Hauntology
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Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas
Curated by Sean Albiez
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Re-imagining Place with Filters: More than Meets the Eye - Journal of Creative Technologies - Marsha Berry

Re-imagining Place with Filters: More than Meets the Eye - Journal of Creative Technologies - Marsha Berry | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'As an aesthetic, hauntology is located in the notion of nostalgia as an unsettling sense of the intrusions of past imaginings of a utopian future into the present. ... I use this term to refer to the unsettling qualities faux-vintage smart phone camera apps impart to photographs and videos of contemporary life.  Smartphones encourage people’s dislocation from physical surroundings.  The spectral co-presence of others frequently disrupts face-to-face encounters.  In turn, this fosters widespread nostalgia for a lost utopian future where there is no pressure for constant connection via networked technology.' - Marsha Berry

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The Faux-Vintage Photo: Full Essay (Parts I, II and III) » Cyborgology

The Faux-Vintage Photo: Full Essay (Parts I, II and III) » Cyborgology | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'In this essay, I hope to show how faux-vintage photography, while seemingly banal, helps illustrate larger trends about social media in general. The faux-vintage photo, while getting a lot of attention in this essay, is merely an illustrative example of a larger trend whereby social media increasingly force us to view our present as always a potential documented past. But we have a ways to go before I can elaborate on that point. Some technological background is in order.' Nathan Jurgenson

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Authorship of the Now - Chris Baraniuk

Authorship of the Now - Chris Baraniuk | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'It is easy to see that we have "all" become poets and scribes, but we share with institutional media the ability to "time-travel", as Wanenchak puts it. That is, in our ability to atemporalise what we insistently refer to as the present.' Chris Baraniuk

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