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Chemists create battery technology with off-the-charts charging capacity

Chemists create battery technology with off-the-charts charging capacity | Health & Science | Scoop.it
University of California, Irvine researchers have invented nanowire-based battery material that can be recharged hundreds of thousands of times, moving us closer to a battery that would never require replacement. The breakthroug
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Altice Eyes Cablevision Deal Close in Second Quarter, Plans No Further U.S. Purchases in 2016

Altice Eyes Cablevision Deal Close in Second Quarter, Plans No Further U.S. Purchases in 2016 | Health & Science | Scoop.it
European cable and telecom giant Altice expects to close the acquisition of Cablevision Systems in the second quarter and likes the momentum it has seen early on at fellow U.S. cable operator Suddenlink, in which it bought a 70 percent stake in a $9.1 billion deal late last year, management said Tuesday.
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Modified form of CRISPR allows scientists to silence genes rather than deleting them - Factor

Modified form of CRISPR allows scientists to silence genes rather than deleting them - Factor | Health & Science | Scoop.it
Scientists have modified the CRISPR-Cas9 system so they have the flexibility to undo gene edits and carefully control the amount of gene suppression.
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'Smallest SoC for IoT' Adds Memory | EE Times

'Smallest SoC for IoT' Adds Memory | EE Times | Health & Science | Scoop.it
Freescale's new i.MX 6D SoC is called a Single Chip System Module, (SCM) because it also has a 1-gigaByte Micron low-power double data rate chip stacked on top of three Freescale die for its dual ARM Cortex-A9 cores, power management chip and 16 megaByte of serial peripheral interface NOR flash nonvolatile memory.
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Understanding Patients' Needs with Social Media Analytics

Understanding Patients' Needs with Social Media Analytics | Health & Science | Scoop.it

Among the 50 largest drug makers in the world, more than half still aren’t actively using social media to engage healthcare consumers or patients. Most of them primarily use social media as a broadcasting channel, and no more than 10 are on Twitter, Facebook or YouTube.

Even with drug makers’ recent increases in digital spending, the pharmaceutical industry is repeatedly said to be a laggard in adoption of social media.

Drugmakers’ common excuse for remaining social media wallflowers is largely due to the regulatory uncertainty and the doubts on how to measure social ROI.

 

1/ The rise of the empowered patient

With the role of social media rapidly expanding, patients are increasingly turning to popular social networks, such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, blogs and forums obtaining and sharing information related to their health.

In the US, for example, over one third of consumers manage their own health and are using social media to help them make important healthcare decisions.

The consequent empowerment of the patient in making decisions around their treatment has led them to be more aware and have a greater say in the treatment process.

But it’s not just patients who go to social media to voice their opinions. The pharma industry has multiple stakeholders who actively research and discuss online, including patients, physicians, payers, caregivers, providers and advocacy groups.

 

This trend only heightens the imperative need for pharmaceutical companies and regulators to take notice and contribute to the overall healthcare discussion, particularly to the appropriate use of medicines.

But how do you actually know what physicians are saying about your drug?
Can you identify your patients’ primary concerns about your market leading product?

What are the conversation themes around managing the disease?
How does the online reputation of your brand compare to competitors?
Are patients switching brands and if so, why?

2/ Using social media as a research tool

The most immediate benefit that social media has to offer pharmaceutical companies is as a research tool.

The answers to the questions above require a more proactive embrace of social media analytics tools by pharmaceutical manufacturers.

Social media analytics tools, such as Brandwatch Analytics, can mine not only Twitter but also public forums, blogs, news sites, Facebook and other social networks to uncover patients and physicians’ sentiments and opinions.

One of our clients, Creation Healthcare, did exactly such a thing not too long ago. They indexed half a million healthcare professional profiles across thousands of sites using Brandwatch Analytics to understand how treatments and products are perceived by those who may prescribe them every day.

The online market research consultancy was able to spot healthcare trends and concerns months before others did. Offering unrivaled insight into the views of healthcare professionals, Creation Healthcare’s research business attracted six times more clients than before.

Identifying the opinions of healthcare professionals and patients is, indeed, a complicated process, particularly because of the amount of noise and spam surrounding pharmaceuticals. With boolean operators and rules, you can filter out spammy websites and irrelevant views.

 

3/ Using social media to foster discussions with your stakeholders

Understanding the kind of people who make up the conversation in your niche can prove far more insightful than listening only to those who mention your product or brand.

In a recent report we analyzed thousands of mentions online using social media analyticsto understand people’s attitude towards HIV treatment and to inform targeted messaging.

Their target audience is often seen as being the healthcare professional. But when analyzing all HIV discussion on social media, it turns out it’s the patients, caregivers and those that actually aren’t directly affected by HIV who offer the most powerful insights.

 

The general public spoke nearly three times more about HIV treatment than healthcare professionals, suggesting a general interest in the topic and that online influencers may differ from offline.

Diving deeper into this data, we noticed that the different stakeholders are chatting about HIV in entirely different places.

Data like this could dramatically impact how a drug manufacturer develops its communication strategies and targets its messaging.

4/ Building tailored marketing strategies

As shown below, social media analytics can be applied at various stages of a drug lifecycle; right from your drug discovery stage (understanding unmet needs) to the launch (improving your brand messaging) to the maturity stage (monitoring brand reputation and intimately connecting patients and physicians).

Insights generated during each stage can be utilized across all departments in your company.

 

If you’re still analyzing the conversation about your own brand or products, then now is the time to rethink your social media activities.

While social media is not a panacea, it provides an arguably underused opportunity across the business to research, understand and boost discussions with all healthcare consumers.

There’s no such thing as having a remarkable drug without having tailored strategies to appeal to your own target audience.

Forget the mass market, segment and evaluate healthcare conversations by the different stakeholders. Find out what they are talking about online and how your organization can fit into that.

 


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Pascal Kerhervé's curator insight, July 29, 2015 9:39 AM

Social media has a rising role in collecting insights to understand the patients' unmet needs or to improve your brand messaging, are you using it?

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Metal Fillings No More: Lasers Used to Rebuild Teeth - NBC News

Metal Fillings No More: Lasers Used to Rebuild Teeth - NBC News | Health & Science | Scoop.it
Working with a team of researchers at the Harvard Wyss Institute, Doctor Praveen Arany has found a way to coax stem cells into the production of dentin, a ma...
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Global genome study offers schizophrenia breakthrough (Wired UK)

Global genome study offers schizophrenia breakthrough (Wired UK) | Health & Science | Scoop.it
Schizophrenia research has had a massive boost this week, with 108 relevant genetic locations identified in a global genome study
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The First Man-Made Biological Leaf Turns Light and Water Into Oxygen

The First Man-Made Biological Leaf Turns Light and Water Into Oxygen | Health & Science | Scoop.it
If humanity hopes to realize its dreams of exploring the stars, we're going to need to find ways to recreate life on Earth aboard a spaceship. Simply stockpiling enough vital supplies isn't going to cut it, which is what led Julian Melchiorri, a student at the Royal College of Art, to create an artificial biological leaf that produces oxygen just like the ones on our home planet do.
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Bioprinted blood vessels pave way to organs-on-demand (Wired UK)

Bioprinted blood vessels pave way to organs-on-demand (Wired UK) | Health & Science | Scoop.it
New research has led to the bioprinting of artificial vascular networks that mimic those found within the human body's circulatory system, bringing hope that eventually physicians will be able to print fully working organs on demand
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Scientists smash barrier to growing organs from stem cells

Scientists smash barrier to growing organs from stem cells | Health & Science | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Scientists at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have overcome one of the greatest challenges in biology and taken a major step toward being able to grow whole organs and tissues from stem cells. By manipulating the appropriate signaling, the U.Va. researchers have turned embryonic ...
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Tomatoes, cinnamon, avocados: Make the most of nature's medicine cabinet

Tomatoes, cinnamon, avocados: Make the most of nature's medicine cabinet | Health & Science | Scoop.it
DON'T let insect bites, sunburn, nausea and an upset tummy ruin your annual break. These 10 natural healers will ensure a happy and healthy holiday.
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Computer guided surgery tightens knee replacements

Computer guided surgery tightens knee replacements | Health & Science | Scoop.it
A new technology designed to make an increasingly common knee surgery even more effective is already changing lives at one Bay Area hospital.
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Not waiting for Google, an Indonesian startup has its own Project Loon

Not waiting for Google, an Indonesian startup has its own Project Loon | Health & Science | Scoop.it
Helion is like a low-tech version of Project Loon, using tethered balloons. The goal is the same: deliver internet to remote areas at low cost.
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Rescooped by G Nuno Monteiro from Pharma Biotech Industry Review (Krishan Maggon)
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CRISPR: gene editing is just the beginning

CRISPR: gene editing is just the beginning | Health & Science | Scoop.it

The real power of the biological tool lies in exploring how genomes work.


Much of the conversation about CRISPR–Cas9 has revolved around its potential for treating disease or editing the genes of human embryos, but researchers say that the real revolution right now is in the lab. What CRISPR offers, and biologists desire, is specificity: the ability to target and study particular DNA sequences in the vast expanse of a genome. And editing DNA is just one trick that it can be used for. Scientists are hacking the tools so that they can send proteins to precise DNA targets to toggle genes on or off, and even engineer entire biological circuits — with the long-term goal of understanding cellular systems and disease.


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NATURE | NEWS FEATURE Sharing
Nature 531, 156–159 (10 March 2016) doi:10.1038/531156a
CRISPR: gene editing is just the beginning
The real power of the biological tool lies in exploring how genomes work.
Heidi Ledford
07 March 2016
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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, March 10, 2:09 AM
NATURE | NEWS FEATURE Sharing
Nature 531, 156–159 (10 March 2016) doi:10.1038/531156a
CRISPR: gene editing is just the beginning
The real power of the biological tool lies in exploring how genomes work.
Heidi Ledford
07 March 2016
Rescooped by G Nuno Monteiro from Iris Scans and Biometrics
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Why the Time Has Not Yet Come for Biometrics?

Winfrasoft CEO, Steven Hope explains why the time has not yet come for Biometrics, as he joined leading privacy, identity and security experts from across ...

Via Kenneth Carnesi,JD
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GSMA Appreciates Adoption of the Connected Continent Regulation, Looks to Move on to More Pressing Rule Changes | Newsroom

GSMA Appreciates Adoption of the Connected Continent Regulation, Looks to Move on to More Pressing Rule Changes | Newsroom | Health & Science | Scoop.it
More Needs To Be Done To Drive Growth of Europe’s Digital Economy 30 June 2015, Brussels: The GSMA appreciates the efforts of the Council of the European Union and European Parliament in conc...
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Why Millennials Don't Want To Buy Stuff

Why Millennials Don't Want To Buy Stuff | Health & Science | Scoop.it
Help connect people to other people through your business. Sales isn't really about "selling" anymore, it's about building
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Complex Bread Wheat Genome Cracked | Nat Geo Food

Complex Bread Wheat Genome Cracked | Nat Geo Food | Health & Science | Scoop.it
The mapping methods for wheat, which contains a staggering 100,000 genes, were unusually labor intensive.
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Johnson & Johnson partners with Organovo to consider 3D-printing living tissue

Johnson & Johnson partners with Organovo to consider 3D-printing living tissue | Health & Science | Scoop.it
The partnership centers around using bioprinted tissue to discover new drugs. The announcement comes ahead of Organovo’s commercial launch later this year.
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First Glimpse of Higgs Bosons at Work Revealed

First Glimpse of Higgs Bosons at Work Revealed | Health & Science | Scoop.it
The Higgs Boson was spotted in an ultra-rare interaction between force-carrying particles called W-Bosons, which could explain how the Higgs boson imparts mass to other particles.
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End of chemotherapy within 20 years as pioneering DNA project launched - Telegraph

End of chemotherapy within 20 years as pioneering DNA project launched - Telegraph | Health & Science | Scoop.it
Cancer patients will no longer have to put up with the debilitating side-effects of chemotherapy after David Cameron launched a new landmark project to map the genetic causes of disease
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Energy breakthrough uses sun to create solar energy materials

Energy breakthrough uses sun to create solar energy materials | Health & Science | Scoop.it
In a recent advance in solar energy, researchers have discovered a way to tap the sun not only as a source of power, but also to directly produce the solar energy materials that make this possible.
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IBM's Watson joins 'genomic medicine' effort

IBM's Watson joins 'genomic medicine' effort | Health & Science | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON - IBM said Wednesday it was joining a "genomic medicine" initiative, using its Watson supercomputer to deliver customized treatment options for cancer patients.
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