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Join the largest mobile health community on Google+

Join the largest mobile health community on Google+ | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Alex Butler's insight:

Mobile Health is not just the delivery of healthcare services via mobile communication devices but a revolution in patient involvement in their own health and wellness. Combined with Big Data it forms the core of 21st Century digital health

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Sven Awege's curator insight, October 31, 2013 5:29 AM

It's fast become the elephant in the room.

Digital Health
The intersection between health and digital technology will herald a revolution for patients, healthcare professionals and pharmaceutical companies
Curated by Alex Butler
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"The Healthcare revolution will not be televised"

My Presentation from Athens looking at 5 things digital can do to revolutionise pharmaceuticals (with a bit of Gil Scott Heron thrown in for good measure)

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Sophie Undreiner's curator insight, March 15, 2014 5:23 AM

@TedMed par Alex Butler

Vigisys's curator insight, November 2, 2014 5:10 AM

Une intéressante présentation (en anglais) qui aborde les principaux concepts qui seront fondateurs de l'e-santé à venir. Une belle inspiration pour le développement des futurs réseaux de santé numériques.

Harry Edwards's comment, June 8, 2015 1:57 AM
Buy medical equipment products online , guaranteed lowest prices at online medical equipment store. We supply medical products in wholesale price across USA
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Parkinson's Digital Challenge Uses Mobile, Remote Data to Monitor Health

Parkinson's Digital Challenge Uses Mobile, Remote Data to Monitor Health | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The Parkinson’s Disease Digital Biomarker DREAM Challenge was just launched by Sage Bionetworks as the first of a series of open, crowd-funded projects designed to help researchers identify ways to use smartphones and remote sensing devices to monitor health and disease.The first DREAM Challenge will focus on using sensors to identify aspects of Parkinson’s disease (PD) severity. Results, which are expected this fall, should provide best practices and tools to advance the development of Parkinson’s digital biomarkers, as well as to advance the mobile health community.
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£86 million central funding pot for healthcare technology

£86 million central funding pot for healthcare technology | Digital Health | Scoop.it
A £86 million fund for investment in in innovative healthcare technology has been announced by the government, which will include the launch of a new Digital Health Catalyst.Unveiled last week, the multi-million pound fund will support small and medium sized enterprises to develop, test and integrate new technologies in the NHS.The money is provided jointly by Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Department of Health.There will be a £35 million digital health technology catalyst for innovators that will be used to match fund health technology.Ben Moody, head of health and social care at techUK, said in a statement that this catalyst will be “a great boost for innovators in the sector”.
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Asthma news: New FREE app that tells you when your next ATTACK will happen

Asthma news: New FREE app that tells you when your next ATTACK will happen | Digital Health | Scoop.it
ASTHMA attacks can occur at anytime, but a new smartphone app has been created telling you when it’s most likely to hit.
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NHS to start prescribing health apps that help manage conditions

NHS to start prescribing health apps that help manage conditions | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The future of healthcare could be in your pocket. Two new medical apps that help people monitor their health at home, reducing their need to visit a doctor, are set to be rolled out to as many as four UK National Health Service trusts over the next year.The apps, which are currently being trialled in four hospitals in Oxfordshire, UK, transmit patient data from a tablet or smartphone directly to clinicians. According to Ilan Lieberman, a member of the Royal Society of Medicine’s council on telemedicine and ehealth, such apps will have a huge impact on the management of chronic diseases.One system, called GDm-health, helps manage the treatment of gestational diabetes – a condition that affects about 1 in 10 pregnant women. The smartphone app lets women send each blood glucose reading they take at home to their diabetes clinician.
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Sorry, Silicon Valley, but ‘disruption’ isn’t a cure-all - The Boston Globe

Sorry, Silicon Valley, but ‘disruption’ isn’t a cure-all - The Boston Globe | Digital Health | Scoop.it
WHEN IT comes to addressing epidemics — and a lot of other global challenges — the Silicon Valley startup mentality doesn’t work.I study how infectious diseases spread. Late last year, a colleague and I found ourselves pitching our science to an organization that spends millions of tech-industry dollars to accelerate and disrupt the kind of research we do. Their representative was just out of college, and he carried himself with the aggressively relaxed manner of a new Silicon Valley convert. Despite his confidence, it soon became clear that he knew virtually nothing about epidemiology, biostatistics, health systems, or health policy. He was nevertheless convinced that cash and some programmers should be able to fix global health.
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Robot pal will keep older people active by pushing their buttons

Robot pal will keep older people active by pushing their buttons | Digital Health | Scoop.it
A designer robot that nags you to take your pills, go for a walk or phone your children could be your companion in old age.The Elli.Q resembles a small speaker with an attached tablet computer. It was created by the Swiss designer Yves Béhar and Intuitive Robotics, an Israeli company, and is being displayed at the New Old exhibition at the Design Museum.It can do similar things to the Amazon Echo smart speaker, such as switching on music or TV programmes, making Skype calls or turning up the heating in response to voice commands. However, unlike Echo, which waits for your orders, Elli.Q suggests activities based on your previous behaviour and recommendations by family members.
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UK's NHS trials AI app as alternative to medical helpline

UK's NHS trials AI app as alternative to medical helpline | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The UK National Health Service is to trial an artificially intelligent (AI) medical application in place of its NHS 111 non-emergency helpline.The app comes from Babylon Health, a UK start-up specializing in remote healthcare applications. It enables users to type their symptoms into a chat box – much like texting – and the app will perform triage for urgent but non-life-threatening conditions.The trial is set to start at the end of January, meaning that for the next six months more than 1.2m people in north central London will be able to access the app, according to the FT.
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Got a chronic disease? There will soon be a prescription app for that

The era of "Quantified Self" (a term coined in 2007 by US WIRED founding executive editor Kevin Kelly) is relatively new. The first Fitbit digital step counters launched in late 2009 and we've since seen an explosion of various wearables, apps and digital health devices all riding the exponential wave of smaller and cheaper mobile-connected and app-ified sensors and computing.
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Can wearable technology can help healthcare for the elderly?

Can wearable technology can help healthcare for the elderly? | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Recent studies indicate that by 2030 the United States population will be comprised of around 74 million elderly individuals1. Such a percentage is reason to look at new senior health solutions that can provide proper, swift and affordable care.Adults are living longer lives now, and they are experiencing new health, economic and living struggles. With many of the elderly experiencing health problems that include poor mobility, vision loss, hearing loss, communication barriers and memory loss, wearable technology can be helpful.
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Digital health investors see more money pouring into big data

Digital health investors see more money pouring into big data | Digital Health | Scoop.it
It was a session short on talk of actual dollars, but investor money will keep flowing into digital healthcare—under certain conditions.That’s the group consensus of four Wall Street bankers and a venture capital executive that spoke this morning in New York at the 2016 Digital Health Conference sponsored by the New York eHealth Collaborative.For next year healthcare investors—especially digital healthcare investors—will continue to look for start-up and growing technology companies that are developing consumer applications that solve problems, help to better structure predictive health information and better manage risk.
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Five User Types Are Key to Boosting Mobile Adoption in Healthcare

Five User Types Are Key to Boosting Mobile Adoption in Healthcare | Digital Health | Scoop.it
We currently see highly varied uses of mobile solutions in healthcare, from clinical applications to managed health, and perhaps even more diversity in the users themselves and how they engage with mobile healthcare. Too often, these users are treated as monoliths that either do or do not use mobile health solutions. But in order to see true gains in mobile adoption, more precise segmentation and understanding of these users is essential.
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How Can Wearable Technology Improve Cancer Treatment?

How Can Wearable Technology Improve Cancer Treatment? | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Current cancer treatment is based on episodic encounters. Even during chemotherapy, patients generally see their physician for maybe eight to ten minutes every three weeks, said Peter Kuhn, ATOM-HP’s co-lead researcher and a professor of medicine, biomedical engineering, and aerospace and mechanical engineering at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.“The more than 30,000 minutes between visits are a missed opportunity,” Kuhn said. “Technology can be leveraged to fill this gap and provide a comprehensive picture. The collected data can lead to better treatment decisions, better survival rates, and better understanding between physician and patient.”
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, December 8, 2016 7:54 AM

Maybe not. Read "The mHealth App Gap"; http://sco.lt/8einD7 

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Amazon nabs a top Box exec in health as it goes after the medical industry

Amazon nabs a top Box exec in health as it goes after the medical industry | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Amazon has landed another big health-tech hire, this time from Box.Missy Krasner, vice president and managing director of Box's healthcare and life sciences group, is headed to the e-commerce company, according to two sources familiar with the matter. The sources, who asked not to be named because the hire hasn't been announced, didn't know exactly what role she'll have.Krasner and Amazon did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
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Novo Nordisk and Glooko unveil first comarketed app for diabetes solutions

Novo Nordisk and Glooko unveil first comarketed app for diabetes solutions | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The first product from Novo Nordisk’s partnership with diabetes health tech startup Glooko has arrived.It’s an app called Cornerstones4Care Powered by Glooko, or the C4C app for short, and it allows people with diabetes to measure and track blood glucose, activities and meals.The app combines Novo Nordisk’s content and resources from its existing C4C online program and Glooko’s technology to sync blood glucose and activity data from almost any available diabetes or exercise device.David Moore, senior VP of marketing at Novo Nordisk, said the app is customizable, user friendly and reinforces the positive aspects of managing diabetes. The idea with this first app is to learn from it, as well as adapt and improve the specific C4C app, and work to create more digital offerings that can improve outcomes for patients. That also means taking lessons learned in diabetes digital health tech and applying them to other Novo treatment areas, such as obesity and weight management, and in rare diseases, where the company's focus is on growth disease disorders and hemophilia, he said.
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GSK asthma app wins healthcare technology award 

GSK asthma app wins healthcare technology award  | Digital Health | Scoop.it

GlaxoSmithKline mobile app that helps asthma patients better understand their condition and how to manage it was one of six winners at the AXA PPP Health Tech & You Awards.
MyAsthma, which was developed with UK agency The Earthworks, can track medicine usage and asthma attacks, and use location, weather and air quality data to learn what trigger’s a patient’s asthma.


An industry first, GSK’s app is the first from pharma has been approved as a Class 1 medical device and CE marked.

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Denise Silber's curator insight, May 16, 3:30 AM
Key insight here is that the app is CE marked as a device.
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Alphabet will track health data of 10,000 volunteers to 'create a map of human health'

Alphabet will track health data of 10,000 volunteers to 'create a map of human health' | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Verily, formerly Google's life sciences arm, is launching today a four-year study called Project Baseline to find out why people transition from being generally healthy to getting sick.The Silicon Valley-based company is working with its partners, Duke University and Stanford Medicine, to enroll 10,000 participants from diverse backgrounds at half a dozen study sites in California and North Carolina.The researchers are recruiting some people in good health, and others who are at high risk of chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease, and outfitting them with sophisticated health trackers and sequencing their genomes, among other things.
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Why Health Care Is Ripe For Digital Disruption

An estimated $1 trillion of the $3.3 trillion that the U.S. spends annually on health care is wasted — presenting an opportunity for disruption by tech startups. However, overcoming the protectionist tendencies of industry incumbents is one thing, dealing with outdated federal regulations is another. These laws include the Copeland Anti-kickback Act (1934), the Stark Law (1990) that bans a physician from doing referrals in which there is a conflict of interest, and the patient privacy HIPAA Act (1996). Created with noble intentions, these regulations are widely recognized barriers to aligning health care stakeholder relationships with the essential needs of the patients. They also impede digital-based solutions and stifle innovation, and as such need to be replaced with contemporary regulations that protect patient confidentiality while fostering greater flexibility and empowering digital transformation.
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Computer can tell doctors when your heart will fail

Computer can tell doctors when your heart will fail | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence software that can predict when a heart is going to fail by analysing scans of it beating has been developed by British scientists. The technology could help doctor
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Will artificial intelligence help to crack biology? | The Economist

Will artificial intelligence help to crack biology? | The Economist | Digital Health | Scoop.it

IN A former leatherworks just off Euston Road in London, a hopeful firm is starting up. BenevolentAI’s main room is large and open-plan. In it, scientists and coders sit busily on benches, plying their various trades. The firm’s star, though, has a private, temperature-controlled office. That star is a powerful computer that runs the software which sits at the heart of BenevolentAI’s business.

 

This software is an artificial-intelligence system.

AI, as it is known for short, comes in several guises. But BenevolentAI’s version of it is a form of machine learning that can draw inferences about what it has learned. In particular, it can process natural language and formulate new ideas from what it reads. Its job is to sift through vast chemical libraries, medical databases and conventionally presented scientific papers, looking for potential drug molecules.

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What the FDA did in digital health in 2016

What the FDA did in digital health in 2016 | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Over and above clearing a number of devices, the FDA had a busy year in 2016, passing a number of draft and final guidances related to digital health, having some notable conversations with vendors, and even turning down some devices whose FDA clearance was expected this year. We've rounded up the year's 510(k)'s in a separate article, but here's a rundown on some of the other actions the regulatory body took, as well as a brief look ahead at what 2017 might have in store for the FDA.
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As Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE approaches final stages, it offers glimpse of digital health journey

As Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE approaches final stages, it offers glimpse of digital health journey | Digital Health | Scoop.it
It’s come to this. More than four years after Qualcomm Foundation launched its $10 million Tricorder XPRIZE competition challenging companies to develop a 21st century version of a Star Trek medical device, the field of finalists has been whittled down to just two contenders. Final Frontier Medical Devices, based in the Philadelphia suburban town of Paoli, and Dynamical Biomarkers is based in Boston.Now these teams are entering the realm of live testing on consumers. The criteria for the contest means each team’s device has to measure five vital signs and test for 10 core conditions, including: anemia, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, leukocytosis, pneumonia, otitis media, sleep apnea, and urinary tract infection. Additionally, the devices are required to detect three elective health conditions from a set including strep throat, an HIV screen, hypertension, melanoma and shingles. They have to provide a diagnosis within minutes, according to the announcement.
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Art Jones's curator insight, March 15, 7:04 PM

 

By golly, Jim, I'm beginning to think I can cure a rainy day!

--DR. MCCOY, Star Trek: The Original Series, "The Devil in the Dark"

 

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The future of emotion sensing wearables

Humans are about 72% accurate at reading emotions from facial expressions, computer vision is already up to 82%. That's just the start. What's coming next are wearables that read exactly what is going on in your emotional health, not just physical, and align it with what's happening in your life.We've already explored some of the biofeedback tech looking to minimise stress along with the now and next of tracking health and happiness. One new way we can think about what's in store for emotion sensing is to break it down into input (tracking), analysis and algorithms, and output in the form of apps and exercises.
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Health Tech 2016: A Year To Recalibrate

Health Tech 2016: A Year To Recalibrate | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Among the key health technology lessons that 2016 has reinforced: biology is fiendishly complex; data ≠ insight; impacting health – whether making new drugs or meaningfully changing behavior – is hard; and palpable progress, experienced by patients, is starting to occur (and is tremendously exciting).
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Living with diabetes? Fitbit and Medtronic can help

Living with diabetes? Fitbit and Medtronic can help | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Soon, your Fitbit won’t just be monitoring how many steps you take in a day — it will also keep tabs on your glucose levels. On Tuesday, Medtronic and Fitbit announced a new partnership that seeks to “integrate health and activity tracking for patients living with diabetes and their physicians and care teams.” For the first time, Fitbit users will be able to take advantage of Medtronic’s medical technology and gain valuable insights into how their exercise regimens impact glucose levels, hopefully leading to better management of the condition. And of course, it’s manifesting itself as an app — myLog.
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Can this app help tackle the burden of diabetes?

Can this app help tackle the burden of diabetes? | Digital Health | Scoop.it
A new app combines data, artificial intelligence technology, human interaction and psychology to beat diabetes.Glyco Leap is the flagship product of Singapore-based digital health startup Holmusk. The digital program combines different health tools such as a fitness tracker and glucometer, interactive coaching from certified dietitians and a mobile application to help people manage or reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.The app is yet another example of growing innovations in health care that makes use of mobile technology. Organizations, including big and small firms, are increasingly looking at the different ways they can use mobile tech as more people rely on their phones for daily needs such as shopping, booking a cab or fitness tracking.
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