Digital Health
157.2K views | +44 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Alex Butler
onto Digital Health
Scoop.it!

This company tracks your kids online — and tells you about their mental health

This company tracks your kids online — and tells you about their mental health | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Prevention is the new focal point of modern health care. But while doctors worldwide are doing a better job of stopping diseases like HIV/AIDS before they take root in our bodies, they’ve been slower to bring such care to mental health.

 

Mevoked aims to change that.

Alex Butler's insight:

Another interesting example of behavioural tracking in mental health. With the work underway in schizophrenia and recovery from brain injury this is an area ripe with innovation. You can imagine the sensationalist headlines if you wanted to mis-represent stories such as this though...

more...
No comment yet.
Digital Health
The intersection between health and digital technology will herald a revolution for patients, healthcare professionals and pharmaceutical companies
Curated by Alex Butler
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

"The Healthcare revolution will not be televised"

My Presentation from Athens looking at 5 things digital can do to revolutionise pharmaceuticals (with a bit of Gil Scott Heron thrown in for good measure)

more...
Sophie Undreiner's curator insight, March 15, 2014 5:23 AM

@TedMed par Alex Butler

Vigisys's curator insight, November 2, 2014 5:10 AM

Une intéressante présentation (en anglais) qui aborde les principaux concepts qui seront fondateurs de l'e-santé à venir. Une belle inspiration pour le développement des futurs réseaux de santé numériques.

Harry Edwards's comment, June 8, 2015 1:57 AM
Buy medical equipment products online , guaranteed lowest prices at online medical equipment store. We supply medical products in wholesale price across USA
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Will artificial intelligence help to crack biology? | The Economist

Will artificial intelligence help to crack biology? | The Economist | Digital Health | Scoop.it

IN A former leatherworks just off Euston Road in London, a hopeful firm is starting up. BenevolentAI’s main room is large and open-plan. In it, scientists and coders sit busily on benches, plying their various trades. The firm’s star, though, has a private, temperature-controlled office. That star is a powerful computer that runs the software which sits at the heart of BenevolentAI’s business.

 

This software is an artificial-intelligence system.

AI, as it is known for short, comes in several guises. But BenevolentAI’s version of it is a form of machine learning that can draw inferences about what it has learned. In particular, it can process natural language and formulate new ideas from what it reads. Its job is to sift through vast chemical libraries, medical databases and conventionally presented scientific papers, looking for potential drug molecules.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

What the FDA did in digital health in 2016

What the FDA did in digital health in 2016 | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Over and above clearing a number of devices, the FDA had a busy year in 2016, passing a number of draft and final guidances related to digital health, having some notable conversations with vendors, and even turning down some devices whose FDA clearance was expected this year. We've rounded up the year's 510(k)'s in a separate article, but here's a rundown on some of the other actions the regulatory body took, as well as a brief look ahead at what 2017 might have in store for the FDA.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

As Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE approaches final stages, it offers glimpse of digital health journey

As Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE approaches final stages, it offers glimpse of digital health journey | Digital Health | Scoop.it
It’s come to this. More than four years after Qualcomm Foundation launched its $10 million Tricorder XPRIZE competition challenging companies to develop a 21st century version of a Star Trek medical device, the field of finalists has been whittled down to just two contenders. Final Frontier Medical Devices, based in the Philadelphia suburban town of Paoli, and Dynamical Biomarkers is based in Boston.Now these teams are entering the realm of live testing on consumers. The criteria for the contest means each team’s device has to measure five vital signs and test for 10 core conditions, including: anemia, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, leukocytosis, pneumonia, otitis media, sleep apnea, and urinary tract infection. Additionally, the devices are required to detect three elective health conditions from a set including strep throat, an HIV screen, hypertension, melanoma and shingles. They have to provide a diagnosis within minutes, according to the announcement.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

The future of emotion sensing wearables

Humans are about 72% accurate at reading emotions from facial expressions, computer vision is already up to 82%. That's just the start. What's coming next are wearables that read exactly what is going on in your emotional health, not just physical, and align it with what's happening in your life.We've already explored some of the biofeedback tech looking to minimise stress along with the now and next of tracking health and happiness. One new way we can think about what's in store for emotion sensing is to break it down into input (tracking), analysis and algorithms, and output in the form of apps and exercises.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Health Tech 2016: A Year To Recalibrate

Health Tech 2016: A Year To Recalibrate | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Among the key health technology lessons that 2016 has reinforced: biology is fiendishly complex; data ≠ insight; impacting health – whether making new drugs or meaningfully changing behavior – is hard; and palpable progress, experienced by patients, is starting to occur (and is tremendously exciting).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Living with diabetes? Fitbit and Medtronic can help

Living with diabetes? Fitbit and Medtronic can help | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Soon, your Fitbit won’t just be monitoring how many steps you take in a day — it will also keep tabs on your glucose levels. On Tuesday, Medtronic and Fitbit announced a new partnership that seeks to “integrate health and activity tracking for patients living with diabetes and their physicians and care teams.” For the first time, Fitbit users will be able to take advantage of Medtronic’s medical technology and gain valuable insights into how their exercise regimens impact glucose levels, hopefully leading to better management of the condition. And of course, it’s manifesting itself as an app — myLog.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Can this app help tackle the burden of diabetes?

Can this app help tackle the burden of diabetes? | Digital Health | Scoop.it
A new app combines data, artificial intelligence technology, human interaction and psychology to beat diabetes.Glyco Leap is the flagship product of Singapore-based digital health startup Holmusk. The digital program combines different health tools such as a fitness tracker and glucometer, interactive coaching from certified dietitians and a mobile application to help people manage or reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.The app is yet another example of growing innovations in health care that makes use of mobile technology. Organizations, including big and small firms, are increasingly looking at the different ways they can use mobile tech as more people rely on their phones for daily needs such as shopping, booking a cab or fitness tracking.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

BioBeats Uses AI and Machine Learning to Combat Stress Epidemic

BioBeats, the leader in digital health and artificial intelligence, today announces that it has created a new proprietary algorithm that effectively estimates user stress level from physiological signals. BioBeats Hear and Now platform uses machine learning and AI to provide highly personalized stress monitoring and management tools for individuals as well as corporate wellness programs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Anti-smoking app Quittr hopes to make quitting fun, help smokers pass craving hurdle

Anti-smoking app Quittr hopes to make quitting fun, help smokers pass craving hurdle | Digital Health | Scoop.it
"Exciting, interesting and fun" are probably not the first words that come to mind when you are considering quitting smoking.But Tasmanian researchers are working on a way to make weeks of nicotine withdrawal just that.A Heart Foundation grant of just more than $50,000 will allow Ivan Bindoff, a senior research fellow at UTAS, to test the viability of an app he has developed called Quittr.The app rewards quitters with virtual currency to redeem in a game."It's based on the premise that we know mobile health apps help people quit smoking, but we also know most people don't stick at it," he said."They don't engage in the app for more than a few days.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

In five years, machine learning will be a part of every doctor’s job, Vic Gundotra says

In five years, machine learning will be a part of every doctor’s job, Vic Gundotra says | Digital Health | Scoop.it

When Vic Gundotra left Google in 2014, he thought he might retire, forever. But a lingering interest in wearable technology and machine learning led him to AliveCor, which lets users monitor their heart health from their smartphones.

 

Diving back into the fray of tech, Gundotra is now convinced that the potential of wearables and machine learning is just starting to be unlocked. AliveCor’s portable EKG sensor, Kardia, alerts users if their heartbeats are irregular — and now, the Mayo Clinic, an AliveCor investor, has begun identifying other signals in an EKG reading that a human might miss.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

A new brain health app from Neurotrack warns users of memory decline

A new brain health app from Neurotrack warns users of memory decline | Digital Health | Scoop.it
A Redwood City, Calif. startup called Neurotrack Technologies Inc. has created a brain health app that is helping scientists unravel the mysteries of memory, and work to find a cure for Alzheimer’s.Its simple browser-based app screens users for signs of cognitive decline based on their eye movement as they watch a few images presented on their screens. These tests used to take about 30 minutes, and were available only at the doctor’s office using hugely expensive equipment.Neurotrack has been able to shrink their scans down to a 5-minute, home-based process thanks to technological advances around eye tracking technology, data analytics, machine learning and computer vision, according to the company’s CEO and cofounder Elli Kaplan.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Beddit 3 knows if you’ve been sleeping. It knows if you’re awake.

Beddit 3 knows if you’ve been sleeping. It knows if you’re awake. | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Jolted into existence with a $500,000 Indiegogo campaign back in 2013, followed by a version 2 that was sold in Apple Stores all over the world, Beddit is back with a third generation of its popular addition to the Quantified Self movement: sleep tracking. The product went on sale in September and immediately sold out, and the company is still selling Beddit 3 faster than it can make them.“I used to be an elite triathlete,” Lasse Leppäkorpi, founder and CEO of Beddit tells me, when I ask him how he ended up dedicating his life to sleep. “I was trying to qualify for the first-ever triathlon at the Sydney Olympics in 2000, but I tried too hard. I was diagnosed with overtraining syndrome, and started a long recovery process.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Robot pal will keep older people active by pushing their buttons

Robot pal will keep older people active by pushing their buttons | Digital Health | Scoop.it
A designer robot that nags you to take your pills, go for a walk or phone your children could be your companion in old age.The Elli.Q resembles a small speaker with an attached tablet computer. It was created by the Swiss designer Yves Béhar and Intuitive Robotics, an Israeli company, and is being displayed at the New Old exhibition at the Design Museum.It can do similar things to the Amazon Echo smart speaker, such as switching on music or TV programmes, making Skype calls or turning up the heating in response to voice commands. However, unlike Echo, which waits for your orders, Elli.Q suggests activities based on your previous behaviour and recommendations by family members.
more...
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

UK's NHS trials AI app as alternative to medical helpline

UK's NHS trials AI app as alternative to medical helpline | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The UK National Health Service is to trial an artificially intelligent (AI) medical application in place of its NHS 111 non-emergency helpline.The app comes from Babylon Health, a UK start-up specializing in remote healthcare applications. It enables users to type their symptoms into a chat box – much like texting – and the app will perform triage for urgent but non-life-threatening conditions.The trial is set to start at the end of January, meaning that for the next six months more than 1.2m people in north central London will be able to access the app, according to the FT.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Got a chronic disease? There will soon be a prescription app for that

The era of "Quantified Self" (a term coined in 2007 by US WIRED founding executive editor Kevin Kelly) is relatively new. The first Fitbit digital step counters launched in late 2009 and we've since seen an explosion of various wearables, apps and digital health devices all riding the exponential wave of smaller and cheaper mobile-connected and app-ified sensors and computing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Can wearable technology can help healthcare for the elderly?

Can wearable technology can help healthcare for the elderly? | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Recent studies indicate that by 2030 the United States population will be comprised of around 74 million elderly individuals1. Such a percentage is reason to look at new senior health solutions that can provide proper, swift and affordable care.Adults are living longer lives now, and they are experiencing new health, economic and living struggles. With many of the elderly experiencing health problems that include poor mobility, vision loss, hearing loss, communication barriers and memory loss, wearable technology can be helpful.
more...
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Digital health investors see more money pouring into big data

Digital health investors see more money pouring into big data | Digital Health | Scoop.it
It was a session short on talk of actual dollars, but investor money will keep flowing into digital healthcare—under certain conditions.That’s the group consensus of four Wall Street bankers and a venture capital executive that spoke this morning in New York at the 2016 Digital Health Conference sponsored by the New York eHealth Collaborative.For next year healthcare investors—especially digital healthcare investors—will continue to look for start-up and growing technology companies that are developing consumer applications that solve problems, help to better structure predictive health information and better manage risk.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Five User Types Are Key to Boosting Mobile Adoption in Healthcare

Five User Types Are Key to Boosting Mobile Adoption in Healthcare | Digital Health | Scoop.it
We currently see highly varied uses of mobile solutions in healthcare, from clinical applications to managed health, and perhaps even more diversity in the users themselves and how they engage with mobile healthcare. Too often, these users are treated as monoliths that either do or do not use mobile health solutions. But in order to see true gains in mobile adoption, more precise segmentation and understanding of these users is essential.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

How Can Wearable Technology Improve Cancer Treatment?

How Can Wearable Technology Improve Cancer Treatment? | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Current cancer treatment is based on episodic encounters. Even during chemotherapy, patients generally see their physician for maybe eight to ten minutes every three weeks, said Peter Kuhn, ATOM-HP’s co-lead researcher and a professor of medicine, biomedical engineering, and aerospace and mechanical engineering at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.“The more than 30,000 minutes between visits are a missed opportunity,” Kuhn said. “Technology can be leveraged to fill this gap and provide a comprehensive picture. The collected data can lead to better treatment decisions, better survival rates, and better understanding between physician and patient.”
more...
Pharma Guy's curator insight, December 8, 2016 7:54 AM

Maybe not. Read "The mHealth App Gap"; http://sco.lt/8einD7 

Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Dr. Robert Wachter on The Digitalhealth Transformation: "We Haven't Seen Anything Yet"

Dr. Robert Wachter on The Digitalhealth Transformation: "We Haven't Seen Anything Yet" | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Wachter, professor and chair of the department of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, author of "The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine's Computer Age," and notable expert in health IT circles, told a packed audience at the New World Stages venue in New York City's theater district that the two major trends currently occurring in healthcare are the pressure to deliver high quality care at a low cost while also becoming digitized. "What's odd isn't that we're being pressurized to deliver high value care at low costs, but [rather] that this is new," said Wachter. "This is a mega trend and is independent of which administration is in the White House. This is a bipartisan issue."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Are wearables on the decline or poised for a comeback?

Are wearables on the decline or poised for a comeback? | Digital Health | Scoop.it
It's been a rough couple of weeks for wearables. Yesterday, Lenovo announced it was abandoning its Moto Androidwear line indefinitely, with head of global product development Shakil Barkat saying "wearables do not have broad enough appeal for us to continue to build on it year after year,” according to The Verge. Last week it came out that Pebble, which arguably invented the smartwatch space, is being bought by Fitbit for a price that reportedly won't cover its debts. And Angel, which was to be the open source wearable that allowed anyone to adapt the technology to their needs, also shut down recently (MobiHealthNews broke the news last week).If that's not enough for you, go back a little further and you'll see Intel laying off its wearables group and killing the Basis line and Microsoft essentially killing the Microsoft Band back in October. And that's without even mentioning Jawbone, which has been in a sort of slow motion decline for months if not years without a new product in sight. This is surely not a complete list.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Digital Health Tech Takes Off in Clinical Trials and Pharmaceuticals

Digital Health Tech Takes Off in Clinical Trials and Pharmaceuticals | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Digital health tech is moving beyond the consumer market. Research from Frost & Sullivan shows that the healthcare wearables device market could more than triple to $18.9 billion in 2020 from $5.1 billion in 2015. The healthcare and pharmaceutical industries are fully embracing wearables to monitor patients between visits, improve patient adherence to medications and accelerate clinical drug trials.Wearables can give healthcare professionals insights into patient behavior and disease progression through a steady flow of electronic data transmitted by the devices. Medical wearables also enable clinicians and pharmaceutical companies conducting drug trials to collect more patient-generated health data to guide treatment for individual patients and contribute to ongoing population health analytics research initiatives.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

App could improve reproductive health in developing countries

App could improve reproductive health in developing countries | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Guelph’s Erin MacIndoe Sproule and her team won an award at the recent Break Inequality Hackathon competition at the Google headquarters in Kitchener. The aim of the event, organized by Developers without Borders, was to find innovative ways to use digital/mobile technology to address social or health problems in the developing world. The MacIndoe Sproule team won the Innovation Award at the event, and a $500 prize, for their Red Tracker, a cellphone app that could help women in a developing country better understand their fertility.The simple app allows women to keep track of their menstrual cycle and ovulation, and sent that information to a health care provider, so that community health workers can better serve communities, specifically in Bangladesh.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Parkinson's app goes global

Parkinson's app goes global | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Parkinson's is a neurological disorder that affects as many as 10 million people around the world. It is a condition that results from a shortage of dopamine in the brain, a chemical that helps instructions cross from one nerve cell to the next, thereby enabling a person's ability to control their movement. While its severity can vary from person to person, its symptoms can now be generally well controlled with medication. In addition to these drugs, there are now also new non-intrusive approaches that are helping those with the condition to lead more independent and fulfilling lives.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

As users move to mobile, Google says they made 200 million queries for info about cancer drugs

As users move to mobile, Google says they made 200 million queries for info about cancer drugs | Digital Health | Scoop.it
As mobile phones begin to be used as a primary source of media consumption, it will become increasingly important for marketers to capture the attention of users during those brief interactions, or “micro-moments,” a Google Health executive said.One in 20 online searches are healthcare-related, which means there is an opportunity for pharmaceutical and healthcare companies to leverage digital platforms to reach their target audiences, said David Silk, senior partner lead at Google Health, at the HITLAB Innovators Summit in New York on Thursday.What's critical for drugmakers and healthcare companies is to be present in those micro-moments, when people look up information as they stand in line and go about their daily lives. “I may not make a decision about what hotel I'm booking now, but if you're in that initial research or micro-moment, you're not in my decision-making process,” said Silk.
more...
No comment yet.