Health Care IT Strategy
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Healthcare & Data: Partners At Last - InformationWeek

Healthcare & Data: Partners At Last - InformationWeek | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
InformationWeek Healthcare & Data: Partners At Last InformationWeek When the securities industry fell that year, I went to work for one of my clients, a healthcare company.
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Data Security Plans on the Rise in Health Care Industry, Other Sectors - iHealthBeat

Data Security Plans on the Rise in Health Care Industry, Other Sectors - iHealthBeat | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
Data Security Plans on the Rise in Health Care Industry, Other Sectors iHealthBeat Organizations, including those in the health care industry, have made progress in the adoption of data security plans, according to a new report from the Ponemon...
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Report: Meaningful Use has not improved health IT enough - EHRIntelligence.com

Report: Meaningful Use has not improved health IT enough - EHRIntelligence.com | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
Report: Meaningful Use has not improved health IT enough EHRIntelligence.com We will move swiftly in the next few months to refresh our Federal Health IT Strategic Plan and then to build a national consensus agenda on health IT.
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3 Ways to Save Lives and Cut Healthcare Costs

3 Ways to Save Lives and Cut Healthcare Costs | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
You know the cost of healthcare in the United States is high, but the statistics are truly staggering.
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Arizona Begins Implementation of New Roadmap Focused on Health IT and ... - PR Newswire (press release)

Arizona Begins Implementation of New Roadmap Focused on Health IT and ...
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Jobs boom anticipated in health information technology - Examiner.com

Jobs boom anticipated in health information technology - Examiner.com | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
Examiner.com Jobs boom anticipated in health information technology Examiner.com The growing sophistication of health information technology continues to dramatically impact all aspects of modern healthcare.
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The doctor visit of the future may be a phone call

The doctor visit of the future may be a phone call | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
More states require insurers to cover health care by phone or Internet..
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Physician outcry on EHR functionality, cost will shake the health information ... - ModernMedicine

Physician outcry on EHR functionality, cost will shake the health information ... - ModernMedicine | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
Physician outcry on EHR functionality, cost will shake the health information ...
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Time to Design a Revised National ICD-10 Deployment Strategy

Time to Design a Revised National ICD-10 Deployment Strategy | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
Piecing together recent industry surveys of ICD-10 readiness paints a sobering picture: The Medical Group Management Association recently concluded that only 10% of the nation’s physician practice...
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Social Media Attitudes in Healthcare Slowly Changing

Social Media Attitudes in Healthcare Slowly Changing | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
The healthcare industry has been slow and cautious adopters of social media, but according to a 2013 study, attitudes are changing and providers are starting to understand the opportunities social media offers to build trust and loyalty with patients. One-third of health consumers have sought information on the web related to other patients’ experiences. Four out of 10 consumers say they’veused social media to find health-related consumer reviews about treatments or physicians. The industry can ignore social media as long as it chooses to, but it doesn’t stop patients from communicating online. Healthcare professionals need to embrace social media today. Healthcare providers who join the digital conversation can extend healthcare beyond the office. A solid social media listening and response program also enables providers to stay on top of potential issues and correct them before they turn into problems on HCAHPS surveys. A recent study (published in the Journal of Communication in Healthcare) fromIdeahaus CEO Kevin Popovic surveyed over 100 healthcare communicators on their attitudes of healthcare-related social media use. Here are four main takeaways:% of healthcare professionals who believe… (low % graph)1. Healthcare professionals don’t think the Food and Drug Administration is doing an adequate monitoring job or has the resources it needs to do so. A possible reason that healthcare industry is lagging behind other industries might be due to the FDA lack of guidance. Only 8% of healthcare professionals surveyed (CIOs, CEOs, marketing directors, brand managers) believe the FDA is “doing an adequate job in managing the use of social media.” Only 8% believe the FDA has the resources to improve. The FDA has provided rules for other communication channels, so some providers are continuing following those rules for social media as a similar precedent. 2. Healthcare professionals are split on the practice of monitoring social media sites to understand patients needs, concerns, and perception. There is much uncertainty surrounding the adoption of social media platforms for a company’s marketing mix. For instance, 51% believe that healthcare companies are misusing social media, while 49% believe companies are not. The key is to focus on creating a reliable, authentic, responsible voice that meets compliance needs and matches the tone of your traditional marketing efforts.% of healthcare professionals who agree… (high % graph)3. Authentic, responsible one-on-one conversation is still a challenge. The respondents were given the choice of platform and channel appropriateness and the results were:68% YouTube62% LinkedIn60% Facebook42% Twitter30% FlickrThis goes to show that so far communicators are comfortable speaking in a mass communication way of one-to-many. They have greater difficulty engaging one-to-one where they no longer are just sharing information. Maybe this is due to uncertainty of what is legal and isn’t. (Our whitepaper can help you through this.) 4. If a company wants to use social media, they have to be prepared to manage the challenges of the medium. Don’t jump into the social media space unprepared. Learn from others and make sure to stay up-to-date on the latest rules and regulations. Don’t just broadcast, have conversations. Listen, monitor and respond with transparency and built up trust. What are some of the social media challenges that you face as a healthcare provider? Do you agree with these findings?
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Top five technology trends that will 'reset' IT in 2014 | Information Age

Top five technology trends that will 'reset' IT in 2014 | Information Age | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
With a disruptive 2013 coming to a close, Progress, IT departments are looking forward to 2014 when the enterprise will 'hit the reset button' (http://t.co/BSzRNwaNq0)...
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9 Digital Health Trends For 2014

9 Digital Health Trends For 2014 | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
Healthcare IT is surging with activity -- so much that it's hard to predict which trends are likely to have the biggest impact in 2014. That said, it looks like EHRs will take a back seat; breakthroughs in electronic documentation are not expected in the near future. Other applications and devices, particularly those related to mobile health and big data, are taking off.With all that in mind, here are some trends worth watching in the New Year.1. Wearable monitors A Consumer Electronics Association surveyreleased this month found that 13% of US adults are interested in purchasing wearable fitness devices (versus 3% in 2012), and 9% of consumers actually own such devices.Wearable devices are not being used much to manage chronic conditions, but that could change. A number of such devices have been developed, and some are being tested. For example, as part of the University of California San Francisco's Health eHeart study, iHealth's mobile blood pressure monitor is being used to measure flow-mediated dilation, a heart health indicator traditionally gauged by ultrasound tests.Eric Topol, MD, director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute, predicted in a HIMSS keynote speech last winter that, over time, consumers will start wearing or using sensors to measure their activity and changes in their vital signs. But Jonathan Collins, principal analyst for ABI Research, said that, before that happens, physicians will need to accept and value physiological data generated by wearables and other mobile devices.[Cognitive computing will drive dramatic improvements in healthcare, says IBM. Read more: IBM Predicts Next 5 Life-Changing Tech Innovations.]2. Smart sensors As the aging-in-place sector of the healthcare industry grows, smart sensors that track the locations, routines, and activity of elderly people at home and in assisted living facilities are being more widely used. This telecare branch of telehealth includes emergency response systems, geolocators, and other kinds of devices that use smart sensors."Sensors can alert family members, for instance, if the patient has not risen and walked around in the morning, or if the lights have not been turned on during expected hours," a recent CSC report said. "Integrated sensors built into the home and/or worn by patients can enable geo-fencing and location-based alerting."A new AT&T emergency response system uses accelerometers, magnetometers, and gyroscopes to track users' daily activities. If an elderly person falls and can't push the emergency button on a pendant, the device can identify the fall as a break from the patient's routine and alert a monitoring center.3. Telehealth The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has blazed a trail in telehealth that the private sector may follow as it tries to contain costs and increase access. In fiscal year 2012, nearly half a million veterans received care remotely from 150 VA medical centers and 750 outpatient clinics. That included remote consultations, home monitoring, and store-and-forward services. Nearly 150,000 veterans participated in virtual visits with physicians, and remote monitoring made it possible for 42,000 patients to stay at home rather than being institutionalized.The private sector lags far behind the VA but is starting to catch up in remote consultations. This trend has been fueled largely by health plans, which pay telehealth services to connect physicians with patients who might otherwise visit an ER or an urgent care center. American Well, one of the leaders in this field, recently started selling its service directly to consumers.One obstacle to these initiatives is a patchwork of state laws that are inconsistent and often obstruct telehealth providers. Proposed legislation in Congress aims to reduce this confusion by giving states some guidance on telehealth regulations.4. Google Glass v. Kinect Google Glass's potential in the operating room is generating excitement among surgeons. Philips and Accenture recently demonstrated a prototype of a system that allows surgeons to view vital signs on a head-mounted Google Glass display while performing operations. In a Birmingham, Ala., hospital,surgeon Brent Ponce used the camera built into Google Glass to beam images of a shoulder operation to a colleague in Atlanta, who used a Glass app to share observations with Ponce virtually. Similar experiments are likely in 2014.Microsoft Kinect, a motion-sensing technology used in video games, has shown it can help surgeons manipulate images in the OR while preserving a sterile field. Kinect allows a surgeon to rotate or enlarge images on a screen without touching a keyboard and wasting precious time by having to scrub in again. A 2012 study validated that the system can discriminate between intentional and unintentional gestures most of the time. Could Glass and Kinect be somehow paired together?5. Speech recognition Natural language processing is still far from ready for use in EHRs, but progress is being made. For example, Intermountain Healthcare has been testing what it calls the industry's first speech-enabled mobile app for computerized physician order entry. The pilot started with commonly prescribed medications and is expected to progress to lab orders. Meanwhile, a growing number of EHR vendors are incorporating speech recognition into the mobile versions of their applications.6. IBM Watson Judging by IBM Watson's activities in healthcare this year, we're likely to see more and more applications and innovations powered by the learning-capable supercomputer. IBM and the Cleveland Clinic have developed big data analytic tools that use Watson. The MD Anderson Cancer Center is using Watson in its Moon Shots program to find cures for eight types of cancer. IBM and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have co-created an oncology adviser that helps physicians select the best treatments for particular patients. WellPoint is using two Watson-based products it developed with IBM to streamline the insurance company's utilization review and prior authorization processes.7. M-health apps If the market for mobile health apps is ever going to take off, consumers and providers must have some way of distinguishing among the tens of thousands of apps on the market. The most comprehensive initiative in this area wasrecently unveiled by IMS Health, a research firm best known for its data on the pharmaceutical industry. IMS is offering ratings on all the 40,000-plus m-health apps in the Apple Store (or at least the 16,000 that are really health-related and consumer-oriented). It is also marketing a system for creating m-health "formularies" and prescribing these apps to patients.HealthTap and Partners Healthcare's Center for Connected Health have created m-health curation offerings on a smaller scale. Happtique recently withdrew its m-health ratings program but may soon return to the fray. Competition in this area seems likely to heat up in 2014.8. Cloud-based EHRs There's nothing new about these products, formerly known as ASP-model EHRs. But a recent Black Book survey indicated that many independent physician practices are migrating to the cloud for integrated EHR/practice management systems. One reason is that these systems require a much smaller initial investment than client/server systems -- a benefit especially important when practices are switching EHRs to meet the Meaningful Use requirements. In addition, some groups use cloud vendors to outsource their revenue cycle management. The exemplar of this approach is Athenahealth, which beat out several bigger EHR vendors in a KLAS survey that ranked the usability of their products.9. HISPs Secure clinical messaging using the Direct protocol is expected to spread rapidly in 2014, mainly because of the information sharing requirements of Meaningful Use stage 2. As Direct grows, so will the number of health information service providers (HISPs), which are required to move messages and attachments securely between providers.One key barrier to the development of this network is the inability of many HISPs to exchange information with one another. This is not a technical issue; it stems from a lack of trust among HISPs. DirectTrust, a nonprofit trade association, is addressing this problem by accrediting HISPs. The next step will be to create a national provider directory that lets providers use one HISP to locate the Direct addresses of providers that use other HISPs.
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Why We Collaborate | First Class Collaboration

Why We Collaborate | First Class Collaboration | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it

What motivates dozens, thousands, even millions of people to come together on the Internet and commit their time to a project for free? What is the key to making a successful collaboration work?

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Health care data: Nashville's next big thing - The Tennessean

Health care data: Nashville's next big thing - The Tennessean | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
The Tennessean Health care data: Nashville's next big thing The Tennessean Health care organizations, such as Kaiser Permanente, are planning data systems that can hold petabytes of data, literally 1 billion four-drawer filing cabinets or 4,400...
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Kitted out for defence: safeguarding the wearable workforce | Information Age

Kitted out for defence: safeguarding the wearable workforce | Information Age | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
The intricacies of security and authentication with wearable devices in the workplace are still in their early stages of being worked out, but one thing is definite- they're going to make waves across a vast variety of industry sectors, and businesses...
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Culture Eats Strategy For Breakfast | TechCrunch

Culture Eats Strategy For Breakfast | TechCrunch | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
I used to think corporate culture didn’t matter. Discussion of vision, mission and values was for people who couldn’t build product or sell it! We had..
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The Many Components of Aetna's Tech Strategy: CTO - Insurance & Technology

The Many Components of Aetna's Tech Strategy: CTO - Insurance & Technology | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
The Many Components of Aetna's Tech Strategy: CTO Insurance & Technology In response, IT departments, indeed entire organizations, now see technology not as a set of tools but as opportunities to connect with their customers.
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The Use and Misuse of Information Technology in Health Care: Several Doctors Reply

The Use and Misuse of Information Technology in Health Care: Several Doctors Reply | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
One of them writes, "There is a very American tendency to look for technological fixes for significant problems. In general, technological fixes only work in the context of appropriate institutional structures." (New post: "The Use and Misuse of ...
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Bad quality data costing Australia’s healthcare industry millions

Bad quality data costing Australia’s healthcare industry millions | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
Greater adoption of the global GS1 System of supply chain standards and the National Product Catalogue (NPC) has the potential to significantly improv...
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IBM Watson's impressive healthcare analytics capabilities continue to evolve - TechRepublic

IBM Watson's impressive healthcare analytics capabilities continue to evolve - TechRepublic | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
IBM Watson's impressive healthcare analytics capabilities continue to evolve TechRepublic My thoughts about needs hierarchies were rekindled during a recent call that IBM Research held with industry analysts.
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Gaming healthcare: How Microsoft Kinect is revolutionizing the future of rehab - TechRepublic

Gaming healthcare: How Microsoft Kinect is revolutionizing the future of rehab - TechRepublic | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
Gaming healthcare: How Microsoft Kinect is revolutionizing the future of rehab TechRepublic "We wanted to improve motivation so patients can be excited and engaged in the programs," said Daniel Schacter, COO and co-founder of healthcare startup...
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The Weird Strategy Dr. Seuss Used to Create His Greatest Work (And Why You Should Use It, Too)

The Weird Strategy Dr. Seuss Used to Create His Greatest Work (And Why You Should Use It, Too) | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
Dr. Seuss was given 50 words. That was the size of his canvas. His job was to see what kind of picture he could paint with those words. You and I are given similar constraints in our lives. (The Weird Strategy Dr.
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Why keeping it simple is a good strategy even for innovators

Why keeping it simple is a good strategy even for innovators (Why Keeping it Simple is a Good Strategy Even for Innovators http://t.co/mq22iaxfmC)
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Social Media in Healthcare - A Transformation.

Social media has moved beyond being a tool for young individuals to share their private lives (pictures, messages) to fostering serious discussion on technolog
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Patient Engagement and SMS

Patient Engagement and SMS | Health Care IT Strategy | Scoop.it
It’s almost a cliché that providers need to reach patients where they want to connect, yet there is an existing option being underused. No, it’s not mHealth applications – but it has demonstrated some “astounding” results. “We tend to think about apps when we think about mobile, and apps are great,” said Travis Good, MD, CEO of catalyze.io, during the AHIMA Convention last Tuesday morning in Atlanta. “But there are simpler solutions we might think about when engaging patients.” SMS, texting and e-mail are chief among those. Patient “response and bill pay rates are completely and totally astounding. I mean I’m floored by it,” Good said. “Messaging is something we tend not to think about.” Because of HIPAA restrictions, Good said, many doctors are also discouraged by SMS, but “HIPAA does allow patients to opt-in to receive SMS messages,” he added. Although there are not many healthcare-centric SMS services right now, that’s changing. And based on preliminary results and the fact that so many patients have SMS-capable phones, that could change quickly. more at http://healthworkscollective.com/node/134701
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