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Eat to Beat Cancer? Just Wondering...

Eat to Beat Cancer? Just Wondering... | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
Dr. William Li provides an enthusiastic endorsement, on his Eat to Beat Cancer website, to what your mother said, "Eat your vegetables."
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

Can we eat to beat cancer?  That's the gazillion dollar question...what do you think?

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Burden of Bills: Living With Cancer in the US

Burden of Bills: Living With Cancer in the US | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
I also know that the sooner I die, the more money my family will have. ~from the post Why Advocate? ...
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

On hearing the word “cancer” from your physician, your first thoughts are naturally on treatment. Unfortunately and sometimes tragically, in the US, finances need to be a top priority as well.

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Too Young for Colorectal Cancer?

Too Young for Colorectal Cancer? | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
What happens when someone younger than 50 has symptoms for colorectal cancer (CRC)? Read Danielle Ripley-Burgess' story of having CRC twice--at 17 and 25.
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

Important story about important of #screening for younger people!

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The Empowered Patient

The Empowered Patient | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
Interview on The Empowered Patient podcast with Tal Givoly, CEO of Medivizor on empowering people.
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Is Health Insurance the New Car Insurance? | Legacy DNA Marketing Group

Is Health Insurance the New Car Insurance? | Legacy DNA Marketing Group | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
What do you think? Will lifestyle choices be graded like driving behavior-accruing points (as with car insurance) resulting in larger health insurance premiums?
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Cancer Research and Money: Financing Hope

Cancer Research and Money: Financing Hope | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
Share Cancer Research and Money Funding has been stagnant for years– that’s what the fact sheet of the National Cancer Institute says.  This is the federal agency charged with finding a cure for cancer through research.  The $4.9 billion per year is spread across a spectrum of cancer investigations, each cancer getting a designated amount. What …
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

#Funding for #cancerresearch is stagnant! For the Love of a #Child!

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As I lay dying

As I lay dying | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
I am dying, literally, at my home in Hollywood, of metastatic breast cancer, the only kind of breast cancer that kills. For six years I've known I was going to die. I just didn't know when.
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

Laurie Becklund explains the need for #BigData involvement in #breastcancer research.  She also identifies #KomenFoundation 

#awareness campaign as painfully out of date & points to the tiny amount of  #donation #money going to research,

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What Do Teeth Have to do with Hearts? Dental Health Month

What Do Teeth Have to do with Hearts? Dental Health Month | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
What do teeth have to do with hearts, joints, brains? A lot according to research. Dental health month reminds us of the connections.
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

#Teeth, #joints, #brains and #hearts have a lot to do with each other.  Read more 

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Diabetes patients who use digital tools self-report better health - Survey

Diabetes patients who use digital tools self-report better health - Survey | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it

New survey data from digital health agency Klick Health shows that diabetes patients who use digital tools to manage their health also feel healthier.

 

Klick Health employed Survey Sampling International (SSI) to poll 2,000 American adults with diabetes either online or via the telephone.

 

Based on responses about how they use technology to manage their health, they segmented the group into three categories: those who manage their health daily or weekly with integrated digital technologies (integrators), those who go online to seek health information on a monthly basis (seekers), and those who don’t use the internet to manage their health at all (traditionalists).

 

The integrators group, the true digital health users, made up just 18 percent of the sample, but 13 percent of integrators reported being in excellent health. Seekers made up 47 percent of the sample and 4 percent of seekers said they were in excellent health. Finally, the remaining 35 percent were traditionalists, and only 2 percent of that group reported being in excellent health. 

 

Because it’s a survey based on self-reported health status, the data doesn’t prove that connected patients are actually healthier than non-connected patients. But it does provide evidence that either they’re healthier or they believe they’re healthier, which is significant in and of itself.

 

Nineteen percent of patients reported using mobile technology for a health-related activity. Of these, most wanted more data-driven interactions with their doctors. Two-thirds said they would like an app to remind them to take their medication, 75 percent wanted apps to connect them with their doctors, and 78 percent were open to sharing personally-collected health data with their doctors.

 

Overall, 80 percent of the mobile connected group were interested in having an app recommended to them by their doctor.



more at http://mobihealthnews.com/40600/survey-diabetes-patients-who-use-digital-tools-self-report-better-health/



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Etain Limited's curator insight, February 17, 8:47 AM

It's so great to see the digital revolution hailing these really personal advances that make such a huge difference to everyday people like you and me.

 

More and more we're seeing the humble app, smart phones and wearable technology become not a just fashionable lifestyle choice, or some kind of expendable income indicator, but as genuine quality of life improvers. Before long we'll all be wearing watches and other gadgets that read our vitals, measure the mineral content of our sweat, track changes in our core temperature.... then when we're under the weather and looking for a Doctors appoint, at the touch of a button all that data will be winging it's way to our GPs! Giving them a heads up on our condition, allowing them to diagnose and treat us more effectively. Now who wouldn't want that?

Diabète 's curator insight, February 17, 9:59 AM

le rôle des médecins dans la recommandation des applications clairement mis en lumière ...un article relevé par Rémy Teston 

Daerden Elena's curator insight, March 10, 10:19 AM

HEALTHCARE TECHNOLOGY

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16 Insights From WorldWide Chat on Health Information Seeking

16 Insights From WorldWide Chat on Health Information Seeking | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
Tal Givoly, CEO of Medivizor, moderated a Doctors20 tweetchat on health information seeking after a diagnosis. Here are 16 insights from the worldwide chat.
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

Amazing activists in the #patient and #physician community provide important insights on online health information seeking!

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Big Ideas: The Cancer Card Xchange

Big Ideas: The Cancer Card Xchange | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
Each year, you probably have at least one holiday or birthday gift you’re sure to re-gift. It could be that twentieth “empty book”—you know the lined journal that everyone thinks you have the time and energy to fill that sits unused on your bookshelf. It might also be a gift card to a store, cinema or restaurant that you don’t frequent. It’s amazing to learn that that 40 percent of people who receive gift cards don’t use their full value. In fact, it’s been estimated that between 2005 and 2011, $41 billion worth of gift cards were never used. That’s free money in the bank for those businesses. When Emily Tickle Thomas heard about all of those wasted gift cards, she saw an opportunity: to put that “free money” to work for people who could really use it, and enable people to re-gift without guilt. It has since become her mission to see those gift cards used by people who need them…people with cancer. Emily, the mother of four boys, is a cancer survivor and knows what a gift card can do to brighten a day and lighten the load.   In 2007, Emily was diagnosed with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Her Memphis-based physicians referred her to MD Anderson in Houston for treatment. During her treatment, friends bought a gift card to a popular restaurant in the Houston area.   Memories of that kind gift and the much-needed respite from the drudgery of treatment motivated her to found The Cancer Card Xchange. “It’s snowballed into something bigger than we could have ever imagined,” Emily said in a recent radio interview.   “Everyone knows someone with cancer, everyone wants to do something to help…It has taken off…” Since its beginning in 2011, The Cancer Card Xchange has given over $125,000 worth of gift cards to 1,351 cancer patients.  In personal correspondence, Emily stated, “The Cancer Card Xchange is a small nonprofit run from a home office with no paid staff at this point.  We depend 100 percent on donations …We send gifts to verified cancer patients as donations are available.” In fact, there is a waiting list of patients who want and/or need gift cards. The cards that are most desired by patients are from national retailers, gas stations, drug stores and restaurants, however, The Cancer Card Xchange accepts all gift cards, “We usually can find an appropriate recipient for almost any donated gift card,” Emily [...]
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But You Don’t Look Sick…

But You Don’t Look Sick… | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
If you have a chronic disease, you’ve probably heard this before. Theatrical training may not be on your resume, but you are an actor: acting like a healthy person when, in fact, you feel awful. In 2010 Christine Miserandino wrote a blog post called The Spoon Theory. In the post, Christine describes trying to help her best friend understand what it really feels like to live with Lupus. She asks her friend to hold 12 spoons and tells her that the spoons are Lupus. Then Christine asks her friend to describe her day. With each activity, like getting up out of bed or getting dressed, her friend loses a spoon. With the limited number of spoons, her friend must choose what activities she will engage in over the course of the day. As a healthy person, her friend never has to think about how she will portion out her spoons because she has an unlimited amount of spoons. Christine wrote, “When I saw her upset, I knew maybe I was getting through to her. I didn’t want my friend to be upset, but at the same time I was happy to think finally maybe someone understood me a little bit. She had tears in her eyes and asked quietly ‘Christine, How do you do it? Do you really do this everyday?’ I explained that some days were worse then others; some days I have more spoons then most. But I can never make it go away and I can’t forget about it, I always have to think about it. I handed her a spoon I had been holding in reserve. I said simply, ‘I have learned to live life with an extra spoon in my pocket, in reserve. You need to always be prepared.’” Christine’s The Spoon Theory post resonates with many people. Almost 3,000 people have commented on it. She has received over 129,000 likes on her Facebook “Spoonie” community page. There is even a “Spoonie” chat on Twitter,and people are wearing spoons. Understanding illness can be difficult for people who are healthy. Visual tools, like the spoons, help. In fact, this particular type of visual aid can improve people’s appreciation of their good health: because they do not have to count spoons. And, it can help healthy loved ones see what a gift it is for someone with a chronic illness to spend time with them. “I give [...]
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After Discharge With Stroke

After Discharge With Stroke | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
Share “I had a terrible headache for two days and very seldom had headache – …once a year tops.  I took my kids and Sharon to see [a] movie…and at the end…I got up…collapsed and I do not [know] what happened to me.” ~John Anderson Stroke Stroke is one of the most common causes of death …
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

What's happening to #stroke #survivors with regard to #rehabilitation access, #healthinsurance coverage?

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"I Have Brown Eyes and I Have Lupus"

"I Have Brown Eyes and I Have Lupus" | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
At 15, Amanda Greene worried the symptoms she experienced were all in her mind, but she was wrong. "I have brown eyes and I have lupus." Lupus explained.
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

Diagnosed at 15, Amanda says, "I have brown eyes and I have Lupus"...For Amanda, “the diagnosis was a relief. My stepbrothers had been calling me a hypochondriac. I was glad to know that ‘it was not in my head.’” 
http://medivizor.com/blog/2015/04/14/brown-eyes-lupus/
But You Don't Look Sick, life with lupus!

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Miracles of Technology

Miracles of Technology | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it

The miracles of technology bring a smile and hope in the winter doldrums. Watch these videos and know that Spring is around the corner.

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Cancer Research and Money: Financing Hope

Cancer Research and Money: Financing Hope | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
Share Cancer Research and Money Funding has been stagnant for years– that’s what the fact sheet of the National Cancer Institute says.  This is the federal agency charged with finding a cure for cancer through research.  The $4.9 billion per year is spread across a spectrum of cancer investigations, each cancer getting a designated amount. What …
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Healthcare Services Marketing: How the Four P’s Become Seven P’s | Legacy DNA Marketing Group

Healthcare Services Marketing: How the Four P’s Become Seven P’s | Legacy DNA Marketing Group | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
From traditional to service marketing: how adding physical evidence, people, and process to the four P's (price, product, promotion, place) yields relationship.
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

#Healthcare #Services #Marketing=>How the 4 P's of marketing become 7 P's 

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Guest Post: Gastroparesis Another "But You Don't Look Sick" Disease

Guest Post: Gastroparesis Another "But You Don't Look Sick" Disease | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
Gastroparesis [GP] is a serious disorder in which the stomach does not empty its contents into the small intestines. Normally, ...
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

Life with another "but you don't look sick" disorder Gastroparesis

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Heroes in Our Midst: Linda Young

Heroes in Our Midst: Linda Young | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
What makes a hero? In a previous story, Donald Washer finds financial assistance for patients. He does not take “no” for an answer. We believe his actions are heroic. Below is another profile of a Hero in Our Midst: Linda Young. “Nurses may not be angels, but they are the next best thing.” ~anonymous patient “Improving outcomes, one relationship at a time” is Axium Healthcare Pharmacy’s motto. However, it isn’t just a motto; it is a tenet that guides work being done by people like Linda Young. Linda is a Disease Management Nurse at Axium. Relationships are what Linda Young is all about. “When I first talk with a new patient, chances are this is an entirely new experience for them. They have no idea what is happening to their body and have been given so much information from their medical professional that they’re usually unable to grasp what has happened.” That’s where Linda’s experience as a nurse comes in. “My job is to assess their new health issues, but my most important role is to first make them comfortable so they are not afraid to ask questions that they feel they can’t ask their doctor.” Just out of high school, Linda tried cosmetology but realized after passing the state boards that “it was not for me.” She moved back in with her parents and got a job at a small 25-bed hospital as a nursing assistant. “I immediately fell in love with the work. I was so amazed at what the doctors and nurses did there.Since it was such a small hospital, all the doctors enjoyed teaching us about medicine.” A couple of years later, Linda attended nursing school. “I have been going full speed ahead ever since and never looked back.” Linda enjoys the diversity of the work in nursing. “I’ve been a nurse in the hospital working in the ER, ICU, medical, surgical, pediatrics, and labor and delivery. I worked in an MD office where the physician taught me how to do assessments. After that, I moved on to outpatient rehabilitation, wound care, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment for various illnesses.” This wealth of experience and knowledge is an incredible asset to her present workplace, Axium. “Nearly four years ago I discovered Axium Healthcare Pharmacy. I knew very little about the specialty pharmacy business at that time…the work has truly been a gift for me. Not only do [...]
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

Unsung heroes in healthcare! 

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Cancer Immunotherapy: Infographic

Cancer Immunotherapy: Infographic | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
An infographic describing the cancer treatment called cancer immunotherapy.
Kathleen D. Hoffman, PhD's insight:

#Immunotherapy explained in graphic form! #cancer #treatments

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Tuberculosis rate going down, but not fast enough to meet WHO target

Tuberculosis rate going down, but not fast enough to meet WHO target | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
India is unlikely to reach the WHO target of elimination of tuberculosis (TB) by 2050 going by the rate at which incidence of the disease is declining in the country.

Via Axshya Alerts
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Language on Twitter Tracks Rates of Coronary Heart Disease

Language on Twitter Tracks Rates of Coronary Heart Disease | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it

Twitter can serve as a dashboard indicator of a community’s psychological well-being and can predict county-level rates of heart disease, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of theAssociation for Psychological Science.

 

Previous studies have identified many factors that contribute to the risk of heart disease, including behavioral factors like smoking and psychological factors like stress.

 

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania demonstrated that Twitter can capture more information about heart disease risk than many traditional factors combined, as it also characterizes the psychological atmosphere of a community.

 

The findings show that expressions of negative emotions such as anger, stress, and fatigue in the tweets from people in a given county were associated with higher heart disease risk in that county. On the other hand, expressions of positive emotions like excitement and optimism were associated with lower risk.

 

The results suggest that using Twitter as a window into a community’s collective mental state may provide a useful tool in epidemiology:

 more at http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/twitter-usage-can-predict-rates-of-coronary-heart-disease.html 
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Healing Medicine With Stories

Healing Medicine With Stories | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
An innovative project, The Health Story Collaborative, puts doctors and patients on camera and on stage. Their mission? Healing Medicine with Stories.
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New Year's 2015

New Year's 2015 | Health Communication and Social Media | Scoop.it
Celebrating the New Year with dropping pickles, carp kissing and New Year's resolutions...how about a new tradition...choose 3 words as guideposts for 2015.
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