Health and Biomedical Informatics
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Health and Biomedical Informatics
News and views on Biomedical Informatics and eHealth"
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Medical Informatics 2.0

Medical Informatics 2.0 | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
Informatics 2.0 is the title of an editorial in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA).

Via Paul Aneja - eTrends
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'Single Gene May Hold Key to Life Itself'

'Single Gene May Hold Key to Life Itself' | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
Distortions and sensationalism really only explain how deterministic stories persist -- not why. There must be something satisfying and lucrative about "gene-for" stories. What is so sexy about a gene for IQ?
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Providers of Genomics Software

Providers of Genomics Software | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
Is there room for 90 providers of genomics software? The market won't support such a high number of companies eventually, but will for now.
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Diagnosing Skin Cancer via iPhone: The Apps to Know

Diagnosing Skin Cancer via iPhone: The Apps to Know | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it

Are you keeping an eye on your moles? Really, though? In light of the shortage of dermatologists, a market has developed to augment DIY monitoring of skin anomalies of all sorts. Instagram filters not recommended.

 

Forty-two percent of Americans live in areas that are "underserved by dermatologists," according to a set of recent and oft-cited journal studies. Long lines for Botox? Hardly. With all the cosmetics hoopla, it can be easy to forget that dermatology is most often serious business. Skin cancer, for instance, is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. When caught early, it's also entirely treatable.

Here's where things get interesting: Yes, people get a lot of moles, and moles tend to make people very nervous (with reason!). Yet in truth, while it's important to closely monitor your moles, most really are benign.

 

It takes just minutes for a good doctor to do a check, but compare that to the one to four months the average American currently has to wait to get an appointment. Moles aren't the only dermatologic condition that's simple to diagnose, either. Acne has a high cure rate, given just a handful of data points. Rosacea, eczema... the list goes on.

 

What this translates to is a massive market of conditions so easy to diagnose that they possess relatively low liability, a fact that's putting dermatology at the forefront of some extremely impressive mobile and telemedicine technology.

 

"Mobile dermatology solutions can help solve the problem of access, and that's fueling a lot of funding," says Unity Stoakes, co-founder of the Manhattan-based StartUp Health, an acceleration academy for health and wellness entrepreneurs. "Anyone with a smartphone has access to affordable apps, built-in diagnostic devices, and thereby the ability to connect with specialists who can help them monitor and check their skin."


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Smartphone = Smarter Healthcare | Websalute, e-santé, e-health, #hcsmeuit

Smartphone = Smarter Healthcare | Websalute, e-santé, e-health, #hcsmeuit | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it

mHealth is becoming more popular as people are starting to use mobile phones to download health apps. Take a look at this Infographic to learn more about the rapid rise of mobile health management tools.


Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Tracking your body with technology - CNN

Tracking your body with technology - CNN | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
Tracking your body with technologyCNNAs of Thursday, there were 873 people registered for the Quantified Self message boards, where people discuss the latest apps and research.
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A report on the Medicine 2.0 conference in Boston - Experientia

A report on the Medicine 2.0 conference in Boston - Experientia | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
Report by Experientia researcher Anna Wojnarowska. Harvard Medical School hosted this weekend the Medicine 2.0 conference in Boston. The fifth edition of the event invited academics, practitioners and clinicians for two ...
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Vanderbilt University to offer free courses online through Coursera ...

Vanderbilt University to offer free courses online through Coursera ... | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
... associate professor of biomedical informatics and director of the Office of Research Information;; Innovation Strategy: Managing Innovation and Creativity in Individuals, Groups, and Organizations, taught by David Owens, ...
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The Future of Health Care: Using the Internet to Deliver Health Interventions - Huffington Post (blog)

The Future of Health Care: Using the Internet to Deliver Health Interventions - Huffington Post (blog) | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
The Future of Health Care: Using the Internet to Deliver Health InterventionsHuffington Post (blog)This is not a small problem -- and the consequences, from both individual and public health perspectives, are huge.
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Conference Notebook: Data from Quantified Self 2012 | BrandFiller

Conference Notebook: Data from Quantified Self 2012 | BrandFiller | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
Last weekend I attended the 2012 Quantified Self conference in Palo Alto, a gathering of “self-trackers”: people who collect data about themselves and conduct their own experiments (where n almost always equals 1).
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Envisioning the future of health technology

Envisioning the future of health technology | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it

Technology is the ultimate democratizing force in society. Over time, technology raises lowest common denominators by reducing costs and connecting people across the world. Medical technology is no exception to this trend: previously siloed repositories of information and expensive diagnostic methods are rapidly finding a global reach and enabling both patients and practitioners to make better use of information.

This visualization is an exercise in speculating about which individual technologies are likely to affect the scenario of health in the coming decades. Arranged in six broad areas, the forecast covers a multitude of research and developments that are likely to disrupt the future of healthcare.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Giovanna Marsico, Giuseppe Fattori, fjms
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The Path to Personalized Medicine — NEJM

Perspective from The New England Journal of Medicine — The Path to Personalized Medicine...
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PLOS Computational Biology: An Online Bioinformatics Curriculum

PLOS Computational Biology: An Online Bioinformatics Curriculum | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
PLOS Computational Biology is an open-access (An online #bioinformatics curriculum. Yes/no? What do you think?
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The Doctor's Tech Toolbox - the changing landscape of Health IT

The Doctor's Tech Toolbox - the changing landscape of Health IT | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it

Last few years have seen acceleration in adoption of health IT systems. Below is a fantastic infographic from OBizMedia showing how information technology is changing the way medical information is gathering, accessed, reported, shared, and analyzed. 


Via Paul Aneja - eTrends
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HIS2013

HIS2013 | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it

The 2nd International Conference on Health Information Science (HIS 2013) aims to integrate computer science/information technology with health sciences & services, embracing information science research coupled with topics related to the modeling, design, development, integration, and management of health information systems. HIS 2013 will be held on 26-27 March 2013 in London, UK.

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E-health is no cure-all - swissinfo.ch

E-health is no cure-all - swissinfo.ch | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
swissinfo.chE-health is no cure-allswissinfo.chE-health covers all electronic processes involved in medicine, including electronic patient files, telemedicine, consumer health informatics, virtual healthcare teams and mobile devices to collect and...
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Health InfoScape

Health InfoScape | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
When you have heartburn, do you also feel nauseous? Or if you're experiencing insomnia, do you tend to put on a few pounds, or more?
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Recap of eAJKD's coverage of the Medicine 2.0 (2012) conference –

Recap of eAJKD's coverage of the Medicine 2.0 (2012) conference – | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
Recap of eAJKD's coverage of the Medicine 2.0 (2012) conference. September 20, 2012 By eajkd Leave a Comment. Check out all of the coverage of this year's Medicine 2.0 conference by eAJKD's Joel Topf below: The Opening · YouTube ...
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SMART apps in the EHR --- this is progress!

SMART apps in the EHR --- this is progress! | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it

Last week I had the opportunity to visit my old hometown while attending the SMART conference at Harvard Medical School (and as a bonus I got to catch up with my dad at the super-yummy Publick House in Brighton). I always have high expectations of the Ken and Zac show, but this one was even more notable than most. It was a bit of a sequel to the 2009 ITdotHealth conference that built on their NEJM article about “substitutable apps” --- since then they’ve received a SHARP grant to make their ideas into something akin to reality, and frankly have done a ton of cool stuff.

 

The concrete manifestation of this research is the evolving SMART platform --- an open source environment that creates an abstraction between “containers” (data sources like an EHR or clinical data warehouse) and “apps” (bits of end-user functionality) --- so that they can be mixed-and-matched at will, without additional integration or customization (for those of us keeping score, more evidence that every computer science problem is a normalization problem).

 

The clearest way to get a sense of the benefit here is to check out the Blood Pressure Centiles app that is actually deployed and being used in production at Boston Children’s. Determining “normal” for a child’s BP requires some math, incorporating age, gender, height, weight, etc. as inputs. Not rocket science, but also a somewhat specialized function that has been on the “to do” list for the EHR for years and never quite made the priority list. By conceiving this as a SMART app, they were able to “inject” the functionality directly into the EHR without any custom development. And to drive the point home, we saw the same app running without modification on an i2b2 data warehouse, the MIRTH results HIE client, and maybe another one I can’t remember. Pretty sweet.


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23andMe gives API access to your genetic data - Wired.co.uk

23andMe gives API access to your genetic data - Wired.co.uk | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
Wired.co.uk23andMe gives API access to your genetic dataWired.co.ukAnnounced at the Quantified Self Conference in California, this adds a whole new dimension to a movement that until now has largely revolved around relatively rudimentary tech like...
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Health Informatics in the Cloud with Mark Braunstein

The course Health Informatics in the Cloud by Mark Braunstein from Georgia Institute of Technology will be offered free of charge to everyone on ...youtube.com...
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Why Health Care Needs Social Media

Why Health Care Needs Social Media | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
Relationships are crucial to health. We know that people with more and stronger social connections are more likely to be well and happy, and social media can bolster that.
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Informatics approach helps doctors, patients make sense of genome data - HealthCanal.com

Informatics approach helps doctors, patients make sense of genome data - HealthCanal.com | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
Informatics approach helps doctors, patients make sense of genome dataHealthCanal.comThe team then created an informatics approach to carry out a structured analysis on these three 'bins'.
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Patient Engagement Is A Physician-Patient Communication Challenge…Not A Health Information Technology Challenge

Patient Engagement Is A Physician-Patient Communication Challenge…Not A Health Information Technology Challenge | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it

Physicians, hospitals and other providers are being misled by  industry pundits claiming that more health information technology (as in EMRs, PHRs, Smart Phone apps, and web portals) is the key to greater patient engagement.   It’s not.

 

If health information technology were all that was needed to “engage” patients then patient and member adoption rates of provider and payer web portals offering Personal Health Records (PHRs) and Electronic Health Records (EHRs) would not still be hovering around a disappointing 7% (with several notable exceptions Kaiser, Group Health and the VA).*

 

Part of the misunderstanding concerning the role of HIT comes from how the discussion about about patient engagement is being framed. According to the pundits, patient engagement is the physician or hospital’s responsibility… and like everything else these days…we can fix it if we just throw more technology at the problem. Can anyone say Stage 2 Meaningful Use requirements?


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Common Examples of Healthcare IT Failure

Common Examples of Healthcare IT Failure | Health and Biomedical Informatics | Scoop.it
@petctimaging In theory. The current reality is somewhat different.
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