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Heal Or Die: Bad Foods?
Foods that have been reported to cause health problems.
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10 Weird and Gross Ingredients in Processed Food

10 Weird and Gross Ingredients in Processed Food | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
Everyone now knows that processed and fast foods are not the bastions of nutrition, but that shouldn’t make these ingredients found inside them any less revolting. Check out these top 10 weird ingredients...

 

 

Fertilizers – in your bread

While chemical fertilizers inevitably make it into our produce in trace amounts, you would not expect it to be a common food additive. However, ammonium sulfate can be found inside many brands of bread, including Subway’s. The chemical provides nitrogen for the yeast, creating a more consistent product.

 

 

Beaver Anal Glands – in your candy

The anal glands of a beaver, conveniently euphemized as castoreum, are a common ingredient in perfumes and colognes but are also sometimes used to — believe it or not — enhance the flavor of raspberry candies and sweets.

 

 

Beef Fat – in your snacks

While this may not bother the most ardent omnivore, others are shocked to discover that their favorite childhood treats contain straight-up beef fat. The ingredient comes included a list of other oils that may or may not be used, so it is always a gamble!

 

 

Crushed Bugs – as red food coloring

After killing thousands at a time, the dried insects are boiled to produce a liquid solution that can be turned to a dye using a variety of treatments. Some people worry that the coloring — often called carmine or carminic acid — could be listed as a “natural color,” disguising the fact that there are bugs in the product.

 

 

Beetle Juice – the hard candy coating

You know that shiny coating on candies like Skittles? Or the sprinkles on cupcakes and ice cream sundaes? Well, they get that glaze from the secretions of the female lac beetle. The substance is also known as shellac and commonly used as a wood varnish.

 

 

Sheep Secretions – in your bubble gum

The oils inside sheep’s wool are collected to create the goopy substance called lanolin. From there, it ends up in chewing gum (sometimes under the guise of “gum base”), but also is used to create vitamin D3 supplements.



Human Hair and Duck Feathers – in your bread

What’s in your morning bagel? If you get it from Noah’s Bagels, it contains either human hair or duck feathers, and it’s your guess as to which. The substance, called L-cysteine or cystine, is used as a dough conditioner to produce a specific consistency. While artificial cysteine is available, it is cost prohibitive and mostly used to create kosher and halal products.

 

 

Coal Tar – in red colored candy

Coal tar is listed as number 199 on the United Nations list of “dangerous goods,” but that doesn’t stop people from using it in food. The coloring Allura Red AC is derived from coal tar and is commonly found in red-colored candies, sodas and other sweets.

 

 

Calf Stomach – in your cheese

In the UK, all cheeses are labeled as either suitable or not suitable for vegetarians because in Britain — and everywhere else — many cheeses are made using rennet, which is the fourth stomach of a young cow. In the United States and most other countries, people are left to guess about the stomach-content of their cheese.

 

 

Sand – in your chili

Sand is hidden in Wendy’s chili as a name you might remember from high school chemistry class: silicon dioxide. Apparently they use sand as an “anti-caking agent,” perhaps to make sure the chili can last for days and days over a heater.

 

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Eating for a Healthy Heart

Eating for a Healthy Heart | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
StrongerTogether.coop is a place for people to gather on their food journeys. It’s a place to find out more about what’s in your food, where it comes from, where to find great food, how to prepare it, and a whole lot more.
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Fats in Your Food: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

Fats in Your Food: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
Everyone hates fats, right? We go to great lengths to avoid them. But cutting fats completely is actually bad for our health. From Unjunk Your Junk Food by Andrea Donsky and Randy Boyer.
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McNuggets: A Sodium Death Trap? by Sylvia Anderson - Heart - InsidersHealth.com

McNuggets: A Sodium Death Trap? by Sylvia Anderson - Heart - InsidersHealth.com | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it

So how does your body react from all those sodium high fast foods? Read about what happened to 17 year old whose diet for the last 15 years consisted of McDonalds Chicken McNuggets.


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'Breast cancer drug causes bone loss' - Times of India

'Breast cancer drug causes bone loss' - Times of India | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
The West Australian'Breast cancer drug causes bone loss'Times of IndiaA commonly used drug exemestane taken by early breast cancer patients in India - as frequently as once a day for five years - has been found to cause significant bone loss, even...
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FDA questions Amgen drug for prostate cancer - USA TODAY

FDA questions Amgen drug for prostate cancer - USA TODAY | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
USA TODAYFDA questions Amgen drug for prostate cancerUSA TODAYWASHINGTON – Scientists for the Food and Drug Administration say that an Amgen drug slowed the spread of cancer to the bone in men with hard-to-treat prostate cancer, though the drug did...
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Frying foods in olive, sunflower oils may not be bad for your heart

Frying foods in olive, sunflower oils may not be bad for your heart | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
Rejoice, those who love fried foods: eating them may not put you at higher risk for coronary heart disease --if you're frying those foods in olive or sunflower oils.
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10 Surprisingly Healthy Packaged Foods

10 Surprisingly Healthy Packaged Foods | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
You can feel good about buying some boxed, canned and jarred items when you're equipped with the right information. Understanding what you're looking for is the first step to healthy choices within the supermarket aisles.
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Foods to beat the winter blues - Fox News

Foods to beat the winter blues - Fox News | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
Foods to beat the winter bluesFox NewsYou may reach for calorie-laden comfort foods to boost your spirits, but in the end the weather is still bad and you feel overstuffed.
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A cup of yerba mate tea helps to destroy human colon cancer cells say scientists

A cup of yerba mate tea helps to destroy human colon cancer cells say scientists | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it

In the Sacramento and Davis regional area, scientists at UC Davis study the health effects and benefits of drinking Yerba mate tea. Scientists at another university now have found that yerba mate tea helps to destroy human colon cancer cells. Check out the latest study on molecular nutrition and food research scientists that show that compounds in mate tea induce death in colon cancer cells. See, "Compounds in mate tea induce death in colon cancer cells."

 

 

In a recent University of Illinois (Urbana) study, scientists showed that human colon cancer cells die when they are exposed to the approximate number of bioactive compounds present in one cup of mate tea, which has long been consumed in South America for its medicinal properties.

 

 

But mate has a high caffeine content --- comparable to that of coffee. Usually, people drink it for its central nervous system stimulant effects. Such effects include increased energy and enhanced alertness. If you have a fast heart beat or have a genetically over-aroused nervous system, there's no need for more stimulation. You'd probably want a tea with a calming, relaxing affect on your body.

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5 Dangerous Eating Habits

5 Dangerous Eating Habits | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
Here are five problem-eating patterns that may be standing in the way of your health and happiness -- and how to unsnarl them for good.

Our relationship with food is complicated — and often a little confounding. Here are five problem-eating patterns that may be standing in the way of your health and happiness — and how to unsnarl them for good.

Even the healthiest eaters are prone to occasional food transgressions — a dinner downed in front of the TV, a lunch wolfed down on the way to an appointment, a snack attack that sneaks up on us. As long as such lackluster eating experiences are the exception, and not the rule, they’re probably no cause for worry. But what about when the occasional “whoops!” becomes part of a more persistent pattern?


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10 Cancer-Causers to Remove From Your Home : Green Kampong – Inspiring a greener today

10 Cancer-Causers to Remove From Your Home : Green Kampong – Inspiring a greener today | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
    Given poor government regulation, many of the cleaning products available on the market contain “everyday” carcinogens such as formaldehyde, nitrobenzene, methylene chloride, and napthelene, as well as reproductive toxins and hormone disruptors.

 

1. Air fresheners: Often contain napthelene and formaldehyde. Try zeolite or natural fragrances from essential oils. For more information, see Easy Greening: Air Fresheners.


2. Art supplies: Epoxy and rubber cement glues, acrylic paints and solvents, and permanent markers often contain carcinogens. For more information, see Arts and Crafts: Make it Safe.


3. Automotive supplies: Most are toxic. Keep them safely away from the house and dispose of at a hazardous waste disposal center.


4. Candles: Avoid artificially scented paraffin candles that produce combustion by-products, including soot. Beeswax only, with cotton wicks. For more on beeswax candles, see The Brilliant Beeswax Candle.


5. Carpet and upholstery shampoos: Use only wet-clean, natural ingredients. For DIY carpet cleaning, see how to Remove Stains and Pet Odors from Carpets.


6. Dry-cleaning: Choose clothes that don't need perchlorethylene to clean them. Ask for the wet-cleaning option at you local cleaners, or seek dry-cleaners that use liquid C02 or citrus juice cleaners. For more information, see Healthy and Green Dry Cleaning.


7. Flea, tick and lice control: Avoid lindane-based pesticides. For more information, see Natural Flea and Tick Control.


8. Paints and varnishes: Always chose low- or no-VOC finishes. For more information, see Is Your Paint Making You Sick?

 

9. Household pesticides: Go natural. Make a Sugar Ant Hotel.

 

10. Microwaves: Never microwave or heat food in a plastic container.

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Natural Trans Fats Less Unhealthy Than Manmade Variety

Natural Trans Fats Less Unhealthy Than Manmade Variety | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
Artery-clogging, manmade trans fats do increase the risk for heart disease, and efforts have been made to get them out of our food supply. Natural trans fats, however, are another story.

Via Nancy O'Sullivan
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High Levels of Arsenic Found in Organic Baby Foods - New Parent (blog)

High Levels of Arsenic Found in Organic Baby Foods - New Parent (blog) | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
ABC NewsHigh Levels of Arsenic Found in Organic Baby FoodsNew Parent (blog)Now the organic foods we thought were safer are turning out to be just as bad.
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Shut Up About Good Foods and Bad Foods! « shutupskinnybitches

Shut Up About Good Foods and Bad Foods! « shutupskinnybitches | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
Cheetos, and their rowdy friends, potato chips and chocolate cake, seem to be like “bad” foods. In fact, someone recently told me that her high school health class had an actual power point video entitled, “Bad Foods.” Is that ...
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Big meals in 'memory loss link'

Big meals in 'memory loss link' | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
A link between memory loss and a high calorie diet has been suggested by researchers in the US.

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Chemicals in Cosmetics and on Your Face

Chemicals in Cosmetics and on Your Face | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it

Scientists are talking about it; angry people are talking about it. The United States Food and Drug Administration is the government regulator of things like vaccines and pharmaceutical drugs, but when it comes to cosmetics (the topical stuff you put on your body like lotions, deodorant, and make-up) there seems to be a disconnect. The FDA only regulates the labeling of cosmetics, but the public safety of the chemicals in those products is assessed by the ”Cosmetic Ingredient Review” — which is funded by the industry. Go figure.


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Three 'Targeted' Cancer Drugs Raise Risk of Fatal Side Effects ...

Three 'Targeted' Cancer Drugs Raise Risk of Fatal Side Effects ... | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
-Treatment with three relatively new “targeted” cancer drugs has been linked to a slightly elevated chance of fatal side effects, according to a new analysis led by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
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8 Bad-for-Your-Bones Foods - Osteoporosis Center - Everyday Health

8 Bad-for-Your-Bones Foods - Osteoporosis Center - Everyday Health | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
When it comes to bone health, you might have a list of calcium-rich foods to eat. Now learn about foods that don't belong in your prevent-osteoporosis diet.
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14 Best and Worst Foods for Digestion

14 Best and Worst Foods for Digestion | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
Good for your gut: It's best to avoid some food—like fatty meats —to avoid tummy upset. But fortunately nature also provides foods that can ease our digestion.
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5 Snack Foods To Reduce Bad Cholesterol | Diet4.net

5 Snack Foods To Reduce Bad Cholesterol | Diet4.net | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
cholesterol level but we always wonder of more natural ways or foods to reduce bad cholesterol.
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Frying foods in olive, sunflower oils may not be bad for your heart

Frying foods in olive, sunflower oils may not be bad for your heart | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it

Rejoice, those who love fried foods: eating them may not put you at higher risk for coronary heart disease--if you're frying those foods in olive or sunflower oils.

 

A study published this week in the British Medical Journal analyzed data on 40,757 Spanish adults age 29 to 69 who were followed for an average 11 years. Free of coronary heart disease at the beginning of the study, they were asked what they ate and what cooking methods they used, then were tracked to see who developed coronary heart disease and who died.

 

During those 11 years, there were 606 events linked to coronary heart disease, such as heart attack or chest pain, and 1,135 people died from all causes. However, eating fried foods was not associated with incident coronary heart disease or coronary heart disease events, even after adjusting for various factors such as calorie intake, age, sex, body mass index and high blood pressure. The types of oils used to fry foods--olive, sunflower or other vegetable oils--didn't change the outcome.

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Study: Why Teens Sunbathe More, Use Sunscreen Less | Healthland | TIME.com

Study: Why Teens Sunbathe More, Use Sunscreen Less | Healthland | TIME.com | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
Most young teens aren't getting the message about sun safety, a new study in Pediatrics suggests.
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Dr. Isaac Eliaz Presents Anti-Aging Breakthrough at Leading Medical Conference

Dr. Isaac Eliaz Presents Anti-Aging Breakthrough at Leading Medical Conference | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it

Isaac Eliaz, M.D., M.S., L.Ac., distinguished medical doctor and leading Modified Citrus Pectin expert, gave a keynote presentation on Galectin-3 as a breakthrough biomarker for numerous life-threatening diseases. He also shared new research on the critical role of Modified Citrus Pectin (MCP) as the foremost Galectin-3 blocker. Dr. Eliaz's latest presentation was given to more than 1000 physicians, health practitioners, and scientists during the 19th Annual World Congress on Anti-Aging Medicine and Regenerative Biomedical Technologies (A4M). The A4M conference features over 80 world-renowned experts who present key clinical findings in human aging intervention.

"It's always a thrill to share cutting edge research with the medical community, demonstrating Modified Citrus Pectin's ability to promote health and prevent disease," says Dr. Eliaz. "MCP offers unprecedented health benefits by binding and blocking excess Galectin-3 molecules throughout the body. With the latest research linking Galectin-3 to the progression of numerous diseases, this presentation felt like a breakthrough moment where a new tool in medicine is being introduced to a whole medical community for the first time."


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7 "Healthy" Foods That Pack A Hefty Fat Punch - Forbes

7 "Healthy" Foods That Pack A Hefty Fat Punch - Forbes | Heal Or Die: Bad Foods? | Scoop.it
Forbes7 "Healthy" Foods That Pack A Hefty Fat PunchForbesThe distinction seems to lie in whether the coconut oil used is partially hydrogenated (bad) or virgin (good) and my label does not tell me that.

 

 

1. Soy Milk

Compared with milk — the most common comparison — soy milk isn’t particularly high calorie. One cup of soy milk contains approximately 130 calories, which is more than the 100 calories of nonfat milk, but fairly comparable to the 120 calories in skim. The problem comes when you read further, and see that there are 9.8 grams of sugar in one cup of plain soy milk. And if you choose the flavored varieties, they’ll be still higher in sugar. Some of the sugars in soy milk come from the soy itself, but much of it is from cane sugar or, as it may say “dehydrated cane juice”, the very type of white sugar many of us are trying to avoid.

 

 

2. Banana Chips

Yikes! That was my reaction when I finally read the fine print on one of my favorite late-night munchies. First of all, a “serving” consists of just 13 pieces – barely a handful. My typical night’s intake is probably triple that. Then there’s the fat content — in those paltry 13 chips lurk 10 grams of saturated fat, a whopping 48 percent of your daily allowance. And note that this is saturated fat – the kind that’s terrible for your heart and arteries and is typically associated with meat, cheese and other animal products. Why do banana chips contain so much saturated fat? Because they’re soaked in coconut oil, which is listed as the second ingredient, following bananas. Now, according to a report in the NY Times, scientists are busy arguing about the health status of coconut oil, which is indeed a saturated fat but is not considered as evil as the fat in meat. The distinction seems to lie in whether the coconut oil used is partially hydrogenated (bad) or virgin (good) and my label does not tell me that. Either way, with 160 calories in just 13 measly chips and 11 grams of total fat, they’re no replacement for the cookies I’d honestly rather have.

Smoothies can be calorie-dense 

 

 

3. Bagels

Apologies in advance to those of you who start your day by stopping by the local deli — this news will be unwelcome. The average 4-inch bagel contains between 300 and 500 calories — and that’s just the bagel itself, before you add the cream cheese or other toppings. “Schmear” your bagel with just two tablespoons of regular cream cheese and you’ve added another 100 calories and 6 grams of saturated fat. The same bagel — sans toppings — gives you a quarter of your daily sodium allotment, too.

 

 

4. Coated or Candied Nuts

I’m not talking about anything that obviously belongs in the candy department, like chocolate-covered hazelnuts or Jordan almonds. I just mean the nuts that come with a light savory-sweet coating, such as those you’d toss in a salad. Well get this; 1/4 cup of “lightly candied” walnuts contains 17 grams of fat (2 of them saturated), or 26 percent of your total daily allowance. That means that with a handful of nuts you’ve eaten a quarter of all the fat you should eat in a day. Then there are those 8 grams of sugar; in fact, glance down at the ingredient list and you’ll see sugar listed right after the walnuts themselves. While nuts themselves are calorie-rich, they’re also a good source of healthy fats, fiber, and protein. But stick to buying them raw and toasting them yourself, to avoid the added oils.

 

 

5. Granola

Make it yourself and you control what goes into it; hopefully oats and not a lot else. But buy store-bought packaged granola and you’re getting a lot more sugar than you bargained for, and some unwanted fats as well. One small (2/3 cup) serving of one popular granola, for example, has 210 calories, 60 of which are from fat. The total fat content is 7 grams, or 11 percent of your day’s allotment, and along with that fat come 15 grams of sugar. That’s a lot of sugar, and sure enough the ingredient list reveals cane sugar as number two, right under oats.

 

 

6. Dried fruit

Dried cranberries had become a staple of both my morning oatmeal and my evening salads, until I noticed the 22 grams of sugar listed on the label – and that’s just for a quarter of a cup. The calorie count isn’t so bad at 96 but the problem is, these calories are almost as empty of nutrition as if you were topping your cereal with M&Ms. Go down the list of nutrients and you see pretty much everything listed as zero – zero iron, zero protein, and even the fiber comes in at just 1 gram. About the only nutrient of significance is vitamin C at 18% of your daily recommended allowance, but you could get more than that in an apple, and almost ten times that in an orange. If you just have to have dried fruit on your cereal, choose a type that’s naturally sweet to begin with. Raisins, for example, typically have no added sugar because grapes are sweet. Even so, drying concentrates those natural sugars, so dried fruit will always pack many more calories than fresh.

 

 

7. Smoothies

This is another case where concentrating the original ingredients raises the calorie density. And then there are all those extras like yogurt, protein powders, even ice cream, that can undermine all your good intentions. Let’s start with a simple fruit smoothie; a banana and berry smoothie from Jamba Juice has 400 calories. Choose one of the sweeter combos, like banana, peanut butter and chocolate, and you’re downing a decadent 770 calories in one glass. And the Peenya Kowlada, which features pineapple sherbet? Ouch – 960 calories, or about half the entire day’s calories recommended for a typical adult woman. Even smoothies made at home contain more calories than if you ate the fruit itself, simply because they’re more concentrated and thus more calorie-dense. Keep your smoothies healthy by using water or ice as a base rather than fruit juice, adding nonfat plain yogurt instead of flavored yogurt or ice cream, and exercising reasonable portion control.

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