Hauntology
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Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas
Curated by Sean Albiez
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Why the 1970s was the most terrifying decade - Richard Littler - The Telegraph

Why the 1970s was the most terrifying decade - Richard Littler - The Telegraph | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'I had thought Scarfolk a personal interpretation of the 1970s filtered through my own (numerous) childhood neuroticisms, fears and memory fragments; Scarfolk certainly does not reflect what for many is the decade of flares, discos and lava lamps. Influenced by Monty Python, George Orwell, The League of Gentlemen, Chris Morris, and cartoonists such as Gerald Scarfe and Ralph Steadman, I was aware that Scarfolk also fits into a movement of sorts called ‘Hauntology’, which is concerned with what some might consider darker aspects of the 1970s: Brutalist architecture, disquieting TV theme music, a resurgent interest in paganism, new (now old) technologies and other everyday ephemera. Hauntology also heavily plays on and warps the half-memories of those who were brought up between the late 60s and early 80s. It’s not nostalgia as such; there are no rose-tinted spectacles, nor is there a desire for those days to return.' - Richard Littler

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CLOSE-UP | Hauntologies: The Ghost, Voice and the Gallery

CLOSE-UP | Hauntologies: The Ghost, Voice and the Gallery | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'In Hauntologies Akomfrah is referencing a pluralised consideration of the critical notion of "hauntology". It is the nature of the ghost and the situation of being haunted that frames and forms this term. Hauntology is itself a notion with many permutations, from the phantasmagoria, the uncanny and Jacques Derrida to more recent writing on sonic theories and music. Articles and blog posts online overflow with complaints about the vagueness of, or lack of definition associated with this term. As a term hauntology dissects language relating to ghosts, the situation of being haunted, and the implications these have upon our understanding of the past in the present.' - Claire M. Holdsworth

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Toward a Right-Wing Hauntology: Mark Fisher's 'Ghosts of My Life' [Christopher Pankhurst - review]

Toward a Right-Wing Hauntology: Mark Fisher's 'Ghosts of My Life' [Christopher Pankhurst - review] | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Given that hauntology is predicated on the notion that the past will continue to intrude into the present, it seems to me to be a perfect mode of analysis for perennialists. The cyclic view of history recognizes that any particular culture must grow and develop according to certain principles, that there is a morphology of history, and also that history is cyclic. When this is realized, it will be seen that the Marxist view of history falls short because it posits a utopian endpoint. And, as Spengler observed, optimism is cowardice. In the perennialist view of history there is an inevitable unfolding, a flowering, but it will always lead to death (and then rebirth). So, just as for an individual, “the child is father to the man,” so for culture, “Time present and time past Are both perhaps present in time future And time future contained in time past.”

 

Hauntology is right to suggest that Marx can be resurrected because the past can never be finally laid to rest. But it doesn’t go far enough. The communist phase does return, but it returns at the end of each cycle, again and again. There is no endpoint, just eternal unfolding.' - Christopher Pankhurst

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Day #162/365: Hauntology, places where society goes to dream, the deletion of spectres and the making of an ungenre - A Year In The Country

Day #162/365: Hauntology, places where society goes to dream, the deletion of spectres and the making of an ungenre - A Year In The Country | Hauntology | Scoop.it
A discussion brought about by Simon Reynolds pointing out the deletion of hauntology as a genre in the world's electronic ether encyclopedia.
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The Fugitive Futurist (1924) - YouTube

'This witty short proffers futuristic visions of London landmarks by way of a 'magic' camera. But while its gleeful inventor turns out to be an escapee from the local asylum, French director Gaston Quiribet may not have been entirely barking up the wrong tree with one of his trick shots - which imagines Trafalgar Square flooded by rising sea levels. Could this be a prophetic glimpse of our great capital's fate?' (Simon McCallum)

All titles on the BFI Films channel are preserved in the vast collections of the BFI National Archive. To find out more about the Archive visit 

http://www.bfi.org.uk/archive-collections

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Book Review: Feminism and Popular Culture: Investigating the Postfeminist Mystique by Rebecca Munford and Melanie Waters

Book Review: Feminism and Popular Culture: Investigating the Postfeminist Mystique by Rebecca Munford and Melanie Waters | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Is feminism undead? Feminism and Popular Culture seeks to map the fraught and often unpredictable relationship between popular culture, feminism and postfeminism ...

 

Feminism & Popular Culture is different from others texts in the literature in that it emphasizes the impact of the postfeminist Gothic throughout ...

 

Chapter 1, ‘‘Postfeminism’ or ‘ghost feminism’?’ puts Madonna’s legacy or affect within the context of Derrida’s hauntology: “With its investment in notions of otherness, memory, nostalgia, inheritance and futurity, hauntology appears to encompass many of the issues that have beset debates in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries about feminism’s relationship to the past and its potential to intervene in women’s futures'  - Jade Montserrat

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Mark Fisher - Ghosts Of My Life [Zer0 Books]

Mark Fisher - Ghosts Of My Life [Zer0 Books] | Hauntology | Scoop.it

Ghosts Of My Life out February 2014 on Zer0 books. Cover photograph by Chris Heppell and illustrations by Laura Oldfield Ford.

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Clifton Rocks Railway - Bristol

Clifton Rocks Railway - Bristol | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Welcome to the Clifton Rocks Railway restoration project official site. The project is dedicated to restoring one of Bristol's hidden gems......'

 

Also a BBC studio in WWII ...

 

'Top Room: Transmitters Various transmitters were incorporated in this room. One served Bristol with programmes whilst two others were set up o keep the station in touch with the outside World in an extreme emergency. The largest transmitter was an American RCA 'H' group transmitter operating on 203.5 m and broadcasting the home service. This had been brought over from America on lend lease in the early days of the War. The other two consisted of a Harvey McNamara shortwave set, and an ex RAF medium wave transmitter for restoring communication between the other main provincial and metropolitan broadcasting stations should the Post Office telephone lines be damaged by enemy action.

 

Second Chamber Down: Studio This was equipped with piano, gramophone and other facilities for musical, dramatic or school's programmes and could take a cast of 10-15 actors. Poor acoustics were accommodated by installing heavy carpets and providing strategically placed quilting on the walls. Small scale musical, dramatic or feature programmes could be produced in this room.

 

The Third Chamber Down: Recording Room This room contained a Philips-Miller record and replay machine which used gelatine coated celluloid film 7mm wide, onto which recordings were cut with a sapphire stylus. Also within this room were sufficient programmes for many weeks of broadcasting.

 

Fourth Chamber Down: Control Room Here the BBC Engineers surpassed themselves in compressing an enormous amount of equipment into a very small space. The room incorporated switching gear for no fewer than 80 land lines leading to outside stations. The Post Office routed these in various formations to minimise the risk of a single bomb damaging all in one go.'

Sean Albiez's insight:

Drove past here the other day - fascinated by it ...

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The Soulless Party - Tales From The Black Meadow

The Soulless Party - Tales From The Black Meadow | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Wha† does it feel like to get los† in †ime? Listen to Tales From The Black Meadow and be introduced to the strange and wonderful world of Hammer Horror, of British Folklore, of Radiophonic Scores and things that go bump in the night. A delirious and delicious mystery…' - forestpunk

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The Hauntology of Daily Life - Marc Weidenbaum

The Hauntology of Daily Life - Marc Weidenbaum | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'There is a stretch of road between Pasadena and Glendale where I will always hear the rhythmic threadbare minimal techno of Monolake’s album Cinemascope, even if Led Zeppelin is blasting on the radio,even if I am deep in conversation on the phone or with a fellow passenger, even if the windows are open and letting in the sirens of passing police cars, all of which has happened. More than a decade ago, on a visit to the Los Angeles area, I blasted a CD of that album in a rental car after a long day of meetings, on my way to visit a friend across town, and though I have never again sat in that particular car, and I have long since parted ways with that employer, and my physical copy of the Monolake album is buried in a box in my closet, the music still hovers on the highway, waiting for me to trigger it simply by driving through it.' - Marc Weidenbaum

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Jason Simpson's curator insight, August 20, 2013 8:37 PM

the music still hovers on the highway, waiting for me to trigger it simply by driving through it.' - Marc Weidenbaum

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Utopia Loops, Ghost Legacies | Alluvium

Utopia Loops, Ghost Legacies | Alluvium | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Clearly, what hauntology (dis)embodies is not a restorative nostalgia. Nor is it reducible to facile retro-futurism; in music and visual forms we are not seeing the straightforward reproduction of old styles, but rather their discomposition which is a reflexive symptom of the collective failure of the social imagination. In this, hauntology in its pop culture aspects functions as a negative dialectic struggling with this legacy of Margaret Thatcher, reminding us of the failure to imagine an alternative and in doing so stressing the necessity of attempting to do so. This is the legacy that we are left with. The question is, is there anything beyond spectral politics?' - Tony Venezia

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John Akomfrah’s Hauntologies - BFI

John Akomfrah’s Hauntologies - BFI | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The overriding sensation as you walk through the gallery is one of a near-swoon, and this is apt: Akomfrah has been exploring the genre of costume drama, how it stages history and makes us nostalgic for a time we may never have known.' - Laura Allsop

 

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The Hauntology of Media Addiction - Eva Zekany - Forum: Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts

'This article proposes an exploration of the phenomenon of media addiction as the expression of a haunting: the sporadic re-emergence of nostalgia for presence, materiality, and the body. After a brief description of the contemporary phenomenon of media addiction, I will in turn bring forward some of the earliest key conflicts involving materiality and immateriality surrounding networked media. These incursions into the history of problematic human-media relationships set the scene for their current incarnations - media addictions - where the incongruity between materiality and immateriality, presence and unpresence, are embodied by figures such as the Internet addict. The clash of materiality and immateriality within media feeds into ideas of spectrality and danger, which are unavoidably problematised as threats to the health and wellbeing of populations in postindustrial contexts. The last section of this paper explores the place of media addiction as an unavoidable human-technology bond that politics of life cannot escape.' - Eva Zekany

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R/J/L-H: Extract from a conversation with Mark Fisher, regarding Hauntology...

R/J/L-H: Extract from a conversation with Mark Fisher, regarding Hauntology... | Hauntology | Scoop.it

R/J/L-H: In relation to music, specifically, Simon (Reynolds) say's that he has now come to prefer the term Memoradelia. Any thoughts?

MF: I think Memoradelia only captures part of it. The spectral dimension is a very important part of Hauntology. This idea of lost futures isn't about memory, not straightforwardly anyway, it's about anticipation, it's about... For me a key aspect of Hauntology is the age of the virtual, as I call it. The capacity of the virtual to effect things. A lot of what we call spectral, ghostly, can be classified under that term. The reason why the concept of haunting seems so apasit in the 21st century, was the sense of we live in the ruins of lost futures, really, the future failed to arrive, in the 21st century. Not a specific detrimental future with had in mind failed to arrive, but the sense of futurity had disappeared from 21st century life. It's that pang, that longing, for a future that failed to arrive, seems to me one of the curial dimensions.

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Popping Off: How Weird Al, Drake, PC Music and You Are All Caught up in the Same Feedback Loop - Aimee Cliff

Popping Off: How Weird Al, Drake, PC Music and You Are All Caught up in the Same Feedback Loop - Aimee Cliff | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Today, we don’t just consume stuff online, we document every second of our interaction with said stuff. Within seconds of its release we re-produce it, screenshot it, memeify it and attach emojis to it (you don’t have to look much further than Nicki’s “Anaconda” cover for an example). Our culture is a feedback loop, and by that logic we no longer need parody artists to exist, feeding top-down satirical interpretations of pop cultural phenomena to us, because pop, high and parody culture all exist together in one entangled knot.' - Aimee Cliff

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The Presence of the Past: from Ancestor Worship to Hauntology - Christopher Pankhurst

The Presence of the Past: from Ancestor Worship to Hauntology - Christopher Pankhurst | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'What hauntology demonstrates is that our conception of the dead has progressed a stage further. It would appear that in order for us to engage with the dead now it is necessary to become like them. Hauntology represents an ontological erasure of the dead, but also of the living as well. By extending the concept of the spectral to all notions of exchange we universalize the principle that the ghost is the motor within otherwise dead matter. When we look at a photograph of a deceased relative we feel that they still in some partial way exist for us. The photograph is a mere object of paper and light sensitive chemicals but in some way the presence of the dead haunts it. But who is it who is witness to this haunting? It is precisely the hidden being behind things, the animating presence, the ghost in the machine. This insubstantial self attaches itself to things, whether human or otherwise, and we experience all meaningful interaction within the “insubstance” of this self; a hauntological discourse amongst equally spectral entities.' - Christopher Pankhurst

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Spectral Anatomies: Heritage, Hauntology and the ‘Ghosts’ of Varosha | Colin Sterling | Present Pasts

Spectral Anatomies: Heritage, Hauntology and the ‘Ghosts’ of Varosha | Colin Sterling | Present Pasts | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'This paper unravels the idea of the ‘ghost town’ - and more specifically the deserted district of Varosha, Famagusta - as it relates to heritage, questioning the discursive dynamics and affective potential of what can seem a trite and therefore hollow phrase. Drawing on apposite theories of hauntology (Derrida 1993) and the ghosts of place (Bell 1997) I argue that there is a dense back-and-forth between two distinct positions in this term, both of which play into wider heritage processes. The first understands the ghost town as an empty if uniquely atmospheric space, ripe for development or ‘dark tourism’ (Lennon and Foley 2000). Heritage is implicated here in the protection and promotion of sites which may be perceived as ‘ruin porn’ - by turns melancholy and exhilarating but fundamentally removed from contemporary life. The second position unsettles this reading by focusing on the complexities of the very word ‘ghost’, here understood as ‘the sense of the presence of those who are not physically there’ (Bell 1997: 813). From this perspective, common heritage practices (including collecting, exhibiting and narrating) might be seen as an attempt to psychologically re-inhabit vacant places, a process which takes on extra significance around the highly politicised context of Varosha. Through fieldwork, archival research and intertextual and visual analysis I track the description of Varosha as a ghost town across journalism, contemporary art and diasporic discourse, in the process anatomising this spectral designation to reconceptualise its wider relevance to heritage.' - Colin Sterling

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Hauntology: The Spectre of Pop - Tida Wilson - FUTURE COLLECTIVE

Hauntology: The Spectre of Pop - Tida Wilson - FUTURE COLLECTIVE | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The birth of popular culture also brought about its very own destruction, albeit quite prematurely. But what is culture if not a form of recycling, an ongoing citation? We know that there is nothing new under the sun. What we considered as new, is the not yet explored. How then, this exploration could be made entirely possible? How do we revive what’s already—or what’s always—been dead? What is exactly to be done?'

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The Quietus | Features | In Extremis | Deviant Logic Unfolding: English Heretic Interviewed

The Quietus | Features | In Extremis | Deviant Logic Unfolding: English Heretic Interviewed | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'English Heretic's releases are far more than mere concept albums, though. As Andy Sharp, chief executive of English Heretic, reveals, they're conceived through an extraordinary and elaborate creative process, forming multimedia mash-ups to "fecundate the imagination". His methodology takes in magick, psychogeography and horror film geekdom, along with firm roots in Britain's industrial music culture of the early 1980s, to form potent, novel topographies of an otherwise unconnected world of occultists and psychopaths.' - Russell Cuzner

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The Quietus | Features | Escape Velocity | Tales Of The Uncanny: Sarah Angliss Interviewed

The Quietus | Features | Escape Velocity | Tales Of The Uncanny: Sarah Angliss Interviewed | Hauntology | Scoop.it
Ahead of her BFI Gothic show, composer, inventor and sound historian Sarah Angliss talks to Stuart Huggett about uncanny presences in music, mechanics and song
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Apparition Apparatus: Contemporary Urban Hauntology

'Project Summary

Cold weather cultures deploy legends of ghosts and snow creatures as figurative intermediaries to explain and manage severe weather. These echoplasmic mediators bring forth issues of wayfinding, exposure and shelter from the scope of folklore directly tied to the effects of severe weather. Apparition Apparatus incorporates self-sustaining technology and real-time input to urban infrastructure and architecture to act as a wayfinding and localized weather warning system for those caught on their journey to safety and shelter. Since an apparition can leak beyond containment and carry itself across frequencies far beyond physical boundaries, assistance and information arrives before first responders can expand their scope and cover the physical distance. It is a ghostly companion for navigating the cold weather city. The Apparition Apparatus is at times a voice, a presence, footprints, signals, reflections on a window pane, a doorway, a road, in various configuration and purpose as are the figures of folklores to help manage the scope of harsh weather. The configuration is infrastructural, architectural and technological derived from contemporary use of information, but the interaction is tied to deep rooted traditions of cold place folklore.' - Janet Yoon

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The Ghosts of Place | The White Review

The Ghosts of Place | The White Review | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'What is a ghost? The question has gained a particular value in the last decade or so owing to the influence of Derrida’s concept of hauntology, a pun on ontology referring to the spectre of Marxism. As it is understood in a post-Derridean context, the concept refers to a broad range of cultural phenomenon characterised, above all, by a certain collapse in the spatio-temporal order, signalling the radical collision of old and new. It is a Ballardian vision of time, in which the end has already occurred and we are now – perhaps unknowingly – living in its shadow.' - Dylan Trigg

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