Digital Health
Follow
Find
87.2K views | +187 today
 
Scooped by Alex Butler
onto Digital Health
Scoop.it!

69% of People Track Health Stats, But Often Without a Gadget

69% of People Track Health Stats, But Often Without a Gadget | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The majority of you use your brain as your calendar and notebook when it comes to monitoring your health.
Alex Butler's insight:

I see this as demonstrating the future opportunity (as if we needed further evidence) that tracking heath through mobile technology will be second nature for the majority of people in the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Digital Health
The intersection between health and digital technology will herald a revolution for patients, healthcare professionals and pharmaceutical companies
Curated by Alex Butler
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

"The Healthcare revolution will not be televised"

My Presentation from Athens looking at 5 things digital can do to revolutionise pharmaceuticals (with a bit of Gil Scott Heron thrown in for good measure)

more...
Alex Butler's comment, August 13, 2013 4:31 AM
Thanks for watching Dan, appreciated :-)
Sophie Undreiner's curator insight, March 15, 2014 5:23 AM

@TedMed par Alex Butler

Vigisys's curator insight, November 2, 2014 5:10 AM

Une intéressante présentation (en anglais) qui aborde les principaux concepts qui seront fondateurs de l'e-santé à venir. Une belle inspiration pour le développement des futurs réseaux de santé numériques.

Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Google is using apps to find out what makes a person perfectly healthy

Google is using apps to find out what makes a person perfectly healthy | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Google confirmed today that it is currently testing a health software suite it calls the "Study Kit," made up of Android and iOS apps, and a Chrome extension, in the pilot for its Baseline Study project, developed by Google's experimental Google X wing and first detailed last July. According to TechCrunch, the testing comes ahead of a wider launch for the project scheduled for later this year. Baseline Study, which began as a limited trial at Stanford and Duke Universities, will take medical data from thousands of individuals to build a picture of ideal human health.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

The challenge of helping patients with chronic illness with mobile health

The challenge of helping patients with chronic illness with mobile health | Digital Health | Scoop.it
In the seven or so years I’ve been blogging, I’ve only written a few posts that prompted controversy in the comments section. Looking back, I notice that these posts have involved chronic illness management, motivation, adherence and/or engagement. In fact, a commentator recently felt my writing was that of an old-fashioned doctor who believes that paternalistic messaging is key to engaging patients in an effort to improve their health.

I’m paraphrasing but you can read the post and commentary for more context. This spirit prompted me to reflect on my writing and intent. I believe sincerely that our work at Partners Connected Health is patient-centered in every way, so why the disconnect?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Google Tests ‘Study Kit’ Apps To Collect Health Data Before Wider Launch Of Baseline Study This Year

Google Tests ‘Study Kit’ Apps To Collect Health Data Before Wider Launch Of Baseline Study This Year | Digital Health | Scoop.it
In July 2014, Google announced Baseline Study, a Google[x] “moonshot” that involves collecting and analysing diagnostics from people to paint a picture of “what it means to be healthy.” While Baseline Study started as a limited pilot with Duke University and Stanford University in July 2014 with 175 participants, TechCrunch has learned that Google is now preparing for the next stage of the project: a bigger launch for later this year.

As part of that, the company has confirmed that it is testing something called the “Study Kit,” the first apps that are being used to collect data.

Study Kit comes in the form of iOS and Android apps as well as a Chrome extension — all of which are currently only open to a limited number of registered participants in the Baseline pilot.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Mobile Health Technology Assists with Maternal Care, Epidemics

Mobile Health Technology Assists with Maternal Care, Epidemics | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Mobile health technology may be able to play a strong role in improving healthcare services in third world countries, as one case study illustrated the benefits mHealth brought to several nations in Africa. Whether it's in fighting the Ebola virus or providing maternal medical care, mobile health technology has offered key solutions that have improved the health of citizens in impoverished regions.

According to a report released by the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings, mobile health technology may be used to manage disease epidemics, maternal healthcare, and chronic conditions. In particular, telehealth platforms and wearable devices can better track patient health as well as the effectiveness of treatments and diagnostics.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

This Wearable Prototype Can See Through Skin To Scan Your Blood

This Wearable Prototype Can See Through Skin To Scan Your Blood | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Fitness trackers have hit something of a ceiling in what they can glean from your vitals.


Some like the Fitbit Charge HR and the Microsoft Band can monitor a user’s heart rate throughout the day, continuously — an impressive insight, but it’s about as far as the tech goes right now.


Wearables can’t see what’s going on inside your bloodstream.

Echo Labs, a small startup from the Stanford-affiliated Start X incubator, may be among the first to take health monitoring to the next level.

Their prototype wristband, two years in the making, can measure oxygen, CO2, PH, hydration and blood pressure levels in the blood, by using optical signals.

more...
Kim Kubiak's curator insight, June 1, 9:23 AM

What do you think about this prototype?

Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, June 1, 2:12 PM

Getting serious now!

Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Study: Wearable patch market holds promise, but challenges must be addressed

Study: Wearable patch market holds promise, but challenges must be addressed | Digital Health | Scoop.it
While wearable patch technology is a still-growing mHealth market, its future bodes bright as a worthwhile investment for providers and as a valuable consumer tool. However, currently there are challenges to the devices that need to be addressed, according to a recent Tractica report.

Connected wearable patches range from tattoos to small devices affixed to the skin, as defined by Tractica  The patches feature wireless connectivity for monitoring physiological data, delivering medication and more.

Tractica forecasts worldwide unit shipments will hit 12.3 million annually by 2020, a big jump from the 67,000 shipped in 2014. The market is expected to increase to $3.3 billion annually, states the research.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Doctor evidence brings valuable health data to IBM Watson ecosystem

Doctor evidence brings valuable health data to IBM Watson ecosystem | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Today, Doctor Evidence, a clinical health research data provider, announced a content partnership with IBM Watson to contribute valuable clinical cancer research content to Watson's oncology solutions and developer ecosystem. The partnership is part of IBM's work to help the medical community advance patient-centered care through its new Watson Health unit.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Digital Health Landscape Disrupted By This Colossal Clash [INFOGRAPHIC]

Digital Health Landscape Disrupted By This Colossal Clash [INFOGRAPHIC] | Digital Health | Scoop.it
There is a confluence of disruption closing in on the healthcare industry that could leave the next Chicxulub crater. This infographic highlights the merger of two trends:

Consumer companies are entering regulated healthcare markets
Clinical solution companies are adopting consumer design principles
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Digital health shown to benefit CVD outcomes and risk factors

Digital health shown to benefit CVD outcomes and risk factors | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and has a tremendous economic impact with costs upward of $200 billion annually.1 Risk factors include smoking, poor diet, and lack of physical activity.

There are numerous health-related apps and digital health technologies that seek to modify these risk factors. However, there is a lack of high-level evidence on the effect of digital health technologies on actual CVD outcomes. With a shift in focus on quality and outcomes in healthcare, evidence supporting a positive effect on outcomes is needed prior to the widespread adoption of digital health tools.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Mango Health uses Google Fit to add activity, blood pressure, weight tracking s

Mango Health uses Google Fit to add activity, blood pressure, weight tracking s | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Gamified medication adherence app maker Mango Health is moving beyond medications, using a new Google Fit integration to add tracking of blood pressure and weight, as well as activity tracking, into its app, the company announced today.

“From a patient or consumer’s perspective in the app, it leverages the existing paradigm around reminders, which we think is a very effective way to begin encouraging patient populations in other forms of even more proactive health,” CEO Jason Oberfest told MobiHealthNews. “So whether it’s recording blood pressure regularly, or moving regularly, monitoring glucose regularly, whatever the case may be, it was a very logical extension for the app.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

New App Aims To Make Caregivers’ Lives Much Easier

New App Aims To Make Caregivers’ Lives Much Easier | Digital Health | Scoop.it

A new mHealth app called Wellzilla is now available to both professional and family caregivers. The app is designed as both a communication tool, as well as a platform through which caregivers can purchase all of the over-the-counter medical supplies they require.


When speaking of medical supplies required for hygiene and other Activities of Daily Living, supplies are more affordable in Wellzilla because the app cuts out the middle man. The app currently has over 40,000 medical supplies, some of which are as much as 80% cheaper than paying the full retail price.


Aside from purchasing required medical supplies, the app allows caregivers to manage their patients through the app. They can create a patient profile to be shared with other family members or caregivers, and they can use the app to send pertinent notifications to a designated group of individuals.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

A use case for smartwatches that is literally saving lives

A use case for smartwatches that is literally saving lives | Digital Health | Scoop.it

About two weeks ago, a story was making the rounds on Android blogs about how a developer has made it possible to monitor blood glucose levels on Android Wear devices. I happen to have type 1 diabetes and I have been using this very software developed by Stephen Black on my LG G Watch for a couple of months now. I am super excited to see the work of Stephen Black get some exposure. He’s done some great work and it’s really made a difference in my daily life, but I think the posts making the rounds on the Internet missed out on really sharing how life-changing, even life-saving, this tool can be.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

mHealth fitness wearables need better consumer engagement

mHealth fitness wearables need better consumer engagement | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Fitness wearables and mobile health tracking devices continue growing in popularity. Companies like Fitbit sell millions of devices each year. But despite the health benefits, people stop using the product.


The adage of regular, moderate exercise and a proper diet being the simplest, surest ways to remain healthy still guides many people in their day-to-day health routines. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends 150 minutes of exercise per week, which amounts to about 7,000 to 8,000 steps per day—about 1,000 to 2,000 more than the average American walks daily, according to the Washington Post. But sometimes a healthy lifestyle isn’t easy to achieve and people fall short of hitting those goals.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

With UNICEF Wearables Get to Those Who Actually Need Them

With UNICEF Wearables Get to Those Who Actually Need Them | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) is keen on starting a revolution in the wearable tech field to help children and women. In a competition called Wearables for Good, UNICEF together with ARM and frog design will gather submissions from individuals or teams that want to leverage the the tech category for improving lives of those in need.

The international organizations wants wearables to be a dark horse and to replicate what mobile phones did to many communities in recent years. Mobile phones provided a low-cost, highly-available way of reaching out. For example, mobile phones created India’s “Baby’s Gurgle” which uses voice messaging to relay information to mothers during their different periods of pregnancy. Similar projects has since been adapted in other Asian communities.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Survey on #mhealth apps: surprising disconnect between patients and physicians

Survey on #mhealth apps: surprising disconnect between patients and physicians | Digital Health | Scoop.it
A recent survey by Research Now Group, a market research company based in Texas, sought to determine the usage of mobile health apps and their potential in healthcare.

The survey focused on some key issues including the use of smartphones by healthcare professionals in their clinical work, whether health care professionals find this technology beneficial for patients and for which types of patients, and the types of health apps used commonly and how users feel about the use of this technology for their health.

The survey included 1,000 healthcare professionals and 2,000 smartphone owners who indicated that they used mobile health apps. Half of the survey participants were from the United States and half from the United Kingdom. The survey occurred from January 9, 2015 to January 22, 2015.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Harnessing the Crowd to Solve Healthcare

Harnessing the Crowd to Solve Healthcare | Digital Health | Scoop.it
While being sick is never a good situation to be in, the majority of people can still take solace in the fact that modern medicine will be able to diagnose their problem and get them on the path to a quick recovery. For a small percentage of patients, however, simply finding out what ails them can be a challenge. Despite countless visits to specialists and mounting costs, these individuals can struggle for years to find out any reliable information about their illness.
more...
Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, June 2, 9:17 AM

A community of 15,000 "Dr House" to diagnose you... What else! 

Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Health app improves behaviors in recent randomized controlled trial

Health app improves behaviors in recent randomized controlled trial | Digital Health | Scoop.it
In a recent article published in Journal of Medical Internet Research, researchers from Hebrew University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel sought to determine if the use of an app (eBalance) would encourage people to live a healthy lifestyle as compared to people receiving lectures on healthy living.

This is a useful and practical research question with the increasing number of consumers/patients using apps to help them live healthy lives. Most of the apps currently on the market, even the most popular ones, lack evidence. So, this study, among others, helps provide some evidence regarding the potential benefits of this ever increasing category of apps.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Apple confirms Watch OS update tweaks heart rate monitoring

Apple confirms Watch OS update tweaks heart rate monitoring | Digital Health | Scoop.it
If you’re an Apple Watch owner with a keen interest in your health and fitness, you might have noticed some odd changes in heart rate monitoring since the roll-out of Apple Watch OS 1.0.1. Apple has confirmed that these changes are intentional, and the device is now monitoring heart rate less regularly as a deliberate feature rather than a bug.

Back in the days of Watch OS 1.0, heart rate was recorded every 10 minutes. Now — as users had noticed and Apple has now confirmed with an updated support page — readings aren’t taken as frequently if your arm is moving or your whole body is in motion. The tweak is probably aimed at eliminating erratic readings during exercise, but not all users are happy.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

The Internet of Things Can Revolutionize Healthcare, But Security is Key

The Internet of Things Can Revolutionize Healthcare, But Security is Key | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things Can Revolutionize Healthcare, But Security is Key By David Ting The Internet of Things (IoT) holds tremendous promise in healthcare, potentially enabling a digital health revolution and support the future of care delivery.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

A Revolution in the Making: How Mobile Applications are Evolving Healthcare

A Revolution in the Making: How Mobile Applications are Evolving Healthcare | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Can mobile apps benefit healthcare? How can mHealth apps be used by healthcare professionals? Find answers to these and learn more about mHealth and its benefits.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

A Google Preventive Wristband Hopes to Curb Diseases

A Google Preventive Wristband Hopes to Curb Diseases | Digital Health | Scoop.it

The tech giant has been granted a patent in the form of a wearable technology device that could identify any cell that "may be indicative of a medical condition"


Earlier this year Google proposed a new bracelet that is being described as a disease-fighting wearable technology. The pitch was recently accepted by the US Patent and Trademark Office, which shows the true potential of the product.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

The Tech Giants’ Plan to Mine Our Bodies for Data—and Profit

The Tech Giants’ Plan to Mine Our Bodies for Data—and Profit | Digital Health | Scoop.it
The consumer technology companies that own desktop software, Web search, and mobile phones have set themselves a new goal. They’re aiming to carve themselves a slice of health care, the US $3 trillion industry that represents nearly a fifth of the U.S. economy.

There’s a lot at stake here, and not just financially. Pundits have described a future in which your body is minutely and continuously monitored. Your wearables and assorted wireless-enabled gadgets—your bathroom scale, perhaps a blood-glucose monitor—would gather torrents of physiological data. Someday, the data might even come from biosensors worn on the body, like tattoos, or ultimately, from implanted devices. This flood of info would sluice to your smartphone before streaming off to the cloud. Apps could continuously monitor the data and, if it took an alarming turn, bring it to the attention of a medical professional. Although the quantities of data might well be huge, this vision could be realized with technologies available now or anticipated soon.
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, May 29, 6:21 PM

The heavyweight corporate muscle behind the vision comes from Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Samsung, which have all launched e-health initiatives, mostly based around smartphones and wearables. Indeed, the fast-growing health care business would seem a natural next step for the tech giants. Technology, including the sort of high-volume digital technology inside smartphones, is playing an increasingly important role in health care. And billions of dollars are now being spent converting the paper-based charts that doctors have long used into modern digital records. Devices, digital data—that’s what these tech giants do. Why shouldn’t they do it in health care, too?

Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Digital Agenda For Europe: A mhealth Green Paper

Digital Agenda For Europe: A mhealth Green Paper | Digital Health | Scoop.it

To follow up on the mHealth Green Paper, the European Commission has started paving the way for an industry-led Code of Conduct for mobile health apps. This initiative was presented during an mHealth stakeholder meeting at eHealth Week 2015. Find the results and polls of this meeting here.


On 12 May, at the eHealth Week in Riga, an mHealth stakeholder meeting took place. It interactively addressed ongoing and potential future policy actions in the field of mobile health (mHealth). The discussion built on the results of the public consultation on the Green Paper on mHealth, but also on the outcome of an ad-hoc consultation via the on-site voting system.

The meeting was attended by about 80 people, ranging from public authorities, ICT industry, and academia to healthcare professionals.

The following three topics were discussed:

  • Privacy and security
  • Safety and transparency
  • Web entrepreneurs' access to the market


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

The Mobile Patient: How mHealth Tools are Paving the Way for Better Care Management

The Mobile Patient: How mHealth Tools are Paving the Way for Better Care Management | Digital Health | Scoop.it
With a sweeping shift to patient-centered and value-based care, mobile health technologies are increasingly being used to improve care in unprecedented ways.
In the new healthcare, one which emphasizes comprehensive, team-based and accessible care, provider organizations will need to make concerted efforts to become more patient-centered.  For many providers,patient engagement is no easy task, but it’s certainly at the top of mind for healthcare CIOs.

Indeed, according to findings of the 26th Annual HIMSS Leadership Survey, sponsored by the Chicago-based Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) and released at the annual HIMSS conference this past April, patient satisfaction, patient engagement, and quality of care improvement have raced to the top of healthcare CIOs’ and senior IT executives’ agendas in the past year, a stark change from previous years which found that health IT leaders were more focused on business and financial goals. Nonetheless, it’s been a struggle for physicians to truly engage their patients, especially the 45 percent of U.S. adults with at least one chronic condition.



more...
DebbyBruck's comment, May 28, 6:19 AM
This sounds like a most helpful tool for patients and healthcare practitioners alike.
Scooped by Alex Butler
Scoop.it!

Researchers to study impact of digital health in kids’ physical education

Researchers to study impact of digital health in kids’ physical education | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Academics in Australia at the University of Queensland have launched a three-year research project that will examine the impact of using digital health tools in physical education programs with kids. The project has received $177,000 AUS (about $137,000 US dollars) from the Australian Research Council Discovery Grant and is being conducted in collaboration with researchers in Melbourne and Illinois.


University of Queensland Associate Professor Michael Gard, who works in the School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences plans to research the philosophical and educational consequences of using the tech with kids in PE programs. 

more...