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Help yourself with trendy fashion clothing -Men's Fashion Tips

Help yourself with trendy fashion clothing -Men's Fashion Tips | Health and wellness | Scoop.it
Men's Fashion Tips! Personal Style Statement for Necessary Fashion Clothing.What do you mean by essential fashion clothing?
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Rescooped by Kimberly Bassett-Ficklin from Doctor
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Six criteria to measure the reliability of health information on the Internet

Six criteria to measure the reliability of health information on the Internet | Health and wellness | Scoop.it

Dr. Cox writes:

 

nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/evaluatinghealthinformation.html which includes a tutorial on accessing and evaluating information on the web. There are some questions you should ask yourself any time you evaluate a site:

 

1. Who sponsors the website? Going to a trusted organization is a good way to access good reliable information such as the federal government (nih.gov), an academic institution (Dartmouth University), or a nationally recognized society (American Cancer Society).

 

2. Who wrote the information? Does the site have an editorial board or a panel of experts who wrote and reviewed the information? Does it reference other national sites or recently published peer reviewed articles in well-known medical journals or site obscure references and individuals' experiences?

 

3. Is the information recent? The time medical information is relevant shortens daily, make sure you check several up-to-date sites.

 

4. Does the site have a privacy policy? Be wary of any site that asks you for personal information or wants to sign you up for regular mailings. Who will they share your information with? Perhaps companies selling products for this condition?

 

5. The site makes claims that seem too good to be true; chances they are? Be sure to check several sites. Seeing confirming information on several trusted sites should give you comfort that the information you are seeing is probably reliable.

 

6. Make sure to check information with your physician. Chances are your physician might be able to direct you to reliable sites for information on specific conditions. They will also help you sort through the information you obtain to make sense of it for you.

 


Via Andrew Spong
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Pere Florensa's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:16 AM

1. ¿Quienes son los sponsors? ¿son fiables¿, ¿son instituciones?

2. ¿Quien la escribe?

3. ¿Es reciente?

4. ¿la Web tiene política de privacidad?

5. ¿La web da informaciones demasiado buenas para ser verdad? , ¿es sensacionalista?

6. Enséñasela a tu médico, es quien tiene el criterio necesario para saber si es fiable o no

Rescooped by Kimberly Bassett-Ficklin from Michael Pingree's Facebook Report
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7 Social Media Mistakes that Can Keep Your Content from Going Viral

7 Social Media Mistakes that Can Keep Your Content from Going Viral | Health and wellness | Scoop.it
Tweet Tweet Social media marketing may not be rocket science, but there is still a large science component to it. If you want your content to spread, you have to look at the numbers and stop making gut decisions.
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Rescooped by Kimberly Bassett-Ficklin from Health and wellness
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Six criteria to measure the reliability of health information on the Internet

Six criteria to measure the reliability of health information on the Internet | Health and wellness | Scoop.it

Dr. Cox writes:

 

nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/evaluatinghealthinformation.html which includes a tutorial on accessing and evaluating information on the web. There are some questions you should ask yourself any time you evaluate a site:

 

1. Who sponsors the website? Going to a trusted organization is a good way to access good reliable information such as the federal government (nih.gov), an academic institution (Dartmouth University), or a nationally recognized society (American Cancer Society).

 

2. Who wrote the information? Does the site have an editorial board or a panel of experts who wrote and reviewed the information? Does it reference other national sites or recently published peer reviewed articles in well-known medical journals or site obscure references and individuals' experiences?

 

3. Is the information recent? The time medical information is relevant shortens daily, make sure you check several up-to-date sites.

 

4. Does the site have a privacy policy? Be wary of any site that asks you for personal information or wants to sign you up for regular mailings. Who will they share your information with? Perhaps companies selling products for this condition?

 

5. The site makes claims that seem too good to be true; chances they are? Be sure to check several sites. Seeing confirming information on several trusted sites should give you comfort that the information you are seeing is probably reliable.

 

6. Make sure to check information with your physician. Chances are your physician might be able to direct you to reliable sites for information on specific conditions. They will also help you sort through the information you obtain to make sense of it for you.

 


Via Andrew Spong, Kimberly Bassett-Ficklin
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Pere Florensa's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:16 AM

1. ¿Quienes son los sponsors? ¿son fiables¿, ¿son instituciones?

2. ¿Quien la escribe?

3. ¿Es reciente?

4. ¿la Web tiene política de privacidad?

5. ¿La web da informaciones demasiado buenas para ser verdad? , ¿es sensacionalista?

6. Enséñasela a tu médico, es quien tiene el criterio necesario para saber si es fiable o no

Rescooped by Kimberly Bassett-Ficklin from The Miracle of Fall
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Mass. Lobsterman Finds Halloween-Themed Catch

Mass. Lobsterman Finds Halloween-Themed Catch | Health and wellness | Scoop.it

Aquarium officials says the odds of a "split" orange-and-black lobster is one in 50 million...

 

CBS News


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