Digital Health
Follow
Find
92.5K views | +163 today
 
Scooped by Alex Butler
onto Digital Health
Scoop.it!

Scientific communications in the modern age | DigitallySick

Scientific communications in the modern age | DigitallySick | Digital Health | Scoop.it

The vastly changed communicaions landscape has revolutionised scientific communications, from what constitutes peer reviewed reseach, through to study design, dissemination of information and research collaboration. It is also challenging the very existance of the medical conference itself.

 

In this pod Len Starnes joins the team and takes a look at what this means for the healthcare community broadly and for pharma specifically.

 

As Len Starnes puts it: 'the medical conference is dead. long live the medical conference'. 

more...
No comment yet.
Digital Health
The intersection between health and digital technology will herald a revolution for patients, healthcare professionals and pharmaceutical companies
Curated by Alex Butler
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

"The Healthcare revolution will not be televised"

My Presentation from Athens looking at 5 things digital can do to revolutionise pharmaceuticals (with a bit of Gil Scott Heron thrown in for good measure)

more...
Sophie Undreiner's curator insight, March 15, 2014 5:23 AM

@TedMed par Alex Butler

Vigisys's curator insight, November 2, 2014 5:10 AM

Une intéressante présentation (en anglais) qui aborde les principaux concepts qui seront fondateurs de l'e-santé à venir. Une belle inspiration pour le développement des futurs réseaux de santé numériques.

Harry Edwards's comment, June 8, 1:57 AM
Buy medical equipment products online , guaranteed lowest prices at online medical equipment store. We supply medical products in wholesale price across USA
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Quest Diagnostics, HealthTap Launch Virtual Diagnostic Testing for Healthcare Consumers

Quest Diagnostics, HealthTap Launch Virtual Diagnostic Testing for Healthcare Consumers | Digital Health | Scoop.it
HealthTap announced on Tuesday a new collaboration with Quest Diagnostics that will enable doctors to order diagnostic testing services for patients through HealthTap’s virtual care platform.


We’re told that this is the first ever partnership between a major national medical laboratory provider and an end-to-end virtual care company.
The end result? The effort will enable doctors and consumers to access a broad range of diagnostic service options to help care for patients in a virtual setting.


“Our mission is to help billions everywhere live healthier, happier lives,” a provided statement reads. “Today we pass a significant milestone in enabling the most comprehensive access to health-related information available, including lab testing, results, and doctor evaluations, right from the convenience of a mobile device or personal computer”


Through the collaboration, HealthTap’s network of doctors will be able to order laboratory testing for patients who seek virtual consults via HealthTap.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Watson’s next feat? Taking on cancer

Watson’s next feat? Taking on cancer | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Story by Ariana Eunjung Cha Published on June 27, 2015HoustonCandida Vitale and the other fellows at MD Anderson’s leukemia treatment center had known one another for only a few months, but they already were very tight. The nine of them shared a small office and were always hanging out on weekends.But she wasn’t quite sure what to make of the new guy. Rumor had it that he had finished med school in two years and had a photographic memory of thousands of journal articles and relevant clinical trials. When the fellows were asked to summarize patients’ records for the senior faculty in the mornings, he always seemed to have the best answers.“I was surprised,” said Vitale, a 31-year-old who received her MD in Italy. “Even if you work all night, it would be impossible to be able to put this much information together like that.” brain is everybody everywhere. It “the I’vehad.”)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Google health wristband is more than a "me too" wearable

Google health wristband is more than a "me too" wearable | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Google announced last week that they’ve developed a clinical grade health tracking wristband for use in medical research and clinical trials. In other words, the Google health wristband won’t show up on Amazon or in Walgreens. And that’s one of the most interesting things about it.

News of the device has been widely reported, generally with enthusiasm. Details on the device, developed out of the Google X group, are still scant however and it seems to be in relatively early phases of validation. According to Bloomberg, the device will measure heart rate, heart rhythm and skin temperature. It will also capture environmental information like light exposure and noise levels.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Google has competition in crowdsourcing public health

Google has competition in crowdsourcing public health | Digital Health | Scoop.it
BuzzFeed, that ridiculously profitable bastion of clickbait and quizzes all your Facebook friends annoy you with actually has real journalists and an investigative division, and once in a while, along comes something that’s truly newsworthy. Friday was one of those times.In a thoughtful article, BuzzFeed discusses how analysis of social media and Internet search habits has proven so useful in identifying public health outbreaks and other trends.Google Flu Trends is well-known already, though it’s clearly far from perfect, as MedCity News has reported. Newer entrants build upon this, going beyond search to mine social media.For example, mobile app Sickweather issues geographically targeted alerts about clusters of infectious diseases, based on tweets and other indicators on social media. BuzzFeed said that Sickweather publicly noted the start of flu season before the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention did and “beat Chicago media” in reporting on an outbreak of whooping cough.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Why Samsung Is Partnering Up With Medtronic

Why Samsung Is Partnering Up With Medtronic | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Consumer electronics juggernaut Samsung Electronics Co. (NASDAQ Other:SSNLF) and medical device powerhouse Medtronic PLC (NYSE:MDT) have been in the news recently after they announced a joint partnership at the American Diabetes Association 75th Scientific Sessions. The goal of the partnership is to combine each of their areas of expertise to make it easier for people with diabetes to successfully manage their disease. The companies have stated their intentions to develop a range of future solutions that will allow for patients with diabetes to have easier access to viewing their data, with the ultimate goal of fully integrating mobile and wearable devices into a complete diabetes management system.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Conductive ink ushers in the next generation of wearable technology

Conductive ink ushers in the next generation of wearable technology | Digital Health | Scoop.it
In the tech industry, we throw around the term “revolutionary” relatively often to describe new developments in the industry. But every once in awhile, something comes along to truly deserve the title. Researchers from the University of Tokyo have developed a new conductive ink that would allow electronics to be printed on stretchable fabrics, which means that one day, printing a conductive shirt might be as easy as screen printing a design. While the wearables universe is admittedly already one of the most advanced in the industry, with new gadgets and gizmos released nearly every day, this latest development could actually change the face of the industry, streamlining the process of creating technologically advanced clothing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

DIGITAL HEALTH & CARE: Europe seeks the code for digital health

DIGITAL HEALTH & CARE: Europe seeks  the code for digital health | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The linkage between informationSince computer technology can nowadays find you the best restaurant or the quickest route home, keep you in touch with friends around the globe, and help you in a job search, it seems common logic that it should become a routine part of the health care scene, too.Though only up to a point, as it turns out. The logic is impeccable. The logistics are less evident.At its simplest, if your app directs you to a bad restaurant, or chooses the wrong route, the worst outcome may be no more than mild indigestion or a few minutes delay. But it’s not the same with a metering app that is supposed to warn a diabetic of dangerous glucose levels or advise remedial action for someone with a heart condition. If digital technology slips up on measuring a vital sign or transmitting critical symptoms, the consequences may be grave — in every sense of the word. and computer technologies inspired new hopes — and fears.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Google partners with Harvard and MIT researchers to delve into genomics research

Google partners with Harvard and MIT researchers to delve into genomics research | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Google could one day cure cancer. That is, Google and the brilliant minds at Harvard and MIT in a partnership with the Broad Institute, a biomedical and genomic research center based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Between Google’s enormous database of DNA analytics and the powerful research capabilities housed in the Broad Institute, the possibilities for medical breakthroughs are potentially endless.

In a blog post released Wednesday, Google noted, “In order to scale up by the next order of magnitude, Broad and Google will work together to explore how to build new tools and find new insights to propel biomedical research, using deep bioinformatics expertise, powerful analytics, and massive computing infrastructure. Collaboration between the world’s premier genomics and biomedical research center and the most advanced computing infrastructure can help develop a new generation of tools and services that will enable scientists — from large academic institutions, commercial organizations, or small research labs in remote corners of the world — to uncover a wealth of biological insight.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

D-Lab and Tata Center team wins $100K Vodafone award for mobile stethoscope

D-Lab and Tata Center team wins $100K Vodafone award for mobile stethoscope | Digital Health | Scoop.it
MIT research scientist Rich Fletcher and graduate student Dan Chamberlain, in collaboration with the Chest Research Foundation (CRF) in India, have won the $100,000 third prize in Vodafone’s annual Wireless Innovation Project awards program. Three awards are given annually to the top wireless innovations applied to social benefit around the world.


Fletcher’s team, based at MIT D-Lab and at the Tata Center for Technology and Design, received the award for developing a low-cost mobile platform for diagnosing pulmonary disease. Approximately one-fifth of the world’s population suffers from some form of pulmonary disease, which includes asthma, pneumonia, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung cancer. Pulmonary diseases such as COPD are responsible for over 14 percent of deaths worldwide.

more...
malek's comment, June 25, 9:20 AM
a leap jump in daignosis of heart and lung disease
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

High hopes for mobile health

High hopes for mobile health | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Buoyed by new technology that reduces manufacturing costs and improves output, the mobile health industry is enjoying some sustained growth right now. Whether it's a smartphone equipped with more accurate sensors or a wearable that gives clinicians the healthcare data they need to improve the wearer's life, consumers and providers alike are starting to see the value in mHealth tools and platforms.The New Jersey Institute of Technology's Online Master of Science in Computer Science program has created this infographic to illustrate what the market looks like now:

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Google jumps into medicine with wearable health tracker

Google jumps into medicine with wearable health tracker | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The same company that gave us Google Glass is now working on another kind of wearable: a health trackerGoogle has developed a wristwatch-like device that can track your pulse, activity level, heart rate and skin temperature. The big difference between this new device and the company's Android Wear platform is that the new tracker is intended for medical use. The idea is to track the wearer's health data, such as heart rate, continuously.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Behavioural Economics And Its Application In Digital & mHealth

Behavioural Economics And Its Application In Digital & mHealth | Digital Health | Scoop.it
In an ideal world our decisions would be the result of a careful weighing of positive and negatives and informed by our accumulated existing knowledge. We would always make optimal decisions. This is termed Rational Choice and became fashionable in the 1970’s with economists such as Gary S. Becker outlining ideas known as the pillars of ‘rational choice’ theory. 

Many digital health interventions rely on this ‘rational choice’ model, assuming people will make the right decisions regarding their health if given the right information and opportunity to do so, unfortunately it has been shown time and again that this is not the case.

If digital interventions, such as mobile health, are going to significantly improve outcomes for patients I feel we need to apply behavioural science in a more sophisticated way to our design process. I have been studying how behavioural economics could be applied to the design of digital healthcare solutions
more...
Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, June 24, 1:29 AM

Improving people’s health and supporting improved clinical outcomes for patients is predominantly about behavioural change. Certainly digital health interventions are predicated on the idea that we can modify behaviour, whether this is adherence to medication or changes in lifestyle. Unfortunately this is not easy to achieve, human beings are complex and when it comes to health this complexity is magnified.

...read the full article from Alex Butler

Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Novartis launches smartwatch navigation app for the visually impaired | mobihealthnews

Novartis launches smartwatch navigation app for the visually impaired | mobihealthnews | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Novartis has released a new Apple Watch and Android Wear app geared at helping visually-impaired people navigate their environment. The app is one of two Via Opta apps that have been available on the iPhone since August 2014, but a new upgrade adds additional features and brings Via Opta Nav onto a wearable for more convenient navigation.“Novartis is committed to providing innovative solutions which go beyond medicine, like these apps for the visually impaired which benefit their daily quality of life,” David Epstein, head of the pharma division at Novartis Pharmaceuticals, said in a statement. “We are proud to contribute and play a role in making these simple and convenient tools like the ViaOpta Daily and ViaOpta Nav apps available around the world.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Global health tracking technology market to reach $18.8B in 2019

Global health tracking technology market to reach $18.8B in 2019 | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The global market for self-monitoring health technologies reached $1.1 billion in 2013 and nearly $3.2 billion in 2014, according to a report from research firm BCC Research. This number will grow to $18.8 billion in 2019.BCC Research defines self-monitoring health technologies as offerings that allow consumers to monitor their own health. Devices in this category include wristbands, smartwatches, smartphone apps, and smartphones that act as a hub and collect data from health monitoring products as well as from their own embedded sensors. The hubs that BCC Research mentions could refer to offerings like Apple’s HealthKit platform and Google Fit.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

App guide targets best tools for behavioral healthcare treatment

App guide targets best tools for behavioral healthcare treatment | Digital Health | Scoop.it

A new app guide aims to help providers find and choose the best mobile health tool for behavioral healthcare treatment.The appImpact guide, created by the D.N. Batten Foundation and Centerstone Research Institute (CRI), provides insight and guidance on integrating health tech into the behavioral diagnosis and care giving processes."There are heaps of health-related apps available on the market. Some are great but others aren't," CRI CEO Tom Doub said in an announcement. "AppImpact helps providers cut through the clutter to use the best tool in the right program to effectively treat patients. These technologies are changing the behavioral healthcare landscape, and CRI's framework and best practices help providers stay on the leading edge of health solutions."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Goldman Sachs says a digital healthcare revolution is coming — and it could save America $300 billion

Goldman Sachs says a digital healthcare revolution is coming — and it could save America $300 billion | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The United States spends 18% of its GDP on healthcare each year.Though this percentage far exceeds that of other developed economies, government projections say it will only continue to rise in the coming years.It is often said that the US desperately needs to reduce healthcare costs — and analysts at Goldman Sachs think a major spending reduction is not far off, thanks to the Internet of Things (IoT).In a report published Monday, Goldman analysts predicted that digital healthcare will revolutionize the industry, both by increasing access to diagnostic, treatment, and preventative care, and by dramatically reducing costs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

88% of Nurses Use Mobile Health Apps for professional Purposes

88% of Nurses Use Mobile Health Apps for professional Purposes | Digital Health | Scoop.it
From smartphones, tablets, and mobile health apps to telemedicine and remote monitoring tools, the advancement of healthcare technologies has stimulated the entire industry to improve population health outcomes and the quality of patient care. The smartphone, in particular, is making headway in the healthcare industry with the majority of nurses owning and utilizing the device in a medical setting.A survey released by market intelligence firm InCrowd shows that 95 percent of nurses own a smartphone while 88 percent use the gadget including mobile health apps at their workplace.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

ResearchKit becomes a population health tool

ResearchKit becomes a population health tool | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Apple's ResearchKit app will be put to the test in a landmark population health study aimed at identifying and treating health issues facing the LGBT community. Researchers at the University of California at San Francisco recently announced that they would use the clinical research platform to collect data on health issues faced by gays, lesbians and transgenders, including HIV/AIDS, cancer, obesity, substance abuse and behavioral health problems like depression.The Population Research in Identity and Disparities for Equality (PRIDE) Study is the latest in a series of clinical studies launched in the wake of ResearchKit's rollout earlier this year. Others focus on breast cancer, asthma, Parkinson's disease, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Officials say this is the first ResearchKit study to focus on a population, rather than a specific health issue.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

10 more tech innovations changing medicine

10 more tech innovations changing medicine | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Enormous technological changes in medicine and healthcare are heading our way. If they hit us unprepared (which we are now), they will wash away the medical system we know, leaving a purely technology–based service without personal interaction. By preparing and planning, we have the opportunity to consciously and purposefully redesign the healthcare sector piece-by-piece. That’s the belief of medical futurist Dr. Bertalan Meskó, author of The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Technology and the Human Touch.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

With iPhone & Apple Watch, Apple playing a key role in 'consumerization' of healthcare

With iPhone & Apple Watch, Apple playing a key role in 'consumerization' of healthcare | Digital Health | Scoop.it
With the iPhone an everyday part of millions of consumers' lives, and now the debut of the Apple Watch, healthcare professionals believe that Apple is a pivotal part in what they see as the "consumerization" of healthcare, driven by easy access to health-related data.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Your next Apple Watch could save you from carpal tunnel syndrome

Your next Apple Watch could save you from carpal tunnel syndrome | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Apple has been working on the Apple Watch’s heart-rate monitor ever since the wearable launched in April. First, it was taking your pulse every 10 minutes. Then, it was doing it every 10 minutes unless you were moving around because the company said that a resting heart rate is a better health indicator than a “doing whatever” heart rate.

And that’s correct, but a newly released patent hints at some future improvements for the function that could also spare you some wrist pain and warn you about stress.

The filing, courtesy of Patently Apple, details arrays on the underside of future, hypothetical Apple Watches containing 9 and 25 different input areas. Some of these measure “skin proximity and tilt effect,” which is a fancy way of saying that it knows where it is both in relation to your wrist and the ground.

This extra data could improve readings on the heart monitor, sure, but it could also add a couple of other benefits. For example, this Apple Watch could keep track of how often and to what extent your wrist is bending and give you a heads-up if it thinks you might be headed to some repeated-motion injuries like tendonitis and carpal tunnel syndrome.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

MIT Hacking Medicine group forms nonprofit to tackle digital health efficacy

MIT Hacking Medicine group forms nonprofit to tackle digital health efficacy | Digital Health | Scoop.it
MIT’s Hacking Medicine program, which has organized medical hackathons since 2011, has launched a new spin-off: the Hacking Medicine Institute, a 501c3 nonprofit with a slightly different mission. The new organization will assess whether digital health products and services really work and, if they do, help them to prove their efficacy to consumers, doctors, and insurers.

“There’s so much hype now,” Zen Chu, MIT senior lecturer and faculty director of Hacking Medicine told the Wall Street Journal last week. “It’s great, in a way. It’s early stages, and there are so many startup companies. But they’re all having the same trouble. What’s actually working, and how do you prove that?”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

The FDA doesn’t want to regulate wearables, and device makers want to keep it that way

The Food and Drug Administration doesn't want to take away your Fitbit.That was the philosophy the FDA broadcast earlier this year when it unveiled its "draft guidance" for low-risk medical devices, a non-binding proposal that described the agency's thinking on regulation of devices like wearable fitness trackers. The guidance effectively suggests the agency won't vigorously regulate devices as long as they're not harmful and generally encourage healthy habits. Many devices with less-than-stellar track records for accuracy — such as calorie counters — would likely not be covered under the guidance. "Basically [we are] being transparent in where the FDA is focusing their enforcement efforts," says Bakul Patel, associate director for digital health at the FDA.
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, June 25, 1:27 PM

The FDA's draft guidance, "General Wellness: Policy for Low Risk Devices," describes which devices the agency believes it should focus on regulating. That includes "general wellness" products, which are described in two ways. First, the products that either have "an intended use that relates to maintaining or encouraging a general state of health or a healthy activity," such as a device that helps "log, track, or trend exercise activity." The devices may also have "an intended use claim that associates the role of healthy lifestyle with helping to reduce the risk or impact of certain chronic diseases or conditions" when the science clearly shows a healthy lifestyle can have an impact. (The FDA already considers something a "medical device" if it's used to diagnose or treat a disease.) "Low risk" products, according to the guidance, are non-invasive and generally do not "pose a risk to a user’s safety if device controls are not applied." 

Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Survey: Few Providers Discuss Wearables, Mobile Apps With Patients

Survey: Few Providers Discuss Wearables, Mobile Apps With Patients | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Few health care providers are discussing wearable devices or mobile health applications with their patients, even though they believe the technology could be beneficial, according a MedPanel market survey of 415 providers, Health IT Analytics reports (Bresnick, Health IT Analytics, 6/22).


Survey Findings


Researchers found that just 15% of providers report discussing wearable devices and mobile health apps with patients. However, providers participating in accountable care organizations were more than twice as likely to discuss such technology with their patients.
In addition, the survey found that providers believe some patients who are not using wearable devices or mobile health apps could benefit from the technology, Health Data Management reports (Slabodkin, Health Data Management, 6/22). Specifically, provider respondents said:


38% of patients who are not using a wearable device could benefit from such technology; and


42% of patients who are not using a mobile health app could benefit from such technology (Health IT Analytics, 6/22).


Further, the factors that providers listed as most important to mobile health were:Clinical utility of the data the devices produce; and
Ease of use.

more...
Paul Epping's curator insight, June 24, 1:27 AM

So amazing that "we" always seem to forget to include the end users when we develop new techthings for our health......

Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Cleveland Clinic goes virtual with mHealth consultation pilot

Cleveland Clinic goes virtual with mHealth consultation pilot | Digital Health | Scoop.it

The Cleveland Clinic is deploying a telemedicine service tapping mobile devices to provide patients a virtual consultation within minutes.The MyCare Online offering by Cleveland Clinic costs $49 per care interaction and requires either a smartphone, iPad or PC and a free app, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer. The service, which connects patients with a physician or nurse, is focused on helping users dealing with minor health issues such as rashes, the cold or the flu.Such mHealth services increasingly are being embraced by providers for a slew of reasons, from cost savings to improved care quality. For instance, as FierceMobileHealthcare has reported, UnitedHealthcare is partnering with Doctor On Demand, American Well and Optum to expand virtual healthcare services to a network of care physicians that will be accessible 24/7 via mobile devices atablets.

more...
No comment yet.