Hawaii Science and Technology Digest
1.6K views | +1 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Daily Magazine
onto Hawaii Science and Technology Digest
Scoop.it!

Redesigning Wi-Fi may let devices communicate more easily

Redesigning Wi-Fi may let devices communicate more easily | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it

A clever way forward for powering the internet of things.

 

Many prophets of information technology (IT) believe that the next big movement in their field will be the “internet of things”. This, they hope, will connect objects hitherto beyond the reach of IT’s tendrils so that, for example, your sofa can buzz your phone to tell you that you have left your wallet behind, or your refrigerator can order your groceries without you having to make a shopping list. That, though, will mean putting chips in your sofa, your wallet and your fridge to enable them to talk to the rest of the world. And those chips will need power, not least to run their communications.

 

Sometimes, this power will come from the electricity grid or a battery. But that is not always convenient. However Shyam Gollakota and his colleagues at the University of Washington, in Seattle, think they have at least part of an answer to the problem. They propose to reconfigure a chip’s communications so that they need almost no power to work.

 

Most conceptions of the internet of things assume the chips in sofas, wallets, fridges and so on will use technologies such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to communicate with each other—either directly, over short ranges, or via a base-station connected to the outside world, over longer ones. For a conventional chip to broadcast a Wi-Fi signal requires two things. First, it must generate a narrow-band carrier wave. Then, it must impress upon this wave a digital signal that a receiver can interpret.

 

Following Moore’s law, the components responsible for doing the impressing have become ever more efficient over the past couple of decades. Those generating the carrier wave, however, have not.

 

Dr Gollakota and his team reasoned that it should be possible to separate the jobs of generation and impression. The system they have designed has a central transmitter (which might be built into a Wi-Fi router) that broadcasts a pure carrier wave. Dr Gollakota’s new chips then impress binary data on this carrier wave by either reflecting it (for a one) or absorbing it (for a zero). Whether a chip reflects or absorbs the signal depends on whether or not its aerial is earthed, which is in turn controlled by a simple switch.

 

Not having to generate its own carrier wave reduces a chip’s power consumption ten-thousandfold, for throwing the switch requires only a minuscule amount of current. Moreover, though Dr Gollakota’s prototypes do still use batteries, this current could instead be extracted from the part of the carrier wave that is absorbed.

 

The chips in this system, which Dr Gollakota plans to unveil on March 17th at the USENIX Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation in Santa Clara, California can, he claims, transmit data at a rate of up to 11 megabits a second to smartphones or laptops over 30 metres (100 feet) away, and through walls. Though that rate is worse than standard Wi-Fi it is ten times better than the low-energy form of Bluetooth which is the current favourite for the internet of things.


Via Levin Chin, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Fascinating developments for the expansion of Wi-Fi and the Internet of Things (IoT).  Some of the initial breakthroughs have come from Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, which has designed a "magic wand" to relay medical data from a patient wearing a Wi-Fi equipped cuff to his/her health professional. The device uses special chips requiring very little power and employs encryption to protect the data transmitter to a health care facility. Aloha, Russ.
more...
Brenda West Mccullers's curator insight, March 5, 3:10 PM
Interesting article on "the next big movement" in the field of the internet. #technology #Wi-Fi #communication
Tony Guzman's curator insight, March 10, 10:05 AM
This article talks about the "Internet of Things" (IoT). Lately the scenarios shared here seem to be closer to reality. Thoughts?
Tony Guzman's curator insight, March 10, 10:09 AM
This article talks about the "Internet of Things" (IoT). Lately the scenarios shared here seem to be closer to reality. Thoughts?
Hawaii Science and Technology Digest
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr.
Scoop.it!

The Pentagon is building a ‘self-aware’ killer robot army fueled by social media — INSURGE intelligence

The Pentagon is building a 'self-aware' killer robot army fueled by social media - INSURGE intelligence - Medium
Official US defence and NATO documents confirm that autonomous weapon systems will kill targets, including civilians, based on tweets…
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Here's the future of warfare. Anyone can and will be target. Killer drones are just the beginning.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr.
Scoop.it!

Your words may predict your future mental health

Your words may predict your future mental health | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
Can the way you speak and write today predict your future mental state, even the onset of psychosis? In this fascinating talk, neuroscientist Mariano Sigman reflects on ancient Greece and the origins of introspection to investigate how our words hint at our inner lives and details a word-mapping algorithm that could predict the development of schizophrenia. "We may be seeing in the future a very different form of mental health," Sigman says, "based on objective, quantitative and automated analysis of the words we write, of the words we say."
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Another valuable set of ideas from neurological science. Our words can unlock our deepest fears and, yet, can help us recreate a new life. Words can also be powerful diagnostic tools in the area of mental health.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr.
Scoop.it!

This is your brain on communication

This is your brain on communication | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
Neuroscientist Uri Hasson researches the basis of human communication, and experiments from his lab reveal that even across different languages, our brains show similar activity, or become "aligned," when we hear the same idea or story. This amazing neural mechanism allows us to transmit brain patterns, sharing memories and knowledge. "We can communicate because we have a common code that presents meaning," Hasson says.
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Interesting concept. Our brains are dimly amazing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr.
Scoop.it!

Forbes Welcome

Forbes Welcome page -- Forbes is a global media company, focusing on business, investing, technology, entrepreneurship, leadership, and lifestyle.
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Forbes is a must have publication for those seeking success in this digital age. Great, insightful articles.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

This Robot Uses Machine Learning to Take Care of Absent-Minded Humans

This Robot Uses Machine Learning to Take Care of Absent-Minded Humans | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
Watch-Bot will never let you forget to put the milk back in the fridge

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
As much as I remain skeptical machine intelligence and the Internet of Things, I must admit this idea has merit, now that my advancing years are taking their toll.  I may have to rearrange my biases and preferences as age exacts its revenge.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Technology and Gadgets
Scoop.it!

In Ear Language Translator by Waverly Labs

Wearable technology that gives you the ability to have conversations with people speaking other languages

Via Tiaan Jonker
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Neat idea that should prove popular as more cultures meet each other.  'Reminds me of the "universal translator" device used in some of the "Star Trek" episodes (original tv series) and movies.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

Open Hardware Multimeter Concept

Open Hardware Multimeter Concept | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it

This video shows a very interesting concept of how you can build an open hardware multimeter, which lets you get considerable accuracy at a cost that is somewhat lower than existing commercial multimeters.


Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Those of use in the electronics field, including broadcast engineering, amateur radio (ham radio), communications, or even audio engineering will find this article interesting and possibly cost saving.  A good multimeter is essential to make critical assessments of electronic equipment, and a good meter can be quite expensive. This video shows you how to build an efficient, accurate multimeter using open hardware. A valuable reference tool for do-it-yourselfers.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

Study decodes genetic circuitry for bacterial spore formation

Study decodes genetic circuitry for bacterial spore formation | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
A team led by Rice University bioengineering researchers has decoded the mechanism that some bacteria use to make life-or-death decisions during extremely tough times.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
This project from researchers at Rice University could unravel some of the mysteries of life and disease. The impact on medicine and health could be profound.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

LinkedIn user? Your data may be up for sale | ZDNet

LinkedIn user? Your data may be up for sale | ZDNet | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
You need to change your password now.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Here we go again. Apparently, there are no limits what some companies will do to make sales at the expense of your personal data.  As the article suggests, change your passwords frequently. Online privacy is rapidly becoming a myth.  Another tool I use to protect my personal data is a VPN (virtual private network), which encrypts your messages and traffic. 
more...
THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*'s curator insight, May 18, 10:54 PM

Change you password folks.

voicetortoise's comment, May 18, 11:57 PM
Its magnificent :)
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Broadcast Engineering Notes
Scoop.it!

Interference Biggest Radio Complaint to FCC - Radio Ink

Interference Biggest Radio Complaint to FCC - Radio Ink | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
As part of the FCC's new approach to transparency it has launched a new Consumer Complaint Data Center. The online listing of consumer complaints includes how many calls are made to the government agency about radio. The biggest complaint ( 7,391 of them) is about interference. What's next?

Via David Hall
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Thanks to reporter David Hall for this look at what people complain about when they contact the FCC.  No surprise here--interference and noise are the biggest issues facing both consumers and FCC regulators.  RFI is so bad in some urban areas, that AM and FM broadcasts are severely degraded.  The main culprit is the rapid expansion of non-FCC compliant digital devices, poorly shielded power supplies, and sloppy technical installations in homes and businesses.  Noise is a massive headache that will impact the future of all wireless communication, from the internet to commercial broadcasting.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

You can swallow this origami Robot and it will help Patch you up

You can swallow this origami Robot and it will help Patch you up | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
The tiny robot can patch wounds, retrieve foreign objects or deliver medicine inside the stomach.

Via TechinBiz
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
A simply amazing device that can advance the state of public health and medicine ...  take two robots and call me in the morning.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

RoboCop is real – and could be Patrolling a Mall near you

RoboCop is real – and could be Patrolling a Mall near you | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
There’s a new sheriff in town at the Stanford shopping center, and he has high-definition infra-red cameras and can process 300 license plates a minute

Via TechinBiz
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Science Fiction is becoming science fact.  Although this robot patrolling the Stanford Shopping Center is not like the machine in the "Robo Cop" film franchise, it does point the way to automated law enforcement.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Digital Transformation of Businesses
Scoop.it!

Your smartphone is leaking your information

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Bram is a PhD student in computer science at the Expertise Centr

Via Farid Mheir
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Thanks to reporter Farid Mheir for the alarming look at how your smartphone messages are compromised by Wi-Fi connections.  As a matter of principal, I don't use public Wi-Fi (public libraries and schools excepted) connections because of the reasons cited in this video.  Privacy is mostly dead these days.  Be careful what networks you use.
more...
Farid Mheir's curator insight, May 16, 9:14 PM

An 8 minute video that will make you rethink your hunt for free wifi in public spaces...

Scooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr.
Scoop.it!

China’s scary lesson to the world: Censoring the Internet works

China’s scary lesson to the world: Censoring the Internet works | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
China is confidently promoting its vision of “Internet Sovereignty.”
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Some scary thoughts about the viability of a free, uncensored Internet. China may have found a way to completely control what found on the Internet. Big Brother is becoming all too real.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr.
Scoop.it!

Need a Business Idea? Here are 55

Need a Business Idea? Here are 55 | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
You can start any of these home based businesses for less than $5,000.
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Here are some great ideas for creating a home-based business. Check out these suggestions for becoming your own boss.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr.
Scoop.it!

Technology News

Technology News | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
CNET news editors and reporters provide top technology news, with investigative reporting and in-depth coverage of tech issues and events.
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Another must have publication for those who want to make sense of our digital age.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr.
Scoop.it!

Inside OpenAI, Elon Musk’s Wild Plan to Set Artificial Intelligence Free

Inside OpenAI, Elon Musk’s Wild Plan to Set Artificial Intelligence Free | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
OpenAI wants to give away the 21st century's most transformative technology. In the process, it could remake the way people make tech.
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
A new way of looking at knowledge is on the horizon, thanks to Elon Musk. AI is already changing our world...are we ready for some fundamental changes in how we live?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

Prototyping Just Went to the Next Level With Framer

Prototyping Just Went to the Next Level With Framer | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
The latest version of Framer brings closure (well, that’s my opinion anyway) to the ‘should designers code’ argument. Never has there been a greater opportunity, as a visual designer

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Visual designers should find this tool useful.  Interesting concept.
more...
Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, May 22, 10:20 AM

The perfect match for #designers dealing with #code.

Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

The *Official AndreasCY* - Bonus Reads #1

Hey there, thanks for visiting! Don't miss these Bonus Reads!

 

1. Is the Nearshore Trend All about Cost?
-> http://tiny.cc/NearshoreOutsourcing
2. Yes – Burglar Alarms to Work
-> http://tiny.cc/BurglarAlarms

 

Make sure to hit that LIKE button: https://www.facebook.com/officialandreascy ;

 

Have any friends who should join us? Let them know: https://officialandreascy.blogspot.com


Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
A nice selection of bonus articles from "The Official AndreasCY."  I liked the article on burglar alarms--very relevant to our uncertain times.
more...
Andreas Christodoulou's curator insight, May 23, 3:09 AM
It's Bonus Time!
Stephania Savva's curator insight, May 23, 3:12 AM
Nothing beats reading a couple of interesting articles.
THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*'s comment, May 26, 2:15 PM
Thank you all!!
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Digital Transformation of Businesses
Scoop.it!

Get Ready for High-Frequency Lawyers

Get Ready for High-Frequency Lawyers | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
The legal profession could soon be disrupted by algorithms, too.

Via Farid Mheir
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Thanks to reporter Farid Mheir for this leading edge report on how the legal profession could be affected by e-commerce. Nice shot of "Robby the Robot" from the film "Forbidden Planet."
more...
Farid Mheir's curator insight, May 16, 9:22 PM

Combine high-frequency lawyers with block chain technology and you could really have an impact on the supply chain of most organizations. Say a grocer is buying tomatoes or strawberries. Contracts are drawn months in advance setting prices based on quality of products and delivery efficiency. I assume that something like this would allow for terms of the contract to be renegotiated in real-time to reflect how good - or bad - the products and services are. Who will be the first to jump on this? Walmart? Kroger? Costco? Procter and Gamble?

Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

Smart Home and Smartphone: A Marriage Made in Heaven - Uxari Home Automation

Smart Home and Smartphone: A Marriage Made in Heaven - Uxari Home Automation | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it

The smart home of the 21st century is getting smarter by the day. Just look at what we can do here at Uxari. We make it possible for you to control thermostats and lighting no matter where you are in the world; we make it possible for you to unlock and lock your doors without ever using a key.


Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
A great idea from Uxari Home Automation--just be sure your control network can't be hacked or compromised.  I'm concerned that these new IoT devices may lack strong security protocols.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

9 Technologies that will make your Life Easier

9 Technologies that will make your Life Easier | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
Here are nine Technologies that will make your Life Easier

Via TechinBiz
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
A list of high-tech tools, apps, and equipment that will make daily life easier.  The list includes:
A new portable battery; Fuze Crunch tech newsletter; New apps for students; Wireless Chargers; MyHomework app for students; Alarm Clock apps; Wearable Technology; Storage expansion for smartphones and PCs; A universal remote; and Multi-purpose tools for home and business.
more...
All Real Estates Opportunities's curator insight, May 19, 6:09 AM
This will make people's life easier
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Broadcast Engineering Notes
Scoop.it!

A Broadcast Engineering Tutorial for Non-Engineers by Skip Pizzi

Read / Download : http://bitly.com/1WJZxxG
Via David Hall
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
Thanks to reporter David Hall for this intriguing and well-presented video from Skip Pizzi.  For those of us in the broadcast field, both engineers and non-technical staff, this tutorial serves as an easily digestible guide to broadcast engineering.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

Motorola looks set to bring back the Flip Phone

Motorola looks set to bring back the Flip Phone | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it
Motorola looks set to release a new flip phone that harkens back to the early 2000s. It will be unveiled on June 9, according to the teaser.

Via TechinBiz
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
I had one of these Motorola Flip Phones a decade ago and really liked its portability.  Although the keys were a challenge for my stubby fingers, I thought the design was quite good.  This reinvented flip phone, hopefully with some upgrades, should be a good seller if the price is reasonable.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Russell R. Roberts, Jr. from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

Google launches Science Journal to turn your phone into a research lab

Google launches Science Journal to turn your phone into a research lab | Hawaii Science and Technology Digest | Scoop.it

Google believes there's a scientist in all of us, so it's launching a new app that turns your phone into a powerful little research lab.


Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s insight:
A fantastically intriguing app from Google.  As a part-time science and math teacher, I found this app useful and somewhat addictive.
more...
No comment yet.