing these days. Choosing the wrong type of butter can secretly ruin your health without you even knowing it! Here’s a look at what’s really going on and how to choose the healthiest butter for you and your family. 

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Homemade Ginger Beer Recipe | Epicurious.com

Homemade Ginger Beer Recipe | Epicurious.com | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it
Unlike supermarket ginger ales, which are made with carbonated water, corn syrup, and ginger flavoring, this spicy ginger beer is made the old-fashioned way, with lots of fresh grated ginger, sugar, yeast, and water. As the yeast ferments over a day or so, it creates a natural carbonation. Though many recipes leave the ginger sediment as is, we think straining it out produces a more refined quaff. For a different route to a similar drink, go to Homemade Ginger Ale. Ingredients About 1/4 pound ginger, peeled 1 cup sugar 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1/4 teaspoon active dry yeast About 2 quarts water Equipment: a Microplane grater; a funnel; a clean 2-liter plastic bottle with cap Preparation Grate enough ginger using Microplane to measure 3 1/2 tablespoons, then put in a fine-mesh sieve set over a bowl to collect juice, pressing on solids and then discarding. Place funnel in neck of bottle and pour in 3 tablespoons ginger juice (reserve any remaining for another use). Add sugar, lemon juice, yeast, and a pinch of salt. Fill bottle with water, leaving about 1 1/2 inches of space at top. Remove funnel and screw cap on tightly. Gently shake bottle to dissolve sugar. Let stand at room temperature until plastic feels hard and no longer indents when squeezed, 24 to 36 hours. Chill ginger beer until very cold. Cooks’ Note: Ginger beer keeps, chilled, 1 week.
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Should You Take Vitamin D Supplements?

Should You Take Vitamin D Supplements? | Health & Fitness | Scoop.it

My hunch is that it depends. Vitamin D is a nutrient that helps our bodies regulate the metabolism of calcium and phosphate (1). Most vitamin D comes from sunlight, while it is also found in certain foods including fatty fish, mushrooms, egg yolks, vitamin-D fortified foods. For example, milk in many countries is always fortified with vitamin D, and some brands of breakfast cereals and orange juice are fortified as well (2).  Vitamin D can also be obtained through taking vitamin D supplements found at your local grocery or health food store. The classic health consequences of inadequate vitamin D are rickets in children, and low bone mineral density and osteoporosis in older adults (3). Low vitamin D has also been associated with increased risk for many other health conditions including breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer, multiple sclerosis, and cardiovascular disease (4-6). However, the quality of scientific evidence for these relationships varies because it is actually quite challenging methodologically to study the cause-effect relationship of vitamin D on health.

Because definitive high-quality evidence is lacking, the actual beneficial effect of vitamin D on health has been heavily debated in recent years. Like many other dietary or lifestyle factors that have been linked to health outcomes with scientific uncertainty (examples: coffee, alcohol, vitamin C, herbal supplements), the available information about whether to take vitamin D supplements can be very confusing. Here is where we stand right now:

In 2011, the American Institute of Medicine released an expert report on the dietary reference intakes for vitamin D (3). They stated that, for people aged 1 to 70 years old including pregnant and lactating women, the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) is 600 IU per day of vitamin D. For adults aged over 70 years the RDA is 800 IU per day. Intake should not exceed 4000 IU per day for people aged 9 years and over. The full RDA guidelines can be found here. Interestingly, their expert panel concluded that current scientific evidence is insufficient to conclude that vitamin D plays a causal role in non-bone-related health conditions (3). Now, this statement may or may not mean that vitamin D has no effect on health aside from bone conditions, simply that our current knowledge is insufficient.

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