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Could Technology Help Stem the Spread of Whooping Cough? - Forbes

Could Technology Help Stem the Spread of Whooping Cough? - Forbes | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Improving the exchange of information between doctors and public health officials could help stem outbreaks of diseases such as whooping cough and tuberculosis.
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Digital Health
The intersection between health and digital technology will herald a revolution for patients, healthcare professionals and pharmaceutical companies
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"The Healthcare revolution will not be televised"

My Presentation from Athens looking at 5 things digital can do to revolutionise pharmaceuticals (with a bit of Gil Scott Heron thrown in for good measure)

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Alex Butler's comment, August 13, 2013 4:31 AM
Thanks for watching Dan, appreciated :-)
Sophie Undreiner's curator insight, March 15, 5:23 AM

@TedMed par Alex Butler

Vigisys's curator insight, November 2, 5:10 AM

Une intéressante présentation (en anglais) qui aborde les principaux concepts qui seront fondateurs de l'e-santé à venir. Une belle inspiration pour le développement des futurs réseaux de santé numériques.

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Intel is swarming wearables as part of its Internet of Things strategy

Intel is swarming wearables as part of its Internet of Things strategy | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Intel missed being the leader in mobile tech, but it doesn’t want to miss the wearables wave. So the company is investing heavily in components for wearables, and that strategy is integrated with the company’s larger mission of providing tech for the Internet of Things (IoT), or connected everyday objects.


Not only will Intel design components for wearables, but it’s also designing its own wearable devices and partnering with the fashion houses and retailers that will sell them. Those wearables will provide a stream of data to Intel’s Internet of Things infrastructure, which will analyze and make sense of the data so that you can get insight into your life, such as how much you need to exercise or sleep

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Apple Watch will give health achievement awards

Apple Watch will give health achievement awards | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Apple’s microsite for their Apple Watch was recently updated, along with the health section.

While we’ve known when the watch was announced that Apple Watch would feature the three core concepts of “Move”, “Exercise”, and “Stand” — this is a good time to review other features the watch will have.
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How Smartphone Apps Can Treat Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia

How Smartphone Apps Can Treat Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Bryan Timlin always carries an iPhone and an Android phone.


The 57-year-old is an app and graphic designer with a Michigan company calledOptHub, but he doesn’t carry two phones for work. He carries the iPhone because that’s what he likes, and he carries the Android because it’s what he needs.


The Android phone monitors his behavior. Five years ago, Timlin was diagnosed with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder, a mental illness characterized by four or more manic or depressive episodes a year. Some episodes, he says, can last as long as eight weeks. “Being bipolar is like jumping out of an airplane knowing you don’t have a parachute on,” he says. “You know you’re going to be hurt, but the high is so euphoric that it’s worth the risk. You can deal with the consequences later.” With his Android phone, he hopes to deal with these moments in other ways.

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Karin Benckert's curator insight, November 21, 7:46 AM

Otroligt - det här är verkligen något som kan göra skillnad i människors liv. Och inte bara för den som är sjuk utan för alla människor.

Arielle Gold's curator insight, November 24, 2:10 PM

This article discusses one of the many smart phone applications that has been created in order to help alleviate the symptoms of Schizophrenia, and other unpredictable mental disorders (Alba, 2014). The primary application that is discussed is called "Priori" (Alba, 2014). Priori is designed to monitor a patient's tone when he is speaking, along with the periods of time that he isn't speaking (Alba, 2014). It focuses on the speed and tone of his talking, and any rapid changes in topic that may occur (Alba, 2014). Any offsets that Priori records in the patient's regular way of communicating may help him to better predict an impending Schizophrenic episode. These sort of episodes can not only be dangerous to ones-self, but potentially to those around the individual experiencing the episode (Myers & Myers, 2008). Symptoms may include something as basic as laughing or crying at inappropriate times, or potentially as severe as immobility and even hallucinations (Myers & Myers, 2008). Schizophrenia is considered to be one of the most severe examples of "psychosis," or "a broad term for a disorder marked by irrationality, distorted perceptions, and lost contact with reality (Myers & Myers, 2008, p. 562)," because it may not necessarily be consistent, and can be onset at any given time (Alba, 2014). With that being said, although Priori is still in it's developmental phase, this application has the potential to warn patients and their doctors of an impending episode, so that they can better prepare, and ideally make the episode minimally damaging to the patient, and those around him/her (Alba, 2014).

 

This article is very well-written, and appears to be reliable because of several different sources cited throughout, including Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman, a psychiatrist in chief at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center (Alba, 2014). Any scientific information that was included about Schizophrenia or other mental disorders seemed to be accurate because it was given to the author by physicians, and even an actual mental disorder patient, named Bryan Timlin (Alba, 2014). If I were to recommend any changes in order to help the author verify the accuracy of this article, I would suggest the inclusion of a full reference page that will give any contributors all of the credit that they deserve, while giving readers the tools to do some research on their own.

 

The following is the full-text citation of the textbook that I discussed in my review of this article, along with a citation for the article itself:

 

Alba, D. (2014, November 20). "How Smartphone Apps Can Treat Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia" - Wired. Retrieved from http://www.wired.com/2014/11/mental-health-apps/

 

Myers, D. G., & Myers, D. G. (2008). Schizophrenia. In Exploring Psychology in Modules(9th ed., pp. 562-568). Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books?id=ReckAAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&authuser=2&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&hl=en&output=reader&pg=GBS.PA568

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Combining mobile health with artificial intelligence

Combining mobile health with artificial intelligence | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Mobile developer GreatCall , which makes both smartphones and applications, and artificial intelligencecompany Automated Insights said they are partnering on a health app that helps caregivers stay informed on the well-being of aging family members.

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Samsung's health ambitions go way beyond wearables

Samsung's health ambitions go way beyond wearables | Digital Health | Scoop.it
As Samsung continues its push into health, there's a lot more to the company's plan than fitness trackers and sensors.
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Scientists Can Predict the Spread of Disease Using Wikipedia

Scientists Can Predict the Spread of Disease Using Wikipedia | Digital Health | Scoop.it
While Google couldn't track influenza particularly accurately using search analysis, a team of researchers reckons it can predict the spread of diseases using data lurking within Wikipedia.
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Why I'd Let Google Put My Genome in the Cloud

Why I'd Let Google Put My Genome in the Cloud | Digital Health | Scoop.it
For the past 18 months, according to the Tech Review, Google has been quietly rolling out a cloud computing service for DNA. Google Genomics could one day have millions of genomes on its servers, available at a click of a button to researchers. Are there legitimate privacy concerns here? Definitely, but it's not Google's grubby fingers you should worry about.
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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, November 10, 11:30 AM

Tailored medicine: "Suppose you child turns out to have a rare and mysterious genetic disease. Or suppose you come into the hospital with cancer. By comparing one genome sequence to millions of others in a database, we can begin untangling how to best treat individuals."

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Clinical studies harness mobile health interventions for mental health, chronic conditions

Clinical studies harness mobile health interventions for mental health, chronic conditions | Digital Health | Scoop.it

A smartphone platform to inform clinicians how frequently patients use their phones with a mix of passive and active tracking is the kind of mobile health tool that that could help inform clinicians of the emotional state of their patients. But Ginger.io‘s behavioral health platform has generated a lot of interest beyond therapists. Medical researchers want to evaluate its potential to identify when patients are depressed, since depression can play a big part in undermining medication adherence,particularly for chronic conditions.

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Art Jones's curator insight, November 6, 9:58 AM

"Sensors attached to patients’ phones can show how many calls they’re making or getting out of their house. Patients also receive questions that can be customized based on clinicians’ needs. Clinicians can view the passive and active data through a dashboard. It’s not so much a diagnostic tool as a way to help doctors have more meaningful conversations with patients. "


#mHealth

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Mobile Health Applications Behind Uganda's Remarkable Epidemics Fight

Mobile Health Applications Behind Uganda's Remarkable Epidemics Fight | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Dr. Eddie Mukoyo, the Assistant Commissioner, Resources, at the Ministry of Health has said Uganda's remarkable fight against epidemics such as Ebola and Marburg is to a large extent down to the ministry's swift adoption of mobile health applications.
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Nintendo's New Health Device Listens to You Sleep

Nintendo's New Health Device Listens to You Sleep | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Nintendo’s first entry into the “quality of life” business, which it plans to release by early 2016, is a device that tracks a user’s level of fatigue by monitoring sleep.


Nintendo president Satoru Iwata detailed the device at a meeting for investors in Tokyo on Thursday, following the release of the company’s second-quarter financial report.


“There is no argument that whether or not we have sound sleep or not significantly affects our health,” Iwata said, “and many of us recognize through our daily lives that accumulated fatigue makes it difficult to maintain good health.”


“Fatigue and sleep are themes that are rather hard to visualize in more objective ways. At Nintendo, we believe that if we could visualize them, there would be great potential for many people,” he said.

 New Health Device Listens to You Sleep

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malek's comment, October 31, 8:00 AM
hope one day, it will replace this mammoth device for sleep testing
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Fitbit announces Surge fitness 'superwatch' and two new fitness bands

Fitbit announces Surge fitness 'superwatch' and two new fitness bands | Digital Health | Scoop.it
More than a week after their existence was leaked, fitness tracker maker Fitbit has officially announced three new wearable devices. The Fitbit Charge is an update to Fitbit's previous Force fitness tracker, but the other two devices — the Charge HR and the Surge — include some powerful new technology that should allow users to get a picture of their health at all hours of the day. The Charge HR tracks a user's heart rate at all times, while Fitbit describes the $249 Surge as a "fitness super watch," built with GPS and eight sensors to track performance in multiple workouts and various sports. All three of the new devices will send data to Fitbit's tracking app so wearers can see their stats in graph form and set specific goals.
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Can Video Games Fend Off Mental Decline?

Can Video Games Fend Off Mental Decline? | Digital Health | Scoop.it
“Brain training” games have become big business, but the research is still unclear about whether they improve your brain overall.
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Sandy Williams Spencer's curator insight, October 24, 12:32 PM

I don't know about you, but I sure hope they help a little. They are too much fun to stop playing!

http://www.free-alzheimers-support.com

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How To Track Your Life With Apple Health

How To Track Your Life With Apple Health | Digital Health | Scoop.it
We've already taken a look at some of the features and capabilities of Google Fit, and Apple's own activity-tracking platform is now up and running too. Find out how you can use Apple's brand new app to monitor your daily exercise, improve your overall health, aggregate data from different sources and store your medical information.
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Helping teenage bullying victims with Code Blue app

Helping teenage bullying victims with Code Blue app | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Code Blue is a free mobile app designed to help young people suffering from depression or experiencing bullying through immediate support. By simply tapping the screen button, an alert is sent to pre-selected support members. The app is being developed by start-up Social Code, who help people manage their own health by providing behaviour change tools, real-time peer and professional support.


Code Blue will be a mobile support system for users, acting like a panic button for those who can’t articulate what they are feeling, yet desperately want support. People experiencing depression often find it hard to reach out for help. With Code Blue, they don’t need to worry about what to say, or how to ask for help, they can just tap the screen to let people they trust know they need them. These people can then call, text or show up in person to provide immediate support.

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Two-thirds of Americans willing to share health data with researchers

Two-thirds of Americans willing to share health data with researchers | Digital Health | Scoop.it
Alex Butler's insight:

According to a new survey from Truven Health Analytics and NPR, 68 percent of American consumers are willing to share health information with researchers, but this group of people is more likely to be wealthy, well-educated, and young.


Truven surveyed 3,000 Americans via landlines, mobile phones, and the web, with the group filtered by generation, education level and income level. They asked questions about physician connectedness and data privacy.

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mHealth App to Focus on Post-Op Care

mHealth App to Focus on Post-Op Care | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Using a $500,000 federal grant, UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health researchers are developing a smartphone app which allows patients to securely photograph and send images of their post-operative wounds to their doctor

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New App Uses ‘Rewards’ to Monitor Mood Disorders

New App Uses ‘Rewards’ to Monitor Mood Disorders | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Adrian Cunning’s startup, ThriveStreams, has released its first product, according to CNET.


The newly released app takes a gamified approach to mood tracking for those with conditions such as depression and bipolar disorder. Cunning was diagnosed as bipolar in 2002 and has said that his own battle with the disorder inspired him to serve others with mental health struggles.

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Doctor Prescribed Apps May Soon Be the New Norm in British Healthcare

Doctor Prescribed Apps May Soon Be the New Norm in British Healthcare | Digital Health | Scoop.it
According to the U.K.’s Telegraph, soon British doctors might be “prescribing” more apps than medications. A new government strategy calls for a Natio
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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, November 14, 9:29 AM

"The best technology developers and chosen apps would be branded with the NHS logo."

Keith McGuinness's curator insight, November 14, 8:12 PM

Until apps measure and report their effect on specific relevant health outcomes, the word "prescribe" must remain in quotation marks.  


A doctor does not prescribe a drug without trustworthy evidence of effectiveness.  Why is an app different from a drug in this respect?  Because apps are not a safety risk?  Effectiveness is still the objective; is it not?

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FTC in talks with Apple over health data protection – today's Open Thread

FTC in talks with Apple over health data protection – today's Open Thread | Digital Health | Scoop.it

According to Reuters, the US Federal Trade Commission is alive to the issues. It reports that the FTC is “seeking assurances from Apple that it will prevent sensitive health data collected by its upcoming smartwatch and other mobile devices from being used without owners’ consent”

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10 Ideas That Are About To Change Medicine Forever

10 Ideas That Are About To Change Medicine Forever | Digital Health | Scoop.it

The future of medicine has arrived.

No, we're not talking about robot surgeons, implantable memory-augmentation devices, or doctors wearing Google Glass. The game-changing innovations on this list are more than distant dreams or inventions no one really knows what to with yet. Most should be available as early as 2015.


Every year, the Cleveland Clinic comes up with a list of new devices or treatments that are expected to help improve our daily lives and reduce our risks of developing disease. Only time will tell whether their considerable promise pans out.


Here are the top 10 new medications, treatments, and technologies to watch for in 2015, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

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Kim Kubiak's curator insight, November 6, 11:24 AM

My favorites are #9 and #1.

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RunKeeper gets Google Fit compatibility with latest update

RunKeeper gets Google Fit compatibility with latest update | Digital Health | Scoop.it

 

Today, the extremely popular fitness-tracking app, RunKeeper, received a rather beefy update via the Play Store. The upgrade brings compatibility for Google’s recently-launched ‘Fit’ application, in addition to a multitude of bug fixes, stability improvements and speed optimizations.


“We know information is key when it comes to keeping track of and taking down your fitness goals. The Google Fit platform manages the data from all those different health apps and devices you’re using, putting them in one accessible place. We’re excited to see how your RunKeeper experience interacts with all that, so we can be even smarter about how we help you set and reach your fitness goals,” states RunKeeper on it official blog.

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Aging US population spurs mobile health, remote patient monitoring

Aging US population spurs mobile health, remote patient monitoring | Digital Health | Scoop.it
As the U.S. population continues to age, the demand for remote patient monitoring, video telemedicine and mobile health will intensify, predicts Frost & Sullivan.
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Kim Kubiak's curator insight, November 4, 11:15 AM

Something for clinicians to keep in mind...

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Open thread: Microsoft Health's big advantage is cross-platform support

Open thread: Microsoft Health's big advantage is cross-platform support | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Microsoft has been winning generally approving headlines for its Microsoft Band fitness tracker and accompanying Microsoft Health platform, since both were revealed – seemingly unintentionally at first – on Wednesday.


One of the key points about both hardware and software is their cross-platform nature: they won’t just be restricted to people with a Windows Phone smartphone and/or a computer running the Windows OS. They’ll also support Android, iOS and Mac.


Microsoft Health is also open to other devices and apps, with Jawbone’s Up and the apps MapMyFitness, MyFitnessPal and RunKeeper the first to be announced.

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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, October 31, 9:19 AM

“We plan to have a regular cadence of Microsoft Health announcements including additional device and service partnerships, SDK availability and additional cross-platform applications and services,” blogged Microsoft’s Todd Holmdahl.

Bart Collet's comment, October 31, 12:23 PM
true! aggregate or die!
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Nike CEO Hints at Continued Partnership With Apple to Develop Stylish Fitness Wearables

Nike CEO Hints at Continued Partnership With Apple to Develop Stylish Fitness Wearables | Digital Health | Scoop.it

Nike CEO Mark Parker sat down with Bloomberg's Stephanie Ruhle to discuss the company's brand and product strategy (via The Guardian). During the 13-minute-long "Market Makers" segment, Parker confirmed that he is bullish on Apple and the wearables market, hinting at a continued partnership between the two companies at the 9:45 mark. 

Though Nike recently discontinued further development on its FuelBand fitness wearables, the sports and fitness company is not ready to abandon the wearables market, instead waiting for the market to mature beyond it current geeky status.


"I think it’s going to be a big part of the future, absolutely," said Parker. "I think the form it takes is critical. You can go from the very geeky kind of wearables today – we’ve all seen some of those – to what I think you’ll see in the future, things that are more stealth, more integrated, more stylish and more functional, yes."
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How Welltok tapped IBM's Watson to upgrade its health optimization platform

How Welltok tapped IBM's Watson to upgrade its health optimization platform | Digital Health | Scoop.it
How Welltok tapped IBM’s Watson to upgrade its health optimization platform
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