Health
108 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Medinook from Analytics & Social media impact on Healthcare
Scoop.it!

The role of analytics in the evolving healthcare market

The role of analytics in the evolving healthcare market | Health | Scoop.it
With healthcare spending at about $3 trillion per year and accounting for nearly a fifth of gross domestic product (GDP), managing costs and improving outcomes are top priorities for healthcare providers, insurance companies and consumers alike.

 

KMWorldinterviewed five experts in the field, who offered insights into how business intelligence solutions can help organizations take on the challenge of a new and sometimes confusing environment.

Those interviewed by Judith Lamont, KMWorld senior writer, include John Carew, assistant VP, advanced analytics for Carolinas HealthCare System; Michael Corcoran, chief marketing officer, Information Builders; Graham Hughes, M.D., chief medical officer, Center for Health Analytics and Insights, SAS; Vi Shaffer, research VP at Gartner; and Alex White, managing director for corporate finance/restructuring, FTI Consulting.

Q Lamont: What are the most significant driving forces in healthcare today?

A Hughes: Multiple forces are putting pressure on the healthcare system, but the biggest change is the unstoppable shift from volume to value. Traditionally, revenue in the healthcare industry has been a function of the number of products and services provided. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is requiring a focus on outcomes—keeping patients healthy. This means that healthcare has to pivot and make some dramatic changes in its business model.

 

A Shaffer: Another major factor is the shift in demographics. We are dealing with the diseases of an aging population as the baby boomers hit 65 and above, as well as a range of chronic diseases. It requires a different continuum of care. We are seeing innovative changes in how healthcare is paid for and delivered. Providers have more incentives to keep patients healthy.

A White: The method of care is also shifting, with greater emphasis on outpatient care and the care continuum. These changes represent good opportunities for improving the quality of care because of the continuity across multiple settings, and also for cost savings—for example, by eliminating redundancy in diagnostics and treatment or identifying health risks earlier. That, combined with new technologies such as wireless sensors and mobile devices, means there is a tidal wave of data that people are struggling to capture and analyze from across a host of care settings.

Q Lamont: How are analytics solutions helping to address these issues?

A Hughes: Understanding individual risks as well as the risks within population is a data-driven exercise. Healthcare providers who are being rewarded for value will have to measure whether they are achieving the patient outcomes that are expected of them, and evaluate the extent to which they are proactively managing the risk of the patients they are taking accountability for.

A White: Multiple studies have shown that around a third of the nearly $3 trillion the United States spends on healthcare is wasted. As the paradigm shifts from volume- to value-based reimbursement, that means companies that are well positioned to identify and reduce inefficiencies should, in theory, be at an advantage. The bet that many are making is that analytics can help them do that—whether it's identifying unwarranted use of interventions, reducing fraud and abuse or managing care more effectively.

A Shaffer: Many of the innovations in treatment and reimbursement depend on technology for analytics, use of electronic records and monitoring seriously ill patients outside the hospital. More information is available about the patient, which allows better analysis of what approaches are most effective. Information is a strategic asset, and it must be infused rapidly to drive the clinical process, because there is a lot of downward pressure on costs now.

Q Lamont: From the viewpoint of a healthcare provider, how is your organization responding to these challenges?

A Carew: Carolinas HealthCare System is a non-profit healthcare system with 40 hospitals and 900 provider locations, as well as home healthcare, skilled nursing and hospice care. We are doing extensive analyses to measure quality of care across this continuum, evaluating outcomes and costs. We also need to understand which patients are at risk for developing severe or chronic illnesses, and try to avert those conditions.

Q Lamont: What is an example of an analysis that is being done right now in response to changes in healthcare regulations?

A Carew: We are looking very carefully at hospital readmissions, because that is one of the provisions of the ACA that has already been implemented. If a patient is readmitted within 30 days of a hospital stay, there is an impact on reimbursement. One of the strongest predictors of readmission is past utilization, so we monitor those statistics as well as other factors in ?the patient's environment, such as ?family support.

Q Lamont: What sort of interventions are you conducting in response to this information?

A Carew: When we identify a high-risk patient, we have several approaches. One is a program called TeachBack. This program assists with health literacy, meaning the ability of an individual to understand his or her condition and cope effectively with it. TeachBack explains the disease and how to take medication, and then the patient explains it back to the provider. We use this method because teaching is one of the most effective ways for someone to gain mastery of information.

A Hughes: It is important to address patient engagement head-on as part of multiyear population management strategy. For example, a 14-year-old diabetic does not interact with the healthcare system the same way as an acutely ill 70-year-old. Even though analytics-powered customer engagement approaches are common in other industries, its adoption in today's healthcare system is very immature, and only the pioneers are experimenting with these technologies.


Via Chatu Jayadewa
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from Healthcare in India
Scoop.it!

The rise of internet use and telehealth in India

The rise of internet use and telehealth in India | Health | Scoop.it

“Making geography history,” “making distance meaningless,” “a hospital in your pocket,” “cost effective, need based healthcare for everyone, anytime, anywhere,” are all hyperbole—fertile imagination working overtime and hype. But is it possible that in my lifetime I may actually see this happen? Improbable, yes. Impossible, no.

 

According to the Internet and Mobile Association of India, by June 2014 243 million people in India will have internet access, with 75 million of those living in rural India. India will be second only to China in terms internet use. 130 million people in India now access the internet via smart phones. 50% of urban internet users access the internet daily. So is healthcare via a phone possible in an “emerging economy?” Can this be the equivalent of buying a pizza or booking a ticket online?

 

 

Encounters between doctors and patients have always been face to face. I had serious concerns about whether India was ready to receive healthcare via a phone. From October 2012 to April 2013, 1866 individuals from five states were interviewed, 31% from rural areas. 22% from rural areas had smart phones (46% in urban). Surprisingly 48% in rural India and 72% in urban areas had heard of mobile health (mHealth). I would love to do a similar study in the UK or the US.

 

Perhaps it will clearly show that we are no longer following the West, not even piggy backing, but just leap frogging. In 2011, when I carried out a smaller study at a world renowned temple of technology in Chennai, the awareness of mHealth was dismally low.

 

The most reassuring finding now was that 55% of respondents (urban and rural) showed a very strong intent to use mobile phones for healthcare, if available. Mobile network operators in India should wake up to this. Their role in this will be much more than offering mobile TV—Tendulkar not withstanding.

 

 more at http://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2013/11/29/k-ganapathy-the-rise-of-internet-use-and-telehealth-in-india/
Via nrip
more...
Kenzie and Courtney's curator insight, October 29, 2014 4:21 PM

Social- 

This article shows how India is developing by using a more modern type of communicating. By having over 243 million people introduced to the internet by this year. They're becoming more social within themselves and with the world around them because they're now opened up to the world of technology.

Rescooped by Medinook from SELF HEALTH
Scoop.it!

Clean your Body's Drains: How to Detoxify your Lymphatic System

Clean your Body's Drains: How to Detoxify your Lymphatic System | Health | Scoop.it

"Did you know that we are exposed to 82,000 different toxins, chemically-based products and processed foods in our environment weekly?"

 

Detoxification is the body’s natural, ongoing process of eliminating harmful toxins from the body so that it can function at its best. Toxins are man-made chemicals found in the air, water, food, household cleaners and cosmetic products as well as waste products produced by normal cellular activity.

 

When toxins enter the body through the skin, nasal passage or mouth, the body prevents “pollution” by surrounding the toxins with fat and water and stores them in different areas of the body.  This can put a strain on our body’s own detox system (the liver, intestines, kidneys, lungs, skin, blood and lymphatic systems). These systems can become burdened as they try to safely excrete toxins.


Via PAT NOVAK
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from Healthcare Digital Marketing
Scoop.it!

Why government health departments are spending millions on mobile gaming

Why government health departments are spending millions on mobile gaming | Health | Scoop.it

Today sees the release of The Walk, an iOS and Android game backed by the UK's Department of Health. It's the second release in a collection of apps funded as part of the UK's Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI). The first -- StepJockey, an app that lets you map, locate, rate and log the calorific expenditure of staircases around your city -- came out on Monday. All five apps in the program encourage you to move more, or change negative habits. Can an app improve your life? At the very least, we're guessing the Department of Health -- having just spent £2 million on this round of investment -- thinks so. This is part of a growing trend, that could see government agencies in the UK taking a leaf out of Silicon Valley's book when it comes to solving (health) problems. Read past the break to find out why it's putting so much money on third-party digital initiatives.

Your mission is simple, ensure safe transit of a package from Inverness, to Edinburgh -- and in the process save the world. Only one problem: a terrorist attack has rendered all motorised transport unusable -- you'll have to go on foot. That's the premise behind The Walk. The concept isn't complicated -- encourage players to preambulate in the real world as part of an apocalyptic game narrative. Your phone's accelerometer tracks your movements, unlocking levels and hours of story-telling audio which drive the plot along. Simple, fun, effective. The game's predecessor (Zombies, Run!) uses similar mechanics, and currently encourages over 750,000 would-be Shauns (or Eds) to escape pursuing Zombies whenever they go for a jog. By lowering the requirement to walking, it's hoped almost everyone can benefit this time. The focus is on increasing general daily movement, rather than dedicated, prescribed and sometimes prohibitive training routines.


Via Marc Phippen
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Social Media Can Boost Disease Outbreak Monitoring, Study Finds

Social Media Can Boost Disease Outbreak Monitoring, Study Finds | Health | Scoop.it

Monitoring social media websites like Twitter could help health officials and providers identify in real time severe medical outbreaks, allowing them to more efficiently direct resources and curb the spread of disease, according to a San Diego State University studypublished last month in the Journal of Medical Internet Research,Medical News Today reports.

 

Study Details

 

For the study, lead researcher and San Diego State University geography professor Ming-Hsiang Tsou and his team used a program to monitor tweets that originated within a 17-mile radius of 11 cities. The program recorded details of tweets containing the words "flu" or "influenza," including:

 

Origin;Username;Whether the tweet was an original or a retweet; andAny links to websites in the tweet. 

 

Researchers then compared their findings with regional data based on CDC's definition of influenza-like illness.

  

The program recorded data on 161,821 tweets that included the word "flu" and 6,174 tweets that included the word "influenza" between June 2012 and the beginning of December 2012.

 

According to the study, nine of the 11 cities exhibited a statistically significant correlation between an uptick in the number of tweets mentioning the keywords and regional outbreak reports. In five of the cities -- Denver, Fort Worth, Jacksonville, San Diego and Seattle -- the algorithm noted the outbreaks sooner than regional reports.

 
Via nrip
more...
John Mark Bwanika's curator insight, December 7, 2013 5:13 AM

Research on social media......

Drew Hodges's curator insight, February 19, 2015 5:50 PM

This is a cool article to show the real life change that social media is creating. Before it was stated that it would take up to two weeks to detect an outbreak of a disease but now with social media it can be done in a day. 

This article really shows how social media is becoming a part of our everyday life and is taking on roles that we probably didn't expect it to. 

However with the number of users increasing it is important to have tools that help us monitor the large amount of data that is present. 

Its no good having all this information if we cannot harness it's true potential, like the one illustrated in this article for disease break out.

Rescooped by Medinook from Healthcare in India
Scoop.it!

The rise of internet use and telehealth in India

The rise of internet use and telehealth in India | Health | Scoop.it

“Making geography history,” “making distance meaningless,” “a hospital in your pocket,” “cost effective, need based healthcare for everyone, anytime, anywhere,” are all hyperbole—fertile imagination working overtime and hype. But is it possible that in my lifetime I may actually see this happen? Improbable, yes. Impossible, no.

 

According to the Internet and Mobile Association of India, by June 2014 243 million people in India will have internet access, with 75 million of those living in rural India. India will be second only to China in terms internet use. 130 million people in India now access the internet via smart phones. 50% of urban internet users access the internet daily. So is healthcare via a phone possible in an “emerging economy?” Can this be the equivalent of buying a pizza or booking a ticket online?

 

 

Encounters between doctors and patients have always been face to face. I had serious concerns about whether India was ready to receive healthcare via a phone. From October 2012 to April 2013, 1866 individuals from five states were interviewed, 31% from rural areas. 22% from rural areas had smart phones (46% in urban). Surprisingly 48% in rural India and 72% in urban areas had heard of mobile health (mHealth). I would love to do a similar study in the UK or the US.

 

Perhaps it will clearly show that we are no longer following the West, not even piggy backing, but just leap frogging. In 2011, when I carried out a smaller study at a world renowned temple of technology in Chennai, the awareness of mHealth was dismally low.

 

The most reassuring finding now was that 55% of respondents (urban and rural) showed a very strong intent to use mobile phones for healthcare, if available. Mobile network operators in India should wake up to this. Their role in this will be much more than offering mobile TV—Tendulkar not withstanding.

 

 more at http://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2013/11/29/k-ganapathy-the-rise-of-internet-use-and-telehealth-in-india/
Via nrip
more...
Kenzie and Courtney's curator insight, October 29, 2014 4:21 PM

Social- 

This article shows how India is developing by using a more modern type of communicating. By having over 243 million people introduced to the internet by this year. They're becoming more social within themselves and with the world around them because they're now opened up to the world of technology.

Rescooped by Medinook from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Living With Diabetes: How I Use Social Media to Connect With Other Patients

Living With Diabetes: How I Use Social Media to Connect With Other Patients | Health | Scoop.it

Emotions. It’s not something that comes to mind when you think of someone living with diabetes. But believe it or not, there are many profound feelings and emotions involved with diabetes management.

So often, diabetes is about a number. The number that corresponds to a fingerstick. The number you get every three months at the endocrinologist’s office. The number of times you’ve checked your blood sugar. The number of times you gave yourself a bolus of insulin. The number of carbohydrates in that snack you just had.

 

It’s exhausting. Trying to function as your own pancreas is flat out difficult. And because of both the stigma surrounding this disease and the nature ofHIPPA laws, it can be downright lonely sometimes. Even when you’ve got the most supportive family and friends and a terrific team of doctors, it feels like a battle that can only be fought and understood by you.

 

While others can see how sweaty and shaky low blood sugar makes you, they can’t feel the haze that comes along with it. While others can observe your reaction to a blood sugar check, they don’t feel the guiltfrom forgetting to bolus, or not bolusing enough, or bolusing too much. There is opportunity for much doubt and fear, and it can be easy to fall prey to.

 

I have a super weapon for dealing with some of the negative emotions I feel about diabetes. It’s called the Diabetic Online Community (DOC).

I discovered the DOC through Twitter, and quite accidentally. Now, I interact with other People with Diabetes all over the world across many social media platforms including, but not limited to, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Vine. I’ve connected with people diagnosed in early adulthood, like myself. I’ve talked to people who use an insulin pump and Continuous Glucose Monitor just like me. I’ve talked to people who are disappointed sometimes in all those numbers, just like me.

 

I’ve met many not like me as well. People who manage their diabetes with injections. People living withType 2 diabetes. People who are parents, caring for their children who live with diabetes. I’ve met people who challenged my thoughts, feelings and knowledge of this disease. People who cheered with me when my hard work paid off and others who reassured me when I was having a bad day.

 

I urge you to read some of the blogs written by some of the most popular DOC members. I’ve linked to some in this post already (Kerry, Lorraine and Alexis) but there are so many more diabetes bloggers out there. Some of my other favorites are George, Scott, Kim, Ginger, another Scott and this collection of Diabetes Bloggers at Diabetes Mine.

 

I’ve gained much since I found the DOC: A wealth of a knowledge I can turn to when I encounter a new situation. A camaraderie that I can depend on to rally with me. A kinship with people who just “get it.” I’ve even found a few real life friendships with people who live in the area. I don’t know where my diabetes management would be without the DOC. But I hope I never have to find out


Via Plus91
more...
Tambre Leighn's curator insight, December 1, 2013 7:16 PM

Chronic illnesses such as diabetes and cardiac care have done and continue to do a great job in approaching rehabilitation.  Here's another example of how developing a community of support can make a difference in quality of life.  The more we can take models that work in other chronic illnesses and apply them in survivorship the faster we can get survivorship programs rolled out and in a way that works for survivors...not just what others THINK will work.

Rescooped by Medinook from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
Scoop.it!

How To Motivate Yourself Into an Exercise Routine You'll Actually Stick To

How To Motivate Yourself Into an Exercise Routine You'll Actually Stick To | Health | Scoop.it
If getting active and staying healthy were easy, everyone would do it...but we don't. We come home after a long day of sitting in a chair to de-stress by sitting in another chair, unable to summon the energy to take a walk or hit the gym.

Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from Health Supreme
Scoop.it!

Turmeric extract Curcumin was found 100% effective at preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Turmeric extract Curcumin was found 100% effective at preventing Type 2 Diabetes | Health | Scoop.it

A remarkable human clinical study published in the journal Diabetes Care, the journal of the American Diabetes Association, revealed that turmeric extract was 100% successful at preventing prediabetic patients from becoming diabetic over the course of a 9-month intervention.

 

Performed by Thailand researchers, the study's primary object was to assess the efficacy of curcumin, the primary polyphenol in turmeric which gives the spice its golden hue, in delaying the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a prediabetic population...


Via Sepp Hasslberger
more...
Arun Shrivastava's curator insight, November 23, 2013 10:10 AM

Quod Erat Demonstarndum

Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:31 AM

Curcumin was founTurmeric d 100% effective at preventing Type 2 Diabeteextract s

Rescooped by Medinook from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Using Health Information Technology to Engage Patients in their Care

Using Health Information Technology to Engage Patients in their Care | Health | Scoop.it

Patient engagement, defined as the process of placing patients at the center and in control of their own healthcare, is becoming a chief healthcare priority


Concurrently, a number of national information infrastructure initiatives are targeting increased patient engagement and the design of health information systems that improve the availability of health information and integrate it in meaningful ways for patients.  So far, these technology goals have been advanced primarily through the design of personal health records (PHRs), patient portals, electronic health records (EHRs), and health information exchanges (HIEs).  However, we remain far from achieving the goal of truly engaging patients in their care.


Generation and exchange of health data with patients is a requirement for Stage 3 EHR meaningful use incentives. Patients are entitled to an electronically generated copy of the record of their encounters with providers. 

 

Sharing provider-generated data with patients is expected to promote patient engagement and accountability, but our own experiences suggest that the data that are being shared are currently a mixed blessing.  For example, one encounter report took the form of a 6-page document in which the vast majority of information was copied and pasted from previous encounters and in which there were several factual errors. The errors will be discussed with the provider during the next visit.

 

Certainly the report got our attention; whether empowerment will result remains an open question.  On another occasion, although the visit itself had included making decisions about future treatment, the plan was not mentioned in the document, leaving the patient to rely on her own memory and notes.

 The National eHealth Collaborative Technical Expert Panel recommends fully integrating patient-generated data (e.g., home monitoring of daily weights, blood glucose, or blood pressure readings) into the clinical workflow of healthcare providers

Although patients want this type of involvement, we have only begun to address their wishes and concerns.  In the next sections, we summarize the current status of several potential building blocks to achieving patient engagement goals and emphasize the role of the nurse informaticist as fundamental to the process.

 

more at the original : http://ojni.org/issues/?p=2848

 



Via nrip
more...
Brandi Carney's curator insight, January 23, 2014 6:20 PM

This site helps to encourage patients to be more aware of their health by using different pieces of technology.

Rescooped by Medinook from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

British surgeons to use 3D printing to reconstruct a man's FACE

British surgeons to use 3D printing to reconstruct a man's FACE | Health | Scoop.it
Surgeons in Swansea, South Wales, have used CT scans to create detailed three-dimensional images which will be used to create the printed implants.

 

Cutting edge 3D printing technology is being used to recreate the severely injured face of a road accident victim. A team of British surgeons are poised to carry out a pioneering operation, which will restore the symmetry of a man’s face, using new parts produced by a printer. The unaffected side of the biker’s face has been used to create a mirror image, which will enable perfect facial reconstruction.

  


Computer images are being used to create titanium implants using Additive Manufacturing, which commonly known as 3D printing.


The images are used both to design guides to cut and position facial bones with pinpoint accuracy and create tailor-made implants for the patient.


The guides and implants are being produced in medical-grade titanium in Belgium, at one of the world’s few specialist 3D printing facilities.


Surgeons in Swansea, south Wales, used an X-ray CT scan to create minutely detailed three-dimensional images to design the bespoke implants. 


The work is considered so groundbreaking and radical it already features in an exhibition at London’s Science Museum, even before the operation itself has been carried out.

 

 

more at : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2506038/3D-printing-used-reconstruct-mans-FACE.html


Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
Scoop.it!

6 Amazing Reasons to Sleep for Skin Health - Skin and Beauty Center - Everyday Health

6 Amazing Reasons to Sleep for Skin Health - Skin and Beauty Center - Everyday Health | Health | Scoop.it
A good nights sleep is good for skin health. Learn how lack of sleep can rob skin of its natural glow and worsen health conditions that affect your skin.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from Healthcare Digital Marketing
Scoop.it!

Scientists develop at-home 3D video game for stroke patients

Scientists develop at-home 3D video game for stroke patients | Health | Scoop.it

The game helps stroke survivors overcome their motor weakness.

 

Washington: Scientists have developed a therapeutic at-home 3D gaming programme to help stroke patients overcome motor weakness, which affects 80 per cent of survivors.

Hemiparesis is defined as weakness or the inability to move one side of the body, and can be debilitating as it impacts everyday functions such as eating, dressing or grabbing objects, said researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

Constraint-induced movement therapy (CI therapy) is an intense treatment recommended for stroke survivors, and improves motor function, as well as the use of impaired upper extremities.

However, less than 1 per cent of those affected by hemiparesis receives the beneficial therapy. "Lack of access, transportation and cost are contributing barriers to receiving CI therapy. To address this disparity, our team developed a 3D gaming system to deliver CI therapy to patients in their homes," said Lynne Gauthier, assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation in Ohio State's College of Medicine.

Gauthier, also principal investigator of the study and a neuroscientist, is collaborating with a multi-disciplinary team comprised of clinicians, computer scientists, an electrical engineer and a biomechanist to design an innovative video game incorporating effective ingredients CI therapy.


Via Marc Phippen
more...
Annemieke Lenselink's curator insight, November 12, 2013 4:53 AM

Hope it will be available soon for a wide audience

Rescooped by Medinook from Pharmabook
Scoop.it!

Top HIT trends for 2014: Accelerated change is coming | Healthcare IT News

Top HIT trends for 2014: Accelerated change is coming | Healthcare IT News | Health | Scoop.it

Via Philippe Loizon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from Healthcare in India
Scoop.it!

Docs use WhatsApp to save heart patients

Docs use WhatsApp to save heart patients | Health | Scoop.it

Doctors at KEM Hospital have turned to the most ubiquitous personal technology - the smartphone - to speed up diagnosis of patients with suspected heart complications. 

They have started using the popular smartphone messenger 'WhatsApp' to send pictures of patients' electrocardiograms (ECG) to each other for a quick review, saving time spent on reaching the emergency ward and checking the actual report. 

The approach enables them to begin the treatment of a person who has suffered a heart attack within the crucial golden hour, the period when emergency care is most likely to be successful. Delay in proper diagnosis and treatment during this period results in amajority of cardiac fatalities. 

In fact, over 60 per cent of patients who have suffered a heart attack reach the hospital way beyond the golden hour, the average being about five hours. So every moment they spend waiting for the doctor to arrive and study their ECG increases the risks. 

"The moment a patient walks in here complaining of chest pain or any other related problem, a specialist takes out an ECG and sends the image to the doctors on hand," said Dr Prafulla Kerkar, head of KEM's cardiology department. "We, in fact, have a WhatsApp group where the experts in our department are signed in." 

 

more at http://www.mumbaimirror.com/mumbai/others/Docs-use-WhatsApp-to-save-heart-patients/articleshow/27252815.cms


Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

72% of Consumers Are Willing To See A Doctor Via Telehealth Video Conferencing

72% of Consumers Are Willing To See A Doctor Via Telehealth Video Conferencing | Health | Scoop.it

72% of consumers across the eight countries are willing to see a doctor via telehealth video conferencing for non-urgent appointments, according to Intel survey.

 

The study, “Intel Healthcare Innovation Barometer” was conducted across eight countries by Penn Schoen Berland in Brazil, China, France, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan and the United States from July 28 to Aug. 15, 2013 among a representative sample of 12,000 adults ages 18 and older.

 The findings concludes that most people are optimistic about technology innovations advancing healthcare, are open to sharing healthcare information for the greater good and receptive to using sensors for personalized care.
As the technology of remote patient monitoring solutions and mobile health applications improve, consumers now have the ability to connect with their providers in a variety of ways to embrace new behaviors

Other key findings of the Intel Healthcare Innovation Barometer include:

 

Improving Personal Care and Self-Monitoring with Technology

Sixty-six percent of people say they would prefer a personalized healthcare regimen designed specifically for them based on their genetic profile or biology.Fifty-three percent of people say they would trust a test they personally administered as much or more than if performed by a doctor. 

Sharing Anonymous Digital Health Records for the Common Good

People are more willing to anonymously share their health records or genetic information than their banking information or phone records.More than three-quarters (76 percent) of respondents over the age of 55 would be willing to anonymously share results of lab tests or health monitoring to contribute to research databases compared with 64 percent of millennials.India is the country most willing to share healthcare information to aid innovation. 

Emerging Technology Tools for Increased In-Home Health Management

Half of those surveyed would trust a diagnosis delivered via video conference from their doctor.Seventy-two percent are receptive to communication technologies that allow them to remotely connect to their doctor.The innovation least likely to be incorporated by the global population is a robot performing surgery.Almost half of respondents (43 percent) globally would trust themselves to monitor their own blood pressure and other basic vitals.

more at http://www.hitconsultant.net/2013/12/11/72-of-consumers-are-willing-to-see-a-doctor-via-telehealth-video-conferencing/
Via nrip
more...
Donovan Baldwin's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:16 AM

We have seen this in sci-fi for years, and now it's coming true. Are you in? Would this be something YOU would go along with?

Rescooped by Medinook from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social media Healthcare: Why .... and how

The Regina Lectures - Nov 28 2. Lecture to Regina child psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers

Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from SELF HEALTH
Scoop.it!

What the Color of Your Pee Says About Your Health

What the Color of Your Pee Says About Your Health | Health | Scoop.it
It's not something you might think about often, but your pee can tell you a lot about your body. This graphic from Cleveland Clinic shows what different urine hues might say about your health.

 

In particular, pee color—which ranges from completely clear to golden and even weirder colors like blue or green—can tell you if you're hydrated enough. It's useful to know that if you don't see any color you might be drinking too much water, while the darker yellow and amber colors are signs to go fill your water glass.

 


Via PAT NOVAK
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from Digital Health
Scoop.it!

Digital doctors: how mobile apps are changing healthcare - Telegraph

Digital doctors: how mobile apps are changing healthcare - Telegraph | Health | Scoop.it
Mobile apps that enable doctors to quickly reference medical research are paving the way for a digital revolution in healthcare

Via Alex Butler
more...
Rescooped by Medinook from Healthcare in India
Scoop.it!

Privatising public healthcare in India, one report at a time

Privatising public healthcare in India, one report at a time | Health | Scoop.it

Public health experts and activists are attacking a proposal by India's leading government think tank that recommends handing many of the country's healthcare responsibilities to the private sector.

 

The document, written by India's Planning Commission, proposes eliminating the government as the primary healthcare provider. Instead, it would focus on specific areas such as immunisation and HIV testing. Getting rid of many of its other responsibilities would amount to a shortcut to its goal of universal healthcare. Patients would get private healthcare at a cost that the government would negotiate with the private sector, and service providers could be reimbursed for each medical prescription.

 

The proposal, which is similar to the managed care system in the United States, caused such a ruckus that some of the major parties who contributed to the plan have distanced themselves from it. Members of the High Level Expert Group set up by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, say that the commission has distorted their recommendations.

 

"Planning Commissions' document calls for a 'managed healthcare' approach where the role of the government is reduced from a provider to that of a manager," said Rakhal Gaitonde, a public health researcher and state coordinator for the government's National Rural Health Mission in Tamil Nadu.

 more at: http://in.reuters.com/article/2012/08/19/public-healthcare-india-idINDEE87I05420120819

 


Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from Digital Health
Scoop.it!

24 Outstanding Statistics on How Social Media has Impacted Health Care

24 Outstanding Statistics on How Social Media has Impacted Health Care | Health | Scoop.it
Communication has been disrupted through social media but how has the health care industry faired? Dive into an analysis of 24 statistics on the subject.

Via Alex Butler
more...
Cathy's curator insight, November 23, 2013 10:47 PM

Social media does great changes in XXI

Dr Martin Wale's curator insight, December 3, 2013 1:08 AM

American perspective, but some interesting stuff.

 

Rescooped by Medinook from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
Scoop.it!

Yoga: why men don't get it

Yoga: why men don't get it | Health | Scoop.it
Despite its benefits, the poses and the chanting can be too much of a stretch for some males.

Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social media - can it help patient communications

Social media - can it help patient communications | Health | Scoop.it

Over the last while, there is an increasing use of social media by healthcare organisations to communicate with patients and families.  I wanted to highlight three separate cases which demonstrate a wide variety of use with practical benefits. The other important trend is the inclusion of assessing the degree of online access a patient has to their information into Government schemes such as in the United States. More about that below.

 

Turning to our e-advisors

When reviewing different aspects of their services, why not involve your customers in giving feedback -  a recommended approach. With social media, there are more options in addition to the traditional face-to-face customer focus groups. One example is the use of the "virtual advisory council" by Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Children's Hospital in Delaware to provide advice on new patient procedures including appointments scheduling or simplifying patient information leaflets. 

One interesting aspect of this communication by Nemours Children's hospital is that the recruitment for the advisory council is managed by public social media sources such as Twitter, with the actual feedback is managed by a private social network. There are other examples where healthcare organisations use solely public social media - for example, University of Michigan Health System's online engagement with their patients and families comprises up to 35 online surveys a year and the use of a Facebook page to enable a teen council respond to questions.

Given the busy lifestyles of patients and families, using social media makes a lot of sense - a 24/7 service that enables healthcare organisations to widen their net for feedback and comment.  

 

Tracking what people say
The use of social media to engage directly with patients and families is one online option, but can we track what people are saying about a healthcare organisation in the social media sphere. That's what the 'Insights' - a beta service launched by the NHS - is seeking to achieve by tracking sentiment and online commentary about the NHS and its services. There is also a 'specific' page for Patients and staff which displays information on top complaints and the key customer service question - 'Would you recommend the NHS to others? 

This service is planned to formally launch in November 2013 and in a paper to the NHS England board, Tim Kelsey listed the key objectives behind the service was to provide "...a never before seen view of experiences and views about the NHS from patients, the public and NHS staff..." And what about patient information
Some hospitals and medical practices are starting to put patient information online; either in a view-only mode or to enable patients update their records with any relevant comments. This may not be regarded as traditional social media, but it is an important feature in any online patient engagement. 

One interesting case study in providing online medical information to patients involves Cleveland Clinic and their open medical records policy. For Cleveland Clinic, providing online medical record information to patients was part of a patient engagement strategy which started with services such as online scheduling and patient education. 

Their open medical records policy started with providing lab test results to patients since October 2012 and evolving since then to include viewing and updating doctor's notes. Currently, there are a number of pilots enabling patients to update their records with reported outcomes after the completion of a treatment. 

Measuring Patient Engagement
These three case studies show the evolution of online patient engagement and the role that social media services contribute to this engagement. As a measure of the evolution, healthcare organisations are now assessed on their online patient engagement. 

One example of this is the Patient Engagement Index, which is part of the Meaningful Use assessment in the US as part of the roll-out of Electronic Health Records. Part of the Meaningful Use assessment includes assessing that more than half of patients receive 'timely' summaries of their clinician visits. 

By including online patient information access in the assessments of healthcare organisations, it provides a tangible objective to achieve.

The above examples are just a sample of the progress being made with online medical information access, I would welcome hearing about other examples and online experiences.   
Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Medinook from SELF HEALTH
Scoop.it!

A Simple Breathing Exercise for a Balanced Mind

A Simple Breathing Exercise for a Balanced Mind | Health | Scoop.it

Pranayama, or the yoga of breathing, is often described so esoterically that non-yogis have a hard time embracing the practice. Personally, I was intimidated by pranayama even after years of practicing yoga asana (poses). But the benefits of pranayama are tremendous, and there are several breathing exercises anyone can incorporate in just a few minutes a day.


Via PAT NOVAK
more...
Sara Picken-Brown's curator insight, December 5, 2013 5:35 PM

@sealfit #teachesbreathcontrol #toolformentalstrengthconditioning #stressmanagement #physicalaccomplishment #beingpresent #situationalwaareness

Rescooped by Medinook from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Four trends that will shape future advances in healthcare

Four trends that will shape future advances in healthcare | Health | Scoop.it

This year's Center for Connected Health Symposium, presented by the Boston-based Partners HealthCare system, aimed to place today's healthcare challenges in the context of the innovations that will drive change. Here are four trends that will shape future advances in healthcare — and what will catalyze these and other advances in years to come.

 

1. Data Analytics: Improved Population Health Management

 

Analytics, to no one's surprise, ranks highly among healthcare innovations with the most untapped potential. Big data use cases for healthcare continue to emerge, but many organizations remained mired in more traditional analytics practices. In these instances, it can take months to conduct an analysis, says Michael Greeley, founder and general partner with Flybridge Capital Partners; by then, the "window to intervene" has long since shut.

 

2 . Telestroke: Improving Stroke Diagnosis, Treatment and Recovery

 

Like analytics, telestroke seems poised to move from pilot phase to sustainability.

A need certainly exists. More than 40 percent of the nation's hospitals have fewer than 100 beds, says Dr. David Hess, chairman of the Georgia Regents University Department of Neurology, and therefore have little choice but to transfer stroke patients to facilities with more comprehensive stroke centers. But most of those small hospitals are in remote areas, and moving a patient is literally a life-or-death decision.

 

3. Healthcare at Home: The Patient-Centered Medical Home

 

While the so-called patient-centered medical home is largely absent from the Affordable Care Act, the principles of healthcare reform and the accountable care model nonetheless present an opportunity to demonstrate the value of telemedicine and mobile health. The key task is reducing hospital readmissions — which is part of healthcare reform, so much so that hospitals with "excess" readmissions within 30 days face reduced reimbursements.

 

4. Emotional Sensing: Understanding How Patients Feel

 

Skydiving brings similar physiological effects to all comers, says Meghan Searl, a research psychologist with the Center for Connected Health — an increased heart rate, a shortness of breath and, well, the feeling that one's dropping from the sky. Some find it exhilarating; others, downright frightening.

 

What Will Drive Future Healthcare IT Innovation?

 

So what will drive emotional sensing, analytics, home healthcare, telestroke technology and otherhealthcare IT innovations? Connected Health Symposium speakers offered these prognostications.

 

Sensors. Saxon has used sensors to help athletes pinpoint cardiovascular tendencies and military personnel identify who experiences the least stress. She also says she sees potential in automobile sensors, which are already plentiful and could be augmented to, say, monitor a driver's blood pressure using sensors in the steering wheel. External sensors, in particular, are prime for growth, Firlik adds: "As soon as we don't invade the body, we have a lower regulatory barrier."

 

Social media. YouTube is the most popular "TV network" among 18-34 year olds, Saxon points out, and works well as an educational platform for, say, sharing recipes and diet tips for young diabetes patients. Meanwhile, Saxon's everyheartbeat.org encourages people to post a photo of their heart rate to Instagram, simultaneously offering "another window of experience" for the photo-sharing site and providing an easy-to-access data set.

 

Scale. True solutions will need to span hospital departments and lines of business, says Dr. Scott Howell, senior vice president of clinical affairs for Cardinal Health Specialty Solutions. They'll also need to be integrated, which will mean cooperating with pharmacies, acute care facilities, nursing homes and other affiliates and business partners.

 

Startups. Large tech firms such as Google are hiring chief innovation officers. To Greeley, this signals two things: That they recognize that data drives healthcare and that they represent potential co-investors for early-stage investment.
Via nrip
more...