Health Equity
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Health Disparities, Health Equity, Health Psychology
Curated by bacigalupe
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Seven lessons for smarter interventions

Seven lessons for smarter interventions | Health Equity | Scoop.it
What makes for a good buy in global health? Panelists at an event cosponsored by PATH tell all.
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Urban-Think Tank develops housing prototype for South African slums

Urban-Think Tank develops housing prototype for South African slums | Health Equity | Scoop.it
Urban-Think Tank has designed and built a prototypical house as part of an initiative to improve housing conditions for slum dwellers across South Africa.
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Analysis Of Teladoc Use Seems To Indicate Expanded Access To Care For Patients Without Prior Connection To A Provider

Analysis Of Teladoc Use Seems To Indicate Expanded Access To Care For Patients Without Prior Connection To A Provider | Health Equity | Scoop.it
bacigalupe's insight:

Despite the potential benefits of telehealth applications, little is known about their overall impact on care. This is critical because rising health care costs and a shortage of primary care providers make it likely that telehealth services will play an increasingly important role in health care delivery. To help fill this gap in knowledge, we describe early experiences with Teladoc, one of the largest telemedicine providers in the United States, which provides care directly to patients over the telephone or via the Internet. We analyzed claims data for a large California agency serving public employees that recently offered Teladoc as a covered service. The 3,701 Teladoc “visits” we studied were for a broad range of diagnostic categories, the most common of which were acute respiratory conditions, urinary tract infections, and skin problems. Compared to patients who visited a physician’s office for a similar condition, adult Teladoc users were younger and less likely to have used health care before the introduction of Teladoc. Patients who used Teladoc were less likely to have a follow-up visit to any setting, compared to those patients who visited a physician’s office or emergency department. Teladoc appears to be expanding access to patients who are not connected to other providers. Future research should assess the impact of Teladoc and other telehealth interventions on the quality and cost of care.

 
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JAMA Network | JAMA | Redesigning Hospital Alarms for Patient Safety:  Alarmed and Potentially Dangerous

bacigalupe's insight:

Because hospital alarms alert clinicians to deviations from a defined normal state, these auditory and visual signals are designed to improve patient safety. Contemporary alarms are diverse, ranging from devices that monitor heart rate to those that sound when patients try to leave their beds. Indeed, it is difficult to imagine modern health care without these electronic sentinels of safety.

Despite their benefits, alarms may also increase the possibility of harm. In a sentinel event alert, the Joint Commission called medical alarms a “frequent and persistent” patient safety problem and designated them 2014 National Patient Safety Goal No. 6 following reports of several alarm-associated deaths.1 Since 2010, the nonprofit ECRI Institute has also rated alarm problems among the top 10 health technology hazards, recently calling them “the number one medical hazard of 2014.”2 Notably, because alarm-associated adverse events are voluntarily reported, the true magnitude of this problem might exceed published estimates. Why may this technology have resulted in adverse outcomes?

Like many innovations, alarms were first developed to provide benefit to an exceedingly small group of high-risk patients. Because clinical events and hemodynamic alterations often presaged harm in this population, alarms were successful at averting complications. Encouraged by these benefits, the medical community expanded this model to other low-risk populations. The consequence of this well-intentioned generalization is epitomized in the din of chirps, beeps, bells, and gongs that typify hospitals today. It is thus not surprising that concerns regarding safety have emerged, even in populations for whom these protective devices were once considered most valuable.3

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Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos - DATA

The Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) is a multi-center epidemiologic study in Hispanic/Latino populations to determine the role of acculturation in the prevalence and development of disease, and to identify risk factors playing a protective or harmful role in Hispanics/Latinos.
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What is the main cause of the primary care crisis?

What is the main cause of the primary care crisis? | Health Equity | Scoop.it
With little time to listen and think, the action step of many PCPs, as with the patient described last time, is to send the patient to a specialist.
bacigalupe's insight:

Primary care physicians (PCPs) have too little time per patient which means too many referrals to specialists, too little time listening and thinking, no time to delve into the stress or emotional causes of many symptoms and substantial frustration by PCP and patient alike.

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APA Center for Psychology and Health briefing document highlights psychology’s role in managing chronic pain

APA Center for Psychology and Health briefing document highlights psychology’s role in managing chronic pain | Health Equity | Scoop.it
Newest health care briefing sheet shows how psychological interventions are an alternative to drugs and surgery for many people experiencing chronic pain.
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Behavioral Health Barometer, 2013|SAMHSA

Behavioral Health Barometer, 2013|SAMHSA | Health Equity | Scoop.it
Presents a set of substance use and mental health indicators from population and treatment facility-based data sets. Provides point-in-time and trend data reflecting the status and progress in improving key behavioral health indicators.
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Presents a set of substance use and mental health indicators from population and treatment facility-based data sets. Provides point-in-time and trend data reflecting the status and progress in improving key behavioral health indicators.

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Protection of Human Subjects in Behavioral and Social Sciences

Protection of Human Subjects in Behavioral and Social Sciences | Health Equity | Scoop.it
Protection of Human Subjects in Behavioral and Social Sciences
bacigalupe's insight:

This new report from the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences, is the product of a consensus study to inform the efforts of the federal government in revising regulations (the “Common Rule”) that protect human participants in research. Several of the proposals put forth by the Department of Health and Human Services in their July 2011 Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) were endorsed by the committee. Within the context of social and behavioral sciences the committee recommends revising the Common Rule and amending specific proposals in the ANPRM in relation to, for example, key definitions (human subjects research and minimal risk), categories of review required by Institutional Review Boards, and consent processes. The committee also offers examples and strategies for operationalizing the proposed new procedures.

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Kandy Woodfield's curator insight, February 1, 2014 7:11 PM

Really important changes  to common framework  for ethics, has implications for soc sci research, may translate to UK in the future.

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The Built Environment and Children’s Health

children's health, built environment, asthma, obesity, heart disease, play, biking, walking, child care, sidewalks, healthy community,
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Public Health Infographic - American Public Health Association

bacigalupe's insight:

Obesity is a serious and costly health problem facing our nation. The number of kids and teens who are obese has nearly tripled in the past three decades, leading to a generation at risk for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and other serious health problems. However, there is hope. For the first time in recent years, obesity rates have declined. Innovative public health approaches and partnerships are contributing to improved food choices and creating opportunities for physical activity, helping to curb obesity. We must continue to fund public health programs to ensure healthy futures for all of our nation’s children.

Share this infographic widely and use it as an example when talking to your members of Congress and other policymakers about the importance of strong public health funding.

 

- See more at: http://action.apha.org/site/PageServer?pagename=Obesity_Infographic#sthash.gA0X0IiK.dpuf

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Transforming Lives, Enhancing Communities — Innovations in Global Mental Health — NEJM

Transforming Lives, Enhancing Communities — Innovations in Global Mental Health — NEJM | Health Equity | Scoop.it
Perspective from The New England Journal of Medicine — Transforming Lives, Enhancing Communities — Innovations in Global Mental Health
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'Superfoods' - another battleground between marketing and common sense

'Superfoods' - another battleground between marketing and common sense | Health Equity | Scoop.it
Over the previous weekend the morning magazine shows I have on during lazy mornings had 2 glamorous nutritionist types breathlessly discussing the latest ‘superfoods’ that would be big in 2014.
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Narrative Medicine: How Listening Heals

Narrative Medicine: How Listening Heals | Health Equity | Scoop.it
Recent data show that a patient gets to speak for an average of 12-15 seconds before a doctor interrupts. The practice of narrative medicine, which favors listening to patients' histories and feelings, has seen a resurgence in recent years. In this hour of All Sides, we'll explore the surprising ways in which stories can heal the body.
bacigalupe's insight:

 11:00

Recent data show that a patient gets to speak for an average of 12-15 seconds before a doctor interrupts. The practice of narrative medicine, which favors listening to patients, finding the story behind an illness, and fostering empathy, has seen a resurgence in recent years. In this hour of All Sides, we’ll explore the surprising ways in which stories can heal the body.

GuestsDavid Small, author of the graphic novel StitchesDave Filipi, Director of Film and Video Arts at the Wexner Center for the ArtsJohn Vaughn,  doctor at OSU Student Health Services and Narrative Medicine conference organizer

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On the hazards of significance testing. Part 1: the screening problem

On the hazards of significance testing. Part 1: the screening problem | Health Equity | Scoop.it
This post is about why screening healthy people is generally a bad idea. It is the first in a series of posts on the hazards of statistics.
bacigalupe's insight:

This post is about why screening healthy people is generally a bad idea. It is the first in a series of posts on the hazards of statistics.

There is nothing new about it, but the problems are consistently ignored by people who suggest screening tests, and by journals that promote their work. It seems that it can’t be said often enough.

The reason is that most screening tests give a large number of false positives. If your test comes out positive, your chance of actually having the disease is almost always quite small. False positive tests cause alarm, and they may do real harm, when they lead to unnecessary surgery or other treatments.

Tests for Alzheimer’s disease have been in the news a lot recently. They make a good example, if only because it’s hard to see what good comes of being told early on that you might get Alzheimer’s later when there are no good treatments that can help with that news. But worse still, the news you are given is usually wrong anyway.

Consider a recent paper that described a test for "mild cognitive impairment" (MCI), a condition that may, but often isn’t, a precursor of Alzheimer’s disease. The 15-minute test was published in the Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences by Scharre et al (2014). The test sounded pretty good. It had a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 80%.

 

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21 Microaggressions in Photos

21 Microaggressions in Photos | Health Equity | Scoop.it
Our fellow APA blog for graduate psychology students, GradPsych Blog, has a great post up about the various types of microaggressions faced by students at university. We have cross-posted it below:...
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WHO/Europe | Publications - Governance for health equity in the ...

WHO/Europe | Publications - Governance for health equity in the ... | Health Equity | Scoop.it
SEE Health Network Secretariat. The South-eastern Europe Health Network, ... WHO/Europe | Publications - Governance for health equity in the WHO European Region. WHO/Europe | Publications - Governance for health ...
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Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos - Home Page

Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos - Home Page | Health Equity | Scoop.it
The Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) is a multi-center epidemiologic study in Hispanic/Latino populations to determine the role of acculturation in the prevalence and development of disease, and to identify risk factors playing a protective or harmful role in Hispanics/Latinos.
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Stress in America Press Room

Stress in America Press Room | Health Equity | Scoop.it
Press releases and survey information on the Stress in America report. The Stress in America survey measures attitudes and perceptions of stress among the general public, identifies leading sources of stress, and common behaviors used to manage stress and the impact of stress on our lives.
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All psychologies are indigenous psychologies: Reflections on psychology in a global era

All psychologies are indigenous psychologies: Reflections on psychology in a global era | Health Equity | Scoop.it
Understanding psychology as indigenous to the contexts in which is developed and in which it operates may help forge a new conception of the role of culture.
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When I'm 64

When I'm 64 | Health Equity | Scoop.it
By 2030 there will be about 70 million people in the United States who are older than 64. Approximately 26 percent of these will be racial and ethnic minorities. Overall, the older population will be more diverse and better educated than their earlier cohorts. The range of late-life outcomes is very dramatic with old age being a significantly different experience for financially secure and well-educated people than for poor and uneducated people. The early mission of behavioral science research focused on identifying problems of older adults, such as isolation, caregiving, and dementia. Today, the field of gerontology is more ...
bacigalupe's insight:

By 2030 there will be about 70 million people in the United States who are older than 64. Approximately 26 percent of these will be racial and ethnic minorities. Overall, the older population will be more diverse and better educated than their earlier cohorts. The range of late-life outcomes is very dramatic with old age being a significantly different experience for financially secure and well-educated people than for poor and uneducated people. The early mission of behavioral science research focused on identifying problems of older adults, such as isolation, caregiving, and dementia. Today, the field of gerontology is more interdisciplinary.

 

[...]

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ICTMN Exclusive: NCAI Releases R-word Video Ahead of Super Bowl

ICTMN Exclusive: NCAI Releases R-word Video Ahead of Super Bowl | Health Equity | Scoop.it
ICTMN Exclusive: NCAI Releases R-word Video Ahead of Super Bowl
bacigalupe's insight:

Just days before Super Bowl XXLVII, the NCAI is reminding Americans that Native people are not mascots.

 
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Civic Media Session: "Design for Vulnerable Populations" | MIT Video

Civic Media Session: "Design for Vulnerable Populations" | MIT Video | Health Equity | Scoop.it
Designers often want to help people that they perceive as being in need -- whether those affected by natural or human-caused disasters, the economically or physically disadvantaged, or ...
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The unidentified cause of one man's hypertension: Racism

The unidentified cause of one man's hypertension: Racism | Health Equity | Scoop.it
Maybe taking white men’s medicine -- drugs developed by one’s oppressors -- raises blood pressure.
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The Patient’s Side of Lifesaving Treatments

The Patient’s Side of Lifesaving Treatments | Health Equity | Scoop.it
More and more patients struggle daily with the side effects of the very treatments that keep them alive.
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