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Is This Menopause? How To Tell

Is This Menopause? How To Tell | Health Articles | Scoop.it

Menopause is a completely normal and natural state of life to reach, but we don't like to talk about it. That's probably because women are so often tarred with the 'crazy hormone lady' brush. You've probably heard someone say 'don't mind her, she's on the blob', 'Or jeez, early menopause?' Our hormones often get the blame for our actions, which makes many women reluctant to discuss the changes they are experiencing for fear of being branded irrational and out of control. 

 

At What Age Will Menopause Strike?

 

It's commonly believed that menopause affects women in their 50s, but actually the symptoms can kick in much earlier. You don't just get the menopause on your 50th as some sort of crap gift. The average age is 52, but you can be in your 30s or 60s when it appears. Every woman is different.

 

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2025: The Future Of Health - YouTube

http://www.healthexpress.co.uk/blog/general-health/ehealth.html - HealthExpress.co.uk reveals what your daily routine will look like in 2025. How do you thin...
HealthExpress.co.uk's insight:

What will your daily routine look like in 2025? How do you think eHealth will affect our lives? Visit the link above to get the opinions of industry experts.

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5 Ways Social Media Saved Someone's Life

5 Ways Social Media Saved Someone's Life | Health Articles | Scoop.it

I was chugging coffee, trying to meet a deadline before my children got home from school, when I felt a strange sensation: My left eyelid began twitching uncontrollably, fluttering as rapidly as a butterfly's wings.

Great! I thought. The last thing I had time for at that moment was a trip to the doctor. Instead, I typed a quick Facebook post: "My eyelid keeps twitching uncontrollably. Is that bad?"

Within minutes, several mom friends informed me that this had happened to them, too, and that doctors had diagnosed it as a symptom of stress. Well, that made sense. I made a mental note to see a doctor if it continued for long, but went on with my work, and once my deadline went away, so did the twitching.

My story is not nearly as dramatic as those whose social networks helped point them toward life-saving diagnoses. But it illustrates a valuable point: The power of social networks to help us manage our health is much bigger than the occasional life-and-death story. Whether it's on Facebook, Reddit or any other platform, social media can be a valuable reality check to help us figure out when we or our children need medical attention, and when we need to just calm down and get on with things.

The dramatic stories, though, are much more fun to read about. Enjoy these tales of ordinary people whose lives were saved when strangers or friends online let them know they needed intervention. Nearly every one was a tear jerker for me.

1. Kawasaki Disease

Doctors thought Deborah Kogan's 4-year-old son, Leo, had a strep infection, but when hisface swelled to "Nutty Professor" proportions, Kogan was puzzled. Within 10 minutes of posting a photo of the sick child on Facebook, Kogan received a phone call from a contact, urging her to rush the boy to the hospital. The Facebook friend's son had had a rare autoimmune disorder called Kawasaki Disease, and she was convinced that Leo had the same thing.

Kogan was tempted to ignore this warning and stay home — until two doctors in her social network contacted her with the same thought.

At the hospital, Leo was diagnosed with Kawasaki Disease, and although he suffered liver and heart damage, his life was spared.

2. Mastoiditis

An Australian mother looked to a mother's Facebook group for help identifying a red lump on her toddler's head. The photo the woman, identified only as Kerry, posted did not look alarming — just a little swelling behind the ear. Yet, her friends urged her to take 21-month-old Gracie to the hospital immediately. Some group members had correctly pegged the swelling as mastoiditis, an infection that can lead to hearing loss, meningitis or even a brain abscess.

At the hospital, Gracie had surgery, with doctors drilling into her skull to relieve swelling pressure. She made a full recovery.

3. Retinoblastoma

On the other side of the world, another toddler named Grace was also saved when her picture was posted on Facebook — but this time, her parents didn't even know she was sick. Michele Freeman uploaded an everyday snapshot of her daughter, and a friend who happens to be a pediatric nurse noticed something odd about the child's eyes: One reflected red light, as is common in flash photos, while the other eye looked white.

Warned by her friend, Freeman had her daughter examined, and Grace was diagnosed with retinoblastoma, a form of cancer. She lost her vision in the affected eye, but the cancer was treated before it could spread.

4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Mary Evelyn knew her son would have spina bifida before he was born. She joined some online groups for parents of such children, thinking that this would help her family adjust. Little did she know, her new online community would help save her child's life.

After bringing the baby home from the hospital, Evelyn noticed that he took long pauses between breaths while he slept. Her pediatrician said it was normal, but she was not convinced.

So Evelyn posted about the issue online, and was urged to take a video to show medical professionals. She did, and the video got the baby admitted to the hospital, where he was later diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea and eventually needed a tracheotomy.

"An online community of strangers saved my baby's life," Evelyn writes on her blog. Now, she tells other families whose children are diagnosed with SB: "Find your community."

5. Testicular Cancer

The preceding stories show that moms are very active online when it comes to their kids' health, but not all stories of social diagnosis are about small children. In fact, last year, a college student ended up getting lifesaving cancer surgery because he looked at a photo on Reddit that was labeled as "gross."

The photo was posted by someone who had recently had a testical removed due to cancer. Taylor "Chase" Tyree, a computer science major at the Colorado School of Mines, realized he had the same symptoms that the poster described. Four days later, he was in surgery.

"I can tell my friends, 'Reddit saved my life!'" Tyree posted after the procedure, along with a photo of himself in his hospital gown, thumbs up.

It's important to note that all of these stories led the parents and patients to consult real doctors; it would be a terrible idea to rely entirely on the opinions of online friends to make diagnoses. Still, the common thread in all these stories is that the parents or patients would not have seen a doctor at that time, had they not been pushed to do so by their online networks.

In the future, social media as a health resource might not be limited to advice from human connections. Researchers are experimenting with analyzing Twitter feeds for hints that the people behind them might be suffering from disorders, including postpartum depression. Others are using social media to track infectious disease outbreaks.

Today, your social media connections might realize you are sick before you do. In the future, it could be the social network itself, or an app on the network, that suggests you get that lump checked out.

 


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Why Are Young Men Experiencing ED?

Why Are Young Men Experiencing ED? | Health Articles | Scoop.it
Why are more young men experiencing ED? One possible reason is lifestyle factors. Smoking, stress from jobs or relationships, depression and other health conditions such as diabetes or neurological issues can all have an impact.
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How Can We Get More Women Into Sport?

How Can We Get More Women Into Sport? | Health Articles | Scoop.it
Talking about women in sport can lead to a whole load of issues - from involvement to judgement.
HealthExpress.co.uk's insight:

This Girl Can aims to combat the fear of judgment that Sport England found to be the chief reason for women not competing or taking part in sport.

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Social media – part of the routine

Social media – part of the routine | Health Articles | Scoop.it

Social media and digital health are evolving at an incredible rate. According to Pew Research, seven out of 10 adult internet users search online for information about health, around a quarter of people who use social media follow their friends' personal health experiences and 15 per cent use social networks for health information.

So how is pharma responding to this evolution? A recent report by the IMS Institute found nearly half of the top 50 pharmaceutical companies actively participate in social media, but many are using it to simply broadcast messages and have limited interaction or engagement with patients and clinicians.

Standing back and not having a clear social media engagement strategy could mean that these companies miss out on the benefits of social media. Not only does social media help to build corporate reputation and employee engagement, it provides an opportunity to interact with followers and the wider community and this can have long-term strategic and commercial benefits.

Pharma companies point to regulation (or lack thereof) and compliance issues as key barriers, while marketers have doubts about how to measure the return-on-investment (ROI) for such initiatives. However, not all pharma companies are holding back; some are pioneers in social media activity and are using the platforms to their advantage. A report published earlier this year by Ogilvy Healthworld named Boehringer Ingelheim, GSK and Johnson & Johnson as 'social media butterflies', meaning they are active on many social platforms and highly engaged with their audiences. 

Boehringer Ingelheim was the most active out of the 14 companies surveyed and, in May last year, they hosted the first disease-related tweet chat. #ChatAFib, in line with the 2013 European Stroke Congress. It generated an estimated 720,900 impressions and 305 tweets from 76 participants and gained widespread recognition in the pharma industry as a game-changing activity. The project won the Excellence in Digital Communications award at the recent Communiqué Awards.

The GSK Facebook page is another worthy example of how a pharma company is leading the way on social media. Launched in January 2011, the page has over 107,000 likes and brings GSK closer to key audiences by providing a variety of relevant content that is closely aligned to the business objectives. A separate tab labelled 'Welcome' gives information about how GSK operates on Facebook in a warm tone that is easy to understand. GSK also replies, where necessary, to comments from their followers. 

A clear vision
So how can pharma companies do social media well and follow the lead of these companies? From my time managing a digital content team at Bupa and my previous experience as a digital content manager, I believe it is important that you begin with a clear vision for your social media engagement. This should be aligned with your business objectives to ensure that everything you do on social has a purpose. 

Another important aspect of social media strategy is to ensure that you have a clear workflow and approval process for all content, with a simple way to track and monitor any changes to your content. If you have a lot of content to put through review then a simple spreadsheet with approval status of each piece of content is useful. It is also important that you are flexible and can change your content calendar when required.

Finally, monitor what is happening both on your social channels and the wider community. Hootsuite and TweetDeck are useful tools to help you manage all your social media channels. You can schedule all of your content, measure what is happening through the analytics tools and monitor your channels and wider trends on social media. Be prepared for negative feedback and make sure you have a review process in place with key stakeholders for when it happens. 

Without a shadow of a doubt, social media is changing the way patients and healthcare professionals interact with each other and gain access to information. The pharmaceutical industry is beginning to embrace social media and the future is an exciting one as more and more companies grow and evolve with it. I believe that we will see a shift in the way pharma companies interact with patients and healthcare professionals.

There will a move from pushing out content that generates awareness, to providing patients and healthcare professionals with information that creates conversations and empowered brand advocates. The pharma companies that succeed will be those who keep on top of this fast-paced digital era and are not afraid to experiment with new digital trends.

 


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Get body-prepped for spring

Get body-prepped for spring | Health Articles | Scoop.it
Lose those extra pounds before spring and summer arrive. Here's how.... All the latest news and expert advice on dieting and diet plans.
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Smartwatches will revolutionise treatment for chronic conditions

Smartwatches will revolutionise treatment for chronic conditions | Health Articles | Scoop.it
Google, Apple, and Samsung are racing to develop wearable technology that could be used to to monitor and track personal health and diagnose disease, explains Chris Duffey

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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, July 28, 2014 10:43 AM

¿Se convertirán estos dispositivos de cuantificación en tecnologías de acercamiento? Aún les queda mucho camino por recorrer, aunque seguro que vemos cosas interesantes

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Ask The Doctor with Dr Christian Jessen 2014

Ask The Doctor with Dr Christian Jessen 2014 | Health Articles | Scoop.it

Digital Edition of Ask The Doctor publication from At Home Magazine.

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Could An Asthma Action Plan Save Your Life?

Could An Asthma Action Plan Save Your Life? | Health Articles | Scoop.it
If you have asthma it can be daunting trying to work out which medicines to take, as well as when and how to take them. Having an action plan can help you stay on top of your symptoms so you can avoid a potentially dangerous asthma attack.
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How Diabetes Can Affect Your Sex Life

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Sex Life | Health Articles | Scoop.it
Diabetes can have a number of side effects, including on your sex life. Take a look at our list to get some ideas on how to prevent problems.
HealthExpress.co.uk's insight:

As many as 50% of men and 25% of women can experience sexual problems as a result of diabetes.

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Dr Hilary Answers Your Questions: Part IV

Dr Hilary Answers Your Questions: Part IV | Health Articles | Scoop.it

January is typically a month where people like to focus on their health so, Dr. Hilary was flooded with lots of common health questions. Take a look.

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Does Quitting Alcohol For A Month Really Benefit Your Health?

Does Quitting Alcohol For A Month Really Benefit Your Health? | Health Articles | Scoop.it
Why take part in Dry January? And is it good for you?
HealthExpress.co.uk's insight:

 The campaign slogan – save money-lose weight-feel energised – certainly hints at a better standard of living, and with all of the money raised through donations and sponsorships going to Alcohol Concern, the campaign really does carry a positive message.

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Five Top Tips For Fighting Fatigue

Five Top Tips For Fighting Fatigue | Health Articles | Scoop.it
There are various reasons as to why you might be feeling fatigued. The good news is that there are steps you can take to feel energized again.
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Phone Consultations Are Increasing GP workloads

Phone Consultations Are Increasing GP workloads | Health Articles | Scoop.it
Phone Consultations Are Increasing GP workloads. New blog from Health Express
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It was hoped that using shorter phone consultations would reduce some of the burden on GPs, but the British Medical Association (BMA) said, “doctors might be falling under more pressure from surging patient demands.”

 
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Mobile Technologies Could Revolutionize Health Care If It Can Overcome Challenges | MIT Technology Review

Mobile Technologies Could Revolutionize Health Care If It Can Overcome Challenges | MIT Technology Review | Health Articles | Scoop.it

Among technologists, mobile health is thriving. Since the start of 2013, more than $750 million in venture capital has been invested in companies that do everything from turn your smartphone into a blood pressure gauge to snapping medical–quality images of the inner ear. Apple, Qualcomm, Microsoft, and other corporate giants are creating mobile health products and investing in startups. 


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Why Have Complaints About Doctors Doubled In The Last 5 Years?

Why Have Complaints About Doctors Doubled In The Last 5 Years? | Health Articles | Scoop.it

With the rise of smartphones and tablets, it’s easier than ever before to join online communities, discuss treatments and complain.

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Father’s day checklist

Father’s day checklist | Health Articles | Scoop.it
When it comes to their health dads deserve more attention than just one day in June Gail Shortland examines all the check-ups we should encourage them to have and why
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