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IBM Will Soon Let Developers Run Apps On Watson, Its Smart-As-A-Human Computer

IBM Will Soon Let Developers Run Apps On Watson, Its Smart-As-A-Human Computer | Digital Health | Scoop.it

IBM will open up Watson to app developers in 2014, the company announced on Thursday.

Watson is a supercomputer that thinks and speaks like a human. It's the computer that won Jeopardy in 2011.

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The intersection between health and digital technology will herald a revolution for patients, healthcare professionals and pharmaceutical companies
Curated by Alex Butler
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"The Healthcare revolution will not be televised"

My Presentation from Athens looking at 5 things digital can do to revolutionise pharmaceuticals (with a bit of Gil Scott Heron thrown in for good measure)

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@TedMed par Alex Butler

Vigisys's curator insight, November 2, 2014 5:10 AM

Une intéressante présentation (en anglais) qui aborde les principaux concepts qui seront fondateurs de l'e-santé à venir. Une belle inspiration pour le développement des futurs réseaux de santé numériques.

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Internet Of Things To Change The Face Of US Healthcare

Internet Of Things To Change The Face Of US Healthcare | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is already revolutionizing our lives. Endowing "things" with better-than-human eyes and ears (sensors) and the ability communicate is leading to improvements in our personal lives and business productivity in countless ways.The IoT is, however, still a nascent paradigm, and has just begun to penetrate into some sectors such as healthcare. The IoT promises a veritable plethora of time and money-saving innovations for healthcare, including remote patient monitoring, telehealth and behavioral modification platforms that will dramatically improve chronic disease management and reduce costs.
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NYC’s Mount Sinai has multi-layered approach to health apps

NYC’s Mount Sinai has multi-layered approach to health apps | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Mount Sinai Health System in New York City is in the process of recruiting 300 patients with inflammatory bowel disease for a randomized clinical trial of HealthPromise, a homegrown app that collects patient-reported data in the context of disease status and aggregates this information with patient records.

This aggregation helps create a “unified report card” for clinicians to reference, according to Dr. Ashish Atreja, chief technology innovation and engagement officer in Mount Sinai’s Department of Medicine. “They can have more proactive disease management,” explained Atreja, who directs Sinai AppLab, a group that launched three years ago to conduct research on healthcare apps of all kinds and commercialize the best ideas developed within Mount Sinai.
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Google's New Wearable to Take Health Tracking to the Next Level

Google's New Wearable to Take Health Tracking to the Next Level | Digital Health | Scoop.it
In a bid to relish a better standard of living, working day in and day out has become a norm. This has left people with less time to focus on their personal lives. And as a result their health is being neglected. Imagine if I told you that now you have someone who will keep an eye on our health while you keep on with your daily work!? Yes! It’s true. Smarty-pants Google’s latest health tracker has made this possible.

So what is this health tracker all about?


Before you come up with general questions like how big it is, how I can use it, or is it mobile or not? Here’s the answer to all your queries – the Google Health Tracker is a wearable. Yes, you heard it right! Just like a smartwatch, it has a wrist band which you can wear around your hand and take wherever you go. It keeps track of heart rate, skin temperature, and heart rhythm, along with environmental conditions like light exposure and noise levels. It can also monitor your blood pressure.

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Wearables Are Our Foray Into Empowering A Healthier Population

Wearables Are Our Foray Into Empowering A Healthier Population | Digital Health | Scoop.it
In 1937, Sylvan Goldman, the owner of the Humpty-Dumpty grocery store chain, invented the shopping cart.  Determined to reduce the cost of having to staff his stores with enough clerks to personally help each customer with over-the-counter purchases, he changed the paradigm.  He created displays and shelves where people could help themselves, and, to prevent any inconvenience, he invented the shopping cart so they didn’t have to struggle with armfuls of goods. For all intent and purpose, the creation of the shopping cart was the byproduct of a much larger cost-saving initiative.  

In many ways, healthcare is undergoing a similar change.  Faced with high and unsustainable costs, the industry needs to change and eventually to move toward a self-service model where patients are more actively involved in their own care. We have already begun to see this in the rise of urgent care facilities, which are reducing the volume of more costly Emergency Room visits; and this movement will continue as patients only see their physician when they are very ill or if they require specialized care.  While this will decrease volumes and help reduce overall healthcare costs, to maintain a healthy population people need to be able to accurately monitor their health in between visits with sufficient insight to know they are well.  Wearables are that first step of this evolution in healthcare.
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What Aetna’s $37B acquisition of Humana could mean for digital health

What Aetna’s $37B acquisition of Humana could mean for digital health | Digital Health | Scoop.it
iTriage iOS appAfter weeks of rumors, this morning health insurance company Aetna announced that it is acquiring rival Humana for $36 billion in cash and stock. The news follows smaller health insurance company Centene’s $6.3 billion plan to acquire health insurance company Health Net, which would make that company the biggest private administrator of Medicaid programs in the US. Aetna’s absorption of Humana nets it 14 million customers across its commercial, Medicare and Medicaid programs.As has been expected for some time, this deal could set off a flurry of M&A activity among the health insurance companies in the US. Among many other important considerations, such consolidation brings with it fewer potential customers for those working to gain traction for their digital health offerings, which have long counted payers as an important customer.
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FDA expands Proteus Digital Health’s clearance to include measuring medication adherence

FDA expands Proteus Digital Health’s clearance to include measuring medication adherence | Digital Health | Scoop.it
ProteusProteus Digital Health has received an update to its FDA 510(k) clearance for its digital medicine platform, adding a new indication to the clearance. The system is now, to the company’s knowledge, the first technology to have an indication in its FDA clearance for measuring medication adherence.“We are delighted that our collaborative work with the FDA continues to enable positive progress,” Proteus cofounder and Chief Medical Officer Dr. George Savage said in a statement. “We believe that ingestible devices have the potential to speed clinical trials and improve the real-world effectiveness of medicines in community settings.”
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Quest Diagnostics, HealthTap Launch Virtual Diagnostic Testing for Healthcare Consumers

Quest Diagnostics, HealthTap Launch Virtual Diagnostic Testing for Healthcare Consumers | Digital Health | Scoop.it
HealthTap announced on Tuesday a new collaboration with Quest Diagnostics that will enable doctors to order diagnostic testing services for patients through HealthTap’s virtual care platform.


We’re told that this is the first ever partnership between a major national medical laboratory provider and an end-to-end virtual care company.
The end result? The effort will enable doctors and consumers to access a broad range of diagnostic service options to help care for patients in a virtual setting.


“Our mission is to help billions everywhere live healthier, happier lives,” a provided statement reads. “Today we pass a significant milestone in enabling the most comprehensive access to health-related information available, including lab testing, results, and doctor evaluations, right from the convenience of a mobile device or personal computer”


Through the collaboration, HealthTap’s network of doctors will be able to order laboratory testing for patients who seek virtual consults via HealthTap.

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Watson’s next feat? Taking on cancer

Watson’s next feat? Taking on cancer | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Story by Ariana Eunjung Cha Published on June 27, 2015HoustonCandida Vitale and the other fellows at MD Anderson’s leukemia treatment center had known one another for only a few months, but they already were very tight. The nine of them shared a small office and were always hanging out on weekends.But she wasn’t quite sure what to make of the new guy. Rumor had it that he had finished med school in two years and had a photographic memory of thousands of journal articles and relevant clinical trials. When the fellows were asked to summarize patients’ records for the senior faculty in the mornings, he always seemed to have the best answers.“I was surprised,” said Vitale, a 31-year-old who received her MD in Italy. “Even if you work all night, it would be impossible to be able to put this much information together like that.” brain is everybody everywhere. It “the I’vehad.”)
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Google health wristband is more than a "me too" wearable

Google health wristband is more than a "me too" wearable | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Google announced last week that they’ve developed a clinical grade health tracking wristband for use in medical research and clinical trials. In other words, the Google health wristband won’t show up on Amazon or in Walgreens. And that’s one of the most interesting things about it.

News of the device has been widely reported, generally with enthusiasm. Details on the device, developed out of the Google X group, are still scant however and it seems to be in relatively early phases of validation. According to Bloomberg, the device will measure heart rate, heart rhythm and skin temperature. It will also capture environmental information like light exposure and noise levels.
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Google has competition in crowdsourcing public health

Google has competition in crowdsourcing public health | Digital Health | Scoop.it
BuzzFeed, that ridiculously profitable bastion of clickbait and quizzes all your Facebook friends annoy you with actually has real journalists and an investigative division, and once in a while, along comes something that’s truly newsworthy. Friday was one of those times.In a thoughtful article, BuzzFeed discusses how analysis of social media and Internet search habits has proven so useful in identifying public health outbreaks and other trends.Google Flu Trends is well-known already, though it’s clearly far from perfect, as MedCity News has reported. Newer entrants build upon this, going beyond search to mine social media.For example, mobile app Sickweather issues geographically targeted alerts about clusters of infectious diseases, based on tweets and other indicators on social media. BuzzFeed said that Sickweather publicly noted the start of flu season before the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention did and “beat Chicago media” in reporting on an outbreak of whooping cough.
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Why Samsung Is Partnering Up With Medtronic

Why Samsung Is Partnering Up With Medtronic | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Consumer electronics juggernaut Samsung Electronics Co. (NASDAQ Other:SSNLF) and medical device powerhouse Medtronic PLC (NYSE:MDT) have been in the news recently after they announced a joint partnership at the American Diabetes Association 75th Scientific Sessions. The goal of the partnership is to combine each of their areas of expertise to make it easier for people with diabetes to successfully manage their disease. The companies have stated their intentions to develop a range of future solutions that will allow for patients with diabetes to have easier access to viewing their data, with the ultimate goal of fully integrating mobile and wearable devices into a complete diabetes management system.
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Conductive ink ushers in the next generation of wearable technology

Conductive ink ushers in the next generation of wearable technology | Digital Health | Scoop.it
In the tech industry, we throw around the term “revolutionary” relatively often to describe new developments in the industry. But every once in awhile, something comes along to truly deserve the title. Researchers from the University of Tokyo have developed a new conductive ink that would allow electronics to be printed on stretchable fabrics, which means that one day, printing a conductive shirt might be as easy as screen printing a design. While the wearables universe is admittedly already one of the most advanced in the industry, with new gadgets and gizmos released nearly every day, this latest development could actually change the face of the industry, streamlining the process of creating technologically advanced clothing.
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Privacy a priority during health system's Apple Watch deployment

Privacy a priority during health system's Apple Watch deployment | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Protecting patient data and privacy requires prime attention when deploying mHealth technology, according to Michael Ash, chief transformation officer at Nebraska Medicine. The health system is conducting a $10 million research project on the impact of remote health monitoring of chronically ill patients, and is now deploying an Apple Watch-based version of its Epic MyChart app to let patients and physicians communicate and access data from test result notices to appointment information.

In a recent interview with HealthcareInfoSecurity, Ash says that security strategies surrounding such mobile endeavors must encompass all potential risk points, from user access to data sharing.

In deploying the app, Nebraska made a series of decisions regarding security to ensure data is protected at every point, from creation to transmission to storage. No data resides on the Watch and encryption technology is used for transmitting data between the Epic system and the wearable.
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Michael Ash, Chief Transformation Officer at Nebraska Medicine, 

said that In deploying the app, they made a series of decisions regarding security to ensure data is protected at every point, from creation to transmission to storage. No data resides on the Watch and encryption technology is used for transmitting data between the Epic system and the wearable.  -  "We turned off Siri [Apple's digital voice assistant] capability for data transmission," Ash says, noting that user authentication also is a priority to ensure data security and privacy. "No permanent patient identifiable information is stored on the smartphone and that is the same for patient and physician apps.

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NHS taps mobile tools to boost physician access to patients

NHS taps mobile tools to boost physician access to patients | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The U.K.'s National Health Service is deploying Dr Now mHealth technology that offers patients video consults as well a telehealth prescription service that delivers needed medicine to patients' homes or other non-medical center locations.

The app, available for Apple and Android devices, is being used by NHS England to shorten the waiting time to see a physician and access to needed medication, according to a HIT Consultant report. The goal is to provide a healthcare service supply chain that helps keep costs down while boosting access to medical practitioners and meds.
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Personal Health In The Digital Age

Personal Health In The Digital Age | Digital Health | Scoop.it
We live in the digital age. You know that already. Two out of three Americans are now smartphone owners, and more than 86 percent of the population is connected online. But while digital has permeated everything from our social lives to how we work and how we shop, it is only starting to touch how we manage health.
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La santé personnelle a l'ère du digitale 

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iPhone’s Logo Could Soon House Health Sensors and Chargers

iPhone’s Logo Could Soon House Health Sensors and Chargers | Digital Health | Scoop.it

here are plenty of patents out there being filed by Apple, and from time to time we catch some really ingenious ones. Such is the case with a fresh one, called Concealed Electrical Connectors, discovered by the folks over at AppleInsider.

The patent application was first filed for in December 2013 and describes a clever process which would allow Apple to endow its iPhone logos with health sensors, fingerprint readers and even a inductive charging setup. According to the patent, Apple’s engineers have invented an electrical system which can be implemented within the iPhone’s chassis in order to provide housing for various sensors.


When you think of Apple and sensors, it’s the Apple Watch which comes to mind, but it seems that the company is at least pondering over the idea of embedding a plethora of sensors, monitors, readers and chargers into its iPhones and iPads, as well. What’s curious is that Apple could be using existing apertures or surface anomalies to achieve that. And it seems that that the Apple logo which is inscribed on all iPhone and iPad models is the most aesthetic way to achieve that.

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Will mHealth's rise signal the end of the EMR?

Will mHealth's rise signal the end of the EMR? | Digital Health | Scoop.it
At this point, the answer is no, and mHealth vendors and EMR providers understand this. As Navani points out, the data has to be curated first – collected, sifted and organized into something that a provider can trust and ultimately use. Some EMR companies tackle this issue by shunting consumer-entered data into a PHR or similar silo; the consumer then grants permission to the provider to parse over that data and determine what can be pulled out and ultimately entered into the medical record.

Jeff Margolis, CEO of Welltok – whose book, "The Healthcare Cure," includes a chapter appropriately titled "The Digital Alphabet Soup" – thinks both EMRs and EHRs are flawed because they're built around doctors, rather than consumers, and exist only to chart the intersections of the healthcare provider and patient. A true health record, he says, focuses on the consumer and accumulates all data that enables the consumer to be responsible for his or her health.

But where does the doctor fit in?

"Doctors have their hands full practicing sick care," Margolis says.

The proliferation of consumer-facing apps and devices has also given rise to a dichotomy in how mHealth data is collected. On one side stand platforms like Apple's HealthKit and ResearchKit, which gather consumer data for use by healthcare providers. On the other side are platforms like Qualcomm Life's 2net hub, which takes data from reliable devices – not the consumer – and goes to great lengths to ensure that such data is "medical grade."

Can both data streams share space in the same record? That depends on how EMRs and EHRs are defined.
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Digital health market continues to 'mature' in 2015

Digital health market continues to 'mature' in 2015 | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The digital health market continues to mature as we move into the second half of 2015, with Fitbit's IPO and a focus on personalized medicine leading the way, according to a mid-year report from StartUp Health.While digital health funding is not outpacing 2014, which was a record year for investments in the market, capital flow is remaining steady this year, the report says.
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Novartis launches smartwatch navigation app for the visually impaired | mobihealthnews

Novartis launches smartwatch navigation app for the visually impaired | mobihealthnews | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Novartis has released a new Apple Watch and Android Wear app geared at helping visually-impaired people navigate their environment. The app is one of two Via Opta apps that have been available on the iPhone since August 2014, but a new upgrade adds additional features and brings Via Opta Nav onto a wearable for more convenient navigation.“Novartis is committed to providing innovative solutions which go beyond medicine, like these apps for the visually impaired which benefit their daily quality of life,” David Epstein, head of the pharma division at Novartis Pharmaceuticals, said in a statement. “We are proud to contribute and play a role in making these simple and convenient tools like the ViaOpta Daily and ViaOpta Nav apps available around the world.”
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Global health tracking technology market to reach $18.8B in 2019

Global health tracking technology market to reach $18.8B in 2019 | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The global market for self-monitoring health technologies reached $1.1 billion in 2013 and nearly $3.2 billion in 2014, according to a report from research firm BCC Research. This number will grow to $18.8 billion in 2019.BCC Research defines self-monitoring health technologies as offerings that allow consumers to monitor their own health. Devices in this category include wristbands, smartwatches, smartphone apps, and smartphones that act as a hub and collect data from health monitoring products as well as from their own embedded sensors. The hubs that BCC Research mentions could refer to offerings like Apple’s HealthKit platform and Google Fit.
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App guide targets best tools for behavioral healthcare treatment

App guide targets best tools for behavioral healthcare treatment | Digital Health | Scoop.it

A new app guide aims to help providers find and choose the best mobile health tool for behavioral healthcare treatment.The appImpact guide, created by the D.N. Batten Foundation and Centerstone Research Institute (CRI), provides insight and guidance on integrating health tech into the behavioral diagnosis and care giving processes."There are heaps of health-related apps available on the market. Some are great but others aren't," CRI CEO Tom Doub said in an announcement. "AppImpact helps providers cut through the clutter to use the best tool in the right program to effectively treat patients. These technologies are changing the behavioral healthcare landscape, and CRI's framework and best practices help providers stay on the leading edge of health solutions."

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Goldman Sachs says a digital healthcare revolution is coming — and it could save America $300 billion

Goldman Sachs says a digital healthcare revolution is coming — and it could save America $300 billion | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The United States spends 18% of its GDP on healthcare each year.Though this percentage far exceeds that of other developed economies, government projections say it will only continue to rise in the coming years.It is often said that the US desperately needs to reduce healthcare costs — and analysts at Goldman Sachs think a major spending reduction is not far off, thanks to the Internet of Things (IoT).In a report published Monday, Goldman analysts predicted that digital healthcare will revolutionize the industry, both by increasing access to diagnostic, treatment, and preventative care, and by dramatically reducing costs.
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88% of Nurses Use Mobile Health Apps for professional Purposes

88% of Nurses Use Mobile Health Apps for professional Purposes | Digital Health | Scoop.it
From smartphones, tablets, and mobile health apps to telemedicine and remote monitoring tools, the advancement of healthcare technologies has stimulated the entire industry to improve population health outcomes and the quality of patient care. The smartphone, in particular, is making headway in the healthcare industry with the majority of nurses owning and utilizing the device in a medical setting.A survey released by market intelligence firm InCrowd shows that 95 percent of nurses own a smartphone while 88 percent use the gadget including mobile health apps at their workplace.
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ResearchKit becomes a population health tool

ResearchKit becomes a population health tool | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Apple's ResearchKit app will be put to the test in a landmark population health study aimed at identifying and treating health issues facing the LGBT community. Researchers at the University of California at San Francisco recently announced that they would use the clinical research platform to collect data on health issues faced by gays, lesbians and transgenders, including HIV/AIDS, cancer, obesity, substance abuse and behavioral health problems like depression.The Population Research in Identity and Disparities for Equality (PRIDE) Study is the latest in a series of clinical studies launched in the wake of ResearchKit's rollout earlier this year. Others focus on breast cancer, asthma, Parkinson's disease, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Officials say this is the first ResearchKit study to focus on a population, rather than a specific health issue.

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10 more tech innovations changing medicine

10 more tech innovations changing medicine | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Enormous technological changes in medicine and healthcare are heading our way. If they hit us unprepared (which we are now), they will wash away the medical system we know, leaving a purely technology–based service without personal interaction. By preparing and planning, we have the opportunity to consciously and purposefully redesign the healthcare sector piece-by-piece. That’s the belief of medical futurist Dr. Bertalan Meskó, author of The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Technology and the Human Touch.
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