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Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Innovation in healthcare, medicine and life sciences
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New Medical Device Treats Epilepsy With A Well-Timed Zap

New Medical Device Treats Epilepsy With A Well-Timed Zap | Health care | Scoop.it
The pacemaker-like device is intended for patients whose epilepsy can't be controlled with drugs.

Via ehealthgr
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Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Cell Therapy & Regenerative Medicine
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Directed differentiation of human pluripotent cells to ureteric bud kidney progenitor-like cells

Directed differentiation of human pluripotent cells to ureteric bud kidney progenitor-like cells | Health care | Scoop.it

A team of researchers from the Center of Regenerative Medicine in Barcelona (CMRB), the Salk Institute in California and the Hospital Clinic in Barcelona creates three-dimensional kidney structures in culture using human stem cells.


Via Ella Buzhor
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Ella Buzhor's curator insight, November 18, 2013 7:06 AM

Human pluripotent cells differentiated into ureteric-bud-committed renal progenitor-like cells. These cells demonstrated specific expression of renal progenitor markers. Further maturation into ureteric bud structures was accomplished by establishment of 3-D cultures.

http://www.nature.com/ncb/journal/vaop/ncurrent/pdf/ncb2872.pdf

Carlos Garcia Pando's curator insight, November 19, 2013 3:05 AM

Great news again. 

Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Cell Therapy & Regenerative Medicine
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Stem Cells Build "Biobridges" to Aid Brain Repair

Stem Cells Build "Biobridges" to Aid Brain Repair | Health care | Scoop.it
University of South Florida (USF) scientists have suggested a new strategy for stem cell-mediated brain repair following trauma. In several preclinical experiments, the USF group found that transpl...

Via Ella Buzhor
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Ella Buzhor's curator insight, November 8, 2013 5:12 AM

SB623, Notch1-transfected mesenchymal stem cells, have been shown to restore function to damaged neurons associated with stroke, traumatic brain injury, retinal diseases, and Parkinson's disease. SB623 cells function by promoting the body's natural regenerative process. 

 SB632 transplantation in rat models demonstarated better motor and neurological functions and reduced brain tissue damage. SB623 is in early clinical testing for stroke.

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What type of patient?

What type of patient? | Health care | Scoop.it
Last week I discussed the homeopath’s preparation for a second consultation with a patient, and how the patient’s report might be assessed. This week, let’s look a little more closely at the patient herself.

Via Cottesloe Naturopathic Clinic
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Cottesloe Naturopathic Clinic's curator insight, November 11, 2013 6:46 AM

An excellent article by Dr John English on the types of patients the homeopath has to face. Those who tell the truth, those who don't, those who want to please, those who don't really want to get well, those who want to prove you can't fix them, and so on... Strategies for the homeopath to deal with these situations and find the remedy...

Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Digital Health
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Join the largest mobile health community on Google+

Join the largest mobile health community on Google+ | Health care | Scoop.it

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Alex Butler's curator insight, October 30, 2013 11:48 AM

Mobile Health is not just the delivery of healthcare services via mobile communication devices but a revolution in patient involvement in their own health and wellness. Combined with Big Data it forms the core of 21st Century digital health

Sven Awege's curator insight, October 31, 2013 5:29 AM

It's fast become the elephant in the room.

Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Medicine in Pictures
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Big Data is a Big Deal in Healthcare

Big Data is a Big Deal in Healthcare | Health care | Scoop.it
Sharon Terry, President and Chief Executive Officer of Genetic Alliance, asserts, "I find myself becoming increasingly optimistic that we are approaching a tipping point for the consumer movement in health." ["Big Data Is Good for Your Health,"...

Via Aditya Patkar
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Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Medicine in Pictures
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Diabetes: The Silent Epidemic

Diabetes: The Silent Epidemic | Health care | Scoop.it
Health Infographics - Diabetes Infographic. Diabetes: The Silent Epidemic. Facts About Diabetes. The Diabetes Treatments.

Via Aditya Patkar
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Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Medicine in Pictures
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Medical breakthrough gives hope for disabled to regain use of limbs

Medical breakthrough gives hope for disabled to regain use of limbs | Health care | Scoop.it

Trials of the technology are still in the early stages, but ­better-than-expected ­results raise prospects of saving limbs lost in accidents or eventually overcoming paraplegia and quadriplegia.

St Vincent’s Hospital researchers have built and implanted a bridge between severed nerves in areas too large and complex to be healed by conventional nerve grafts.

After successfully restoring the feeling and partial use of legs in rats missing the main nerve to their limbs, director of neurosciences Prof Mark Cook said new trials had begun to see how far the technology can allow nerves to regrow in the hope it can be expanded to humans studies in the next two to five years.


Via Aditya Patkar
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61 Online and Social Media Resources for Motivating People to Create

61 Online and Social Media Resources for Motivating People to Create | Health care | Scoop.it
Long plane flights are my most-prized creative times. With the opportunity to be free from the many distractions that drain creative energy, long plane flights always lead to many new ideas. Last S...
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Infographic: The Impact of Sensors in Healthcare on Patient Care

Infographic: The Impact of Sensors in Healthcare on Patient Care | Health care | Scoop.it
 

The above  infographic created by Pathfinder Software illustrates how wireless sensors in healthcare is poised to reshape healthcare to help

Via Aditya Patkar
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BMC Cancer | Full text | Classical homeopathy in the treatment of cancer patients - a prospective observational study of two independent cohorts

BMC Cancer | Full text | Classical homeopathy in the treatment of cancer patients - a prospective observational study of two independent cohorts | Health care | Scoop.it
Many cancer patients seek homeopathy as a complementary therapy. It has rarely been studied systematically, whether homeopathic care is of benefit for cancer patients.

Via Cottesloe Naturopathic Clinic
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Cottesloe Naturopathic Clinic's curator insight, October 28, 2013 9:03 AM

This prospective observational study of cancer patients treated by individualised classical homeopathy showed an improvement in quality of life and a decrease in fatigue symptoms.

Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
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Information Does Not Equal Insight

Information Does Not Equal Insight | Health care | Scoop.it

It has long been assumed in the BI community that more information is "a good thing" when it comes to making better decisions. Except when there is too much information...when we encounter information overload.This leads us to look beyond information as the sole or, even, majority basis for decision making. Rational choice theory has long held sway as the foundation of thinking about business decision making. In recent years, the roles of intuition, gut-feeling, emotional state and intention are slowly coming to the fore as possible contributors. 


Via Bonnie Hohhof
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George Hristovski's curator insight, October 17, 2013 3:19 PM
We are providing the best general contractors services in Vancouver and surrounding areas.
Tony Moore's curator insight, October 17, 2013 4:08 PM

Access to real time customer/member data highly important.

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US employers slashing worker hours to avoid Obamacare insurance ...

US employers slashing worker hours to avoid Obamacare insurance ... | Health care | Scoop.it
Trend sparks fears among low-paid workers that they will be hit twice: by having earnings cut and paying more for healthcare.
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Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Digital Health
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Robots Let Doctors 'Beam' Into Remote Hospitals

Robots Let Doctors 'Beam' Into Remote Hospitals | Health care | Scoop.it
Remote presence robots are allowing physicians to "beam" themselves into hospitals to diagnose patients and offer medical advice during emergencies.

Via Alex Butler
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Art Jones's curator insight, November 18, 2013 6:06 PM

#ROBOTICS

Emma Sands's curator insight, November 19, 2013 4:49 AM

Una opción efectiva para maximizar el "expertise" de los especialistas sin las barreras del mundo físico. Pero, ¿qué otras barreras habría que solucionar? ¿Contractuales? ¿Legales? ¿Costes iniciales?

Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Work Up a Sweat, and Bargain Better

Work Up a Sweat, and Bargain Better | Health care | Scoop.it

If better health isn’t enough incentive to take a brisk walk, perhaps there is another one: it may get you a better deal.

 

New research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology offers a twist on the adage “never let them see you sweat,” says Jared Curhan, associate professor of organization studies at M.I.T.’s Sloan School of Management, and one of the study’s co-authors. “If you’re sweating, and your heart rate is up, it’s seen as a sign something is going wrong, that you’re too nervous, off-balance, flustered,” he said. “Whereas we’re showing that something could be very right.”


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:10 PM

A new study from M.I.T. links a raised heart rate to success in negotiations.

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Bioactivity Enhancement of Herbal Supplements by Intestinal Microbiota Focusing on the Ginsenosides

Bioactivity Enhancement of Herbal Supplements by Intestinal Microbiota Focusing on the Ginsenosides | Health care | Scoop.it

Intestinal microbiota contributes to diverse mammalian processes including the metabolic function of drugs. It is a potential new territory for drug targeting, especially for dietary herbal products. Because most of herbal drugs are orally administered, the chemical profile and corresponding bioactivities of herbal medicines may be altered by intestinal microbiota.

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Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from The future of medicine and health
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Hair, bone and soft tissue regrown in mice by enhancing cell metabolism

Hair, bone and soft tissue regrown in mice by enhancing cell metabolism | Health care | Scoop.it

Anyone who has left youth behind them knows that bumps and scrapes don't heal as fast as they used to. But that could change with researchers at the Stem Cell Program at Boston Children's Hospital finding a way to regrow hair, cartilage, bone, skin and other soft tissues in a mouse by reactivating a dormant gene called Lin28a. The discovery could lead to new treatments that provide adults with the regenerative powers they possessed when very young.

Lin28 is a gene that is abundant in embryonic stem cells and which functions in all organisms. It is thought to regulate the self-renewal of stem cells with the researchers finding that by promoting the production of certain enzymes in mitochondria, it enhances the metabolism of these cellular power plants that found in most of the cells of living organisms. In this way, Lin28 helps generate the energy needed to stimulate the growth of new tissues.

"We already know that accumulated defects in mitochondrial metabolism can lead to aging in many cells and tissues," says Shyh-Chang Ng. "We are showing the converse – that enhancement of mitochondrial metabolism can boost tissue repair and regeneration, recapturing the remarkable repair capacity of juvenile animals."


Via Wildcat2030
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Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from A Tale of Two Medicines
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Which Fruits and Vegetables Reduce Bladder Cancer Risk

Which Fruits and Vegetables Reduce Bladder Cancer Risk | Health care | Scoop.it

A recent study suggests that a high intake of fruits and vegetables is associated with a lower risk of bladder cancer—but only in women.

 

The findings come from the Multiethnic Cohort Study, a longitudinal survey that, since 1996, has collected data on diet, lifestyle, and genetic factors from more than 215,000 adults between the ages of 45 and 75 in Hawaii and California and searched for links to cancer incidence. The study cohort includes African-Americans, Japanese-Americans, Latinos, Native Hawaiians, and whites.

 

Although prospective cohort studies found no relationship, past case-control studies have reported an inverse relationship between the incidence of bladder cancer and the intake of fruits and vegetables. 

 

These studies had been conducted in ethnically homogenous populations, primarily Europeans; therefore, the Multiethnic Cohort Study provided an opportunity to investigate the relationship in an ethnically diverse population.

 

This analysis drew on data from more than 185,000 participants in the study. Dietary data was collected on self-report questionnaires. Subjects were followed for 12.5 years, during which 581 cases of bladder cancer were recorded.


Via Jonathan Middleton
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Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Medicine in Pictures
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IT and the promise of Information-drive healthcare

IT and the promise of Information-drive healthcare | Health care | Scoop.it

Via Aditya Patkar
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Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Medicine in Pictures
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Imaging breast cancer with light

Imaging breast cancer with light | Health care | Scoop.it
Breast cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer and cancer deaths among women worldwide. Routine screening can increase breast cancer survival by detecting the disease early and allowing doctors to address it at this critical stage.

 

 

A schematic illustration of the imaging system and the ultrasound detector. (Credit: Wenfeng Xia, Biomedical Photonic Imaging group, University of Twente)

 

f effective, the new device, called a photoacoustic mammoscope, would represent an entirely new way of imaging the breast and detecting cancer. Instead of X-rays, which are used in traditional mammography, the photoacoustic breast mammoscope uses a combination of infrared light and ultrasound to create a 3-D map of the breast. The researchers describe their device in a paper published today in The Optical Society's (OSA) open-access journal Biomedical Optics Express.


Via Aditya Patkar
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The Awesome Growth of Social Media: 2013 Statistics

The Awesome Growth of Social Media: 2013 Statistics | Health care | Scoop.it
We are living in the digital era and social media is undoubtedly integrated to our daily life, so much so that, seeing this trend from a funny perspective, one can say that people check their pers (The awesome growth of social media: 2013 Stats
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Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from The Jazz of Innovation
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Diversity Is The Short Cut To Buidling An Innovative Culture. It Is Pretty Simple.

Diversity Is The Short Cut To Buidling An Innovative Culture. It Is Pretty Simple. | Health care | Scoop.it
Sometimes I wonder how much progress we’ve actually made over the last 50 years. In Saudi Arabia, women are still not allowed to drive along with many other things.

Via Peter Verschuere
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Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from Integrative Medicine
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Benefits of Meditation: 10 Science-Based Reasons To Start Meditating Today INFOGRAPHIC - Emma Seppala Ph.D.

Benefits of Meditation: 10 Science-Based Reasons To Start Meditating Today INFOGRAPHIC - Emma Seppala Ph.D. | Health care | Scoop.it
For the last 10 years, I have been involved in researching the impact of meditation on health and well-being. This infographic summarized some of the key findings about the benefits of meditation.

Via The BioSync Team, Dennis T OConnor
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The BioSync Team's curator insight, October 26, 2013 11:14 AM

What's not to LOVE ... Meditation gives you a BADASS BRAIN with increased WISDOM and PERSPECTIVE!


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Claudia Morcueto's curator insight, October 27, 2013 6:39 PM

Diez razones científicamente probadas para comenzar a meditar hoy mismo.

Ellen Naylor's curator insight, November 1, 2013 7:13 PM

I started meditating a few months ago. It's the best thing I have done for myself in years. It's incredibly calming and helps me focus on what's important.

Rescooped by Lisa Alvarado from The future of medicine and health
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Gluttony: Are We Addicted to Eating?: Scientific American

Gluttony: Are We Addicted to Eating?: Scientific American | Health care | Scoop.it
Humans who overeat may develop the same neural patterns as drug addicts do

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Eating for pleasure, rather than out of hunger, can prime our brain to want that hedonistic experience more and more.Humans who tend to overeat may develop the same patterns of neural activity in reward areas as drug addicts do; data suggest that eating high-sugar or high-fat diets can lead to cycles of craving and withdrawal.Although the concept of food addiction is controversial, lessons from recent research can put us on a fitter path. Regulating the amount of food choice we give ourselves, for example, and avoiding situations where we are conditioned to eat can help us consume less and feel better.


Via Wildcat2030
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Communicating to employees about health insurance open enrollment

Research indicates that 70% of employers have not communicated about health insurance open enrollment changes, despite the Oct. 1 deadline. Here's how.
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