Hauntology
15.5K views | +4 today
Follow
Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas
Curated by Sean Albiez
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Excavating the Future

Excavating the Future | Hauntology | Scoop.it

From 2012

 

'Le Corbusier never had one of his designs built in the UK, but the closest thing to a British Corbusian building might be St. Peter’s Seminary in Cardross, Scotland. The building was designed by the Gillespie Kidd & Coia office and completed in 1966 ...

 

What you find when you go there – hidden on a hilltop just outside of Cardross, west of Glasgow – is amazing and horrific at the same time. The majestic piece of modernist architecture, featuring many imaginative elements, was practically obsolete by the time it was completed. The catholic institutions had witnessed decline, and by the end of the 1970s only some 20 students attended the college.After merely twenty years of use as a catholic college, seminary and monastery, the structure was abandoned in the early 1980s.' - Mark Minkjan

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

A Walk Through Time In Spitalfields - Adam Tuck

A Walk Through Time In Spitalfields - Adam Tuck | Hauntology | Scoop.it

From 2012

 

'After seeing the work of photographer C.A. Mathew published on Spitalfields Life, Adam Tuck was inspired to revisit the locations of the pictures taken a century ago. Subtly blending his own photographs of Spitalfields 2012 with C.A.Mathew’s photographs of Spitalfields 1912, Adam has initiated an unlikely collaboration with a photographer of a century ago and created a new series of images of compelling resonance. 

 

In these montages, people of today co-exist in the same space with people of the past, manifesting a sensation I have always felt in Spitalfields – that all of history is present here. Yet those of a hundred years ago knew they were being photographed and many are pictured looking at the camera, whereas passsersby in the present day are mostly self-absorbed.  The effect is of those from the past wondering at a vision of the future, while those of our own day are entirely unaware of this ghostly audience.' - The Gentle Author

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

A Living Sermon: OST BBC Records Special - Robin The Fog

A Living Sermon: OST BBC Records Special - Robin The Fog | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'It is with great pleasure that I hereby present the podcast of last Saturday’s edition of OST on Resonance FM, a two-hour special devoted to the many faces of BBC Records, compiled and presented by myself in my capacity as the corporation’s ‘Resident Hauntologist’. 

 

I’ve tried to steer clear of anything instantly recognisable, but there’s some truly fabulous stuff buried in this mix – songs, voices, sound effects, girl guides, home movie musics, steam trains in stereo, church bells (not an entire LP’s worth, though I could have easily managed it!), hi-fi maintenance tips, how to offer someone fruit in German, and of course a generous portion of Radiophonic nuggets, some of which will hopefully come as a surprise. It’s sometimes hard to believe just what a wide variety of weird and wonderful things BBC Records were putting out in its 60s and 70s heyday; and harder still to believe that any label could be responsible for both Keith Harris and Orville and ‘Sounds Of Death and Horror’. Then again, perhaps it’s not so hard after all…' - Robin The Fog

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Creative Review - Have you been to Scarfolk?

Creative Review - Have you been to Scarfolk? | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Scarfolk is a town in the North West of England. Its precise location is not entirely clear, but we do know when it is: the town is in a perpetual, decade-long loop of the 1970s. Scarfolk Council recently opened its archives to the public and made available many artifacts at scarfolk.blogspot.co.uk: from public information posters to ice-cream advertisements to screenshots of TV programmes and films. There are also music and field recordings.

 

Certain themes resurface: the municipal, the occult, childhood and school days, totalitarianism and dystopia, memory and nostalgia, societal paranoia and fear of disease, television and radio' - Richard Littler

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Moon Wiring Club ~ Ghostland of Departed Buildings

From 2012

 

Put your glad rags on, and have a slow saunter around places that no longer exist. 

Extracted from the Moon Wiring Club album 'Today Bread, Tomorrow Secrets' (GEpH006LP).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

The Hauntology of The Legend of Zelda

The Hauntology of The Legend of Zelda | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'One of the most striking and interactive uses of the hauntological style is in regards to video games, whereby hauntology affects not only the artistic vision, but also the psychological implications of the gaming process. Perhaps the most notably recent examples of majorly commercial hauntological video games have been Fallout and BioShock. Both games take place in retro-futuristic worlds, where the aesthetics and ideas of former decades clash with modern science and technologies in a dystopian manner. Throughout the games, the specters of the past haunt the player through the form of old audio recordings, seemingly dated ideological references, and distant yet all too familiar aesthetics.' - 'Mike'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Metamodernism and Belle and Sebastian: Just a MetaModern Rock Song

Metamodernism and Belle and Sebastian: Just a MetaModern Rock Song | Hauntology | Scoop.it

From 2012

 

"Metamodernism is a way of discussing culture, and metamodernism and music is a popular topic. This essay examines Belle and Sebastian as a metamodern band.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Scarfolk Council

Scarfolk Council | Hauntology | Scoop.it

Thanks to David Pattie for alerting me to this - and it is pure genius.

 

Scarfolk is a town in North West England that did not progress beyond 1979. Instead, the entire decade of the 1970s loops ad infinitum. Here in Scarfolk, pagan rituals blend seamlessly with science; hauntology is a compulsory subject at school, and everyone must be in bed by 8pm because they are perpetually running a slight fever. "Visit Scarfolk today. Our number one priority is keeping rabies at bay." For more information please reread.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Out With the New | on Simon Reynolds and Retromania - The Point Magazine

Out With the New | on Simon Reynolds and Retromania - The Point Magazine | Hauntology | Scoop.it

“The Nineties felt like this long, sustained ascent, what with the Internet and the info-tech boom, techno rave and its associated drugs,” notes Reynolds. “But the 2000s turned out to be a plateau … it seemed like nothing momentous had happened. Worse, it was a struggle to pinpoint what defined the era as a separate era musically.” An intuitive test for this theory is supplied by the tech-philosopher Jaron Lanier in his excellent You Are Not a Gadget (2010). “Popular music created in the industrialized world in the decade from the late 1990s to the late 2000s doesn’t have a distinct style,” he writes, “that is, one that would provide an identity for the young people who grew up with it.” - Ben Jeffery

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

On Vanishing Land [Mark Fisher and Justin Barton] - Simon Reynolds

On Vanishing Land [Mark Fisher and Justin Barton] - Simon Reynolds | Hauntology | Scoop.it

Thanks to David Pattie for alerting me to this:

 

'On Vanishing Land (2013, 45m) is a magisterial audio-essay that evokes a walk undertaken by the artists along the Suffolk coastline in 2005, from Felixstowe container port to the Anglo-Saxon burial ground at Sutton Hoo. Fisher and Barton have conjured a new form of sonic fiction from the dreamings, gleamings and prefigurations that pervade the Suffolk coast. The work includes commissions from digital musicians, interviews and the reflections of the artists. Inspired by the cumulative force of the Eerie that animates this landscape, On Vanishing Landpursues affinities between the modernist reinvention of the ghost story in M.R. James’ Oh, Whistle, And I’ll Come To You, My Lad (1904) and the atmospheric engineering of  Brian Eno’s album On Land (1982). “Themes of incursion - by unnameable forces, geological sentience or temporal anomaly - recur throughout.” (Kodwo Eshun, The Otolith Collective, Curator,  On Vanishing Land)' - Simon Reynolds

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

The Space Library

The Space Library | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'A century of radio waves sent out from Earth have been collected in an imagined music library in outer space.Bringing you retro-futurism with a hint of Hauntology and a focus on electronic experimental pop, library, soundtracks and lounge music for robots.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

pOmoLanD : MeMo: Hope & Change After Cultural Suicide?

pOmoLanD : MeMo: Hope & Change After Cultural Suicide? | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Memo isn't sure ... of a goal to human existence, but in order to get past the destructive 'irony' rooted in egalitarian Nihilism Memo proposes to start moving away from the cliff, pending the discovery of a Sense of Life. Whence and how salvation is about to come is obscure for the moment. But while we wait for it to emerge, the feeling is clothed in Romantic Realism.' - 'Cassandra Troy'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Hacker Farm - UHF

Hacker Farm - UHF | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Hacker Farm have managed to create something that feels genuinely different and odd and exciting for anyone who likes a bit of mystery' - Ian Maleney gets all hauntological on us.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Artpulse Magazine - Beyond Postmodernism. Putting a Face on Metamodernism Without the Easy Clichés - Stephen Knudsen

Artpulse Magazine - Beyond Postmodernism. Putting a Face on Metamodernism Without the Easy Clichés - Stephen Knudsen | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'I will admit, as academia clamors to find some term for “whatever-we-call-coming-after” postmodernism, I long for the days of yore when the nomenclature took little effort ... the opening salvo of post-po-mo circa 1993 is arguably David Foster Wallace’s E Unibus Pluram-a great essay on sensing a cultural sea change, or at least the need for one. Wallace suggested that perhaps what had made postmodernism vital-such as irony, appropriation and obsessive intertextuality-was beginning to fizzle. The suggestion was radical at that time. Wallace’s exquisite prose, his novel Infinite Jest being no exception, pointed to a return to some form of genuine selfhood and authentic, sincere point of view, an attempt to create something on its own right, and what he famously called “single-entendre principles.” Though Wallace’s voice should not be missed in this discussion, one must, however, look elsewhere for fully developed manifestos or sensible new nomenclature identifying the mood change ...

 

I am trying to gain a fondness for the term “metamodernism,” advanced in 2010 by Timotheus Vermeulen and Robin van den Akker in the Journal of Aesthetics & Culture. The theorists use “meta” as a prefix to refer to “between.” Granted, “meta” is more commonnly associated with the idea of “after” or “post,” but that definition would be unhelpful as we have been there and done that. Fortunately, “meta” also can refer to an oscillation between adjacent positions. Organic chemistry adopted that meaning in its use of  “meta” to refer to the occupation of two possible positions, such as the “meta positioning” in the meta benzene ring.' - Stephen Knudsen

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

The Death of Rave/Rave Undead: two panel discussions from CTM.13 – Electronic Beats

The Death of Rave/Rave Undead: two panel discussions from CTM.13 – Electronic Beats | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Since 1999, CTM Festival has been taking place in Berlin concurrently and cooperatively with the transmediale festival of art and digital culture. It brings contemporary electronic and experimental music to the city and has grown to become one of the most anticipated annual events in Europe. Electronic Beats took part in the discourse strand of this year’s festival, and we are pleased to present the audio recordings from one of those now. The Death of Rave was a two-part discussion, conceived and curated by CTM’s Annie Goh, which took place on February 1, 2013, and examined the ‘life’ and ‘death’ the rave phenomena after its 20+ year history in both the UK and Berlin, respectively, and was part of The Death of Rave/Rave Undead  series of day and night-program events at CTM.13.' - Electronic Beats

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

How to Live Without Irony

How to Live Without Irony | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'... To live ironically is to hide in public. It is flagrantly indirect, a form of subterfuge, which means etymologically to “secretly flee” (subter + fuge). Somehow, directness has become unbearable to us.

 

How did this happen? It stems in part from the belief that this generation has little to offer in terms of culture, that everything has already been done, or that serious commitment to any belief will eventually be subsumed by an opposing belief, rendering the first laughable at best and contemptible at worst. This kind of defensive living works as a pre-emptive surrender and takes the form of reaction rather than action ...

 

What would it take to overcome the cultural pull of irony? Moving away from the ironic involves saying what you mean, meaning what you say and considering seriousness and forthrightness as expressive possibilities, despite the inherent risks. It means undertaking the cultivation of sincerity, humility and self-effacement, and demoting the frivolous and the kitschy on our collective scale of values. It might also consist of an honest self-inventory.

 

Here is a start: Look around your living space. Do you surround yourself with things you really like or things you like only because they are absurd? Listen to your own speech. Ask yourself: Do I communicate primarily through inside jokes and pop culture references? What percentage of my speech is meaningful? How much hyperbolic language do I use? Do I feign indifference? Look at your clothes. What parts of your wardrobe could be described as costume-like, derivative or reminiscent of some specific style archetype (the secretary, the hobo, the flapper, yourself as a child)? In other words, do your clothes refer to something else or only to themselves? Do you attempt to look intentionally nerdy, awkward or ugly? In other words, is your style an anti-style? The most important question: How would it feel to change yourself quietly, offline, without public display, from within?' - Christy Wampole

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Eccentronic Research Council - new website

Eccentronic Research Council - new website | Hauntology | Scoop.it

Post 1612 Ghosts using Practical Electronics and all things analogue. Herein lies their thoughts, sounds and news brought to you via a computer linked up to a Ouija board.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Declaration of Liquid Culture | Memetic Turn

'History has not ended – it is liquefying ... Our knowledge is flowing. All that we know about the world is in continuous flow. We adopt our models to the changing world – and not the world to our models. Like our timeline ever renewing, so the data flows into our knowledge and changes our models of the world.' - Joerg Blumtritt, Benedikt Koehler, Sabria David

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Timecode: Hauntology 20 Years On - National Media Museum

Timecode: Hauntology 20 Years On - National Media Museum | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Hauntology 20 Years On is a one-day symposium organised to mark 20 years since the publication of Jacques Derrida's Spectres of Marx. Hauntology defies easy description but embodies the idea of the 'past inside the present' and the border between nostalgia and the enigmatic remoteness of real or constructed pasts. It’s closely connected with certain forms of cinema. The symposium will be accompanied by screenings of hauntological films. The keynote speaker will be cultural theorist Mark Fisher, editor of Capitalist Realism, the K-Punk blog and author of Ghosts of My Life, a forthcoming book on hauntology. Papers will explore Cinematic Hauntology, Sonic Hauntology, Hauntology Online Being and Non-being, Politics, Ideology and Hauntology and The Philosophy of Hauntology.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Metamodernism, Music and Movies: Metamodern Musicals!

Metamodernism, Music and Movies: Metamodern Musicals! | Hauntology | Scoop.it
Metamodernism, Music and Movies - Metamodern Musicals is an essay in comic book form that looks at pop music centered movies as a subgenre of musical cinema.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

the hauntological society;: Ghost Dance - A film by Ken McMullen

the hauntological society;: Ghost Dance - A film by Ken McMullen | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Through the experiences of two women in Paris and London, Ghost Dance offers an analysis of the complexity of our conceptions of ghosts, memory and the past. It is an adventure film strongly influenced by the work of Rivette and Godard but with a unique intellectual and artistic discourse of its own. The film is permeated with phantoms, and also focuses on philosopher Jacques Derrida who considers ghosts to be the memory of something which has never been present. This theory is explored in the film.' - The Hauntological Society

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

The Quietus | Features | Berberian At The Gate: Broadcast & The Death Knell Of Hauntology

The Quietus | Features | Berberian At The Gate: Broadcast & The Death Knell Of Hauntology | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'There's the ontology: a theme either heavy enough to crush poor Belbury Poly and their niche retro pootling, or so banal it could apply to anything. There's the politics: if we're being haunted by post-war social democracy, where do The Caretaker's 1930s ballrooms fit in? There's the awkward fact that memory, nostalgia and the supernatural have always been present in pop – so what's in and what's out?

 

Because the traits touched upon are both too broad and too disparate to be tied up in a word, 'hauntology''s champions end up pulping their subject matter to feed their theory. Like the similarly détourned 'psychogeography', it deadens the senses to the qualities (you'd hope) it was intended to reveal. Both are cases of theory slipping into ersatz theology – fated attempts to capture elusive, unspeakable experiences in yards of self-referential explication guaranteed to stamp out their pleasures. There's nothing wrong with men in their forties enjoying shared tastes and nostalgic triggers, but do they have to be so po-faced about it? Do they really need their peccadilloes underwritten by such a painfully overwritten non-ology?' - Lee Arizuno

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Bury me in paper

Bury me in paper | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Even in the digital age, paper remains the ghost in our machines, the shadow behind every act of hi-tech digital communication. The word-processing document I am typing into and on to has the appearance of a sheet of fresh white paper. In the corner of the screen sits an image of a waste paper basket. There are pages, paragraphs and margins. I will “file” the “document” in a “folder”. Our most cherished new technologies still resemble the page: the iPad is like a jotter; the Kindle like a book; the mobile phone a pocket diary. The paper book is dead, but the story goes on. Long live paper!' - Ian Sansom

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Retromania: Understanding the Power of Cultural Nostalgia | COUNSEL

Retromania: Understanding the Power of Cultural Nostalgia | COUNSEL | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Do you sometimes wonder if anything today is genuinely new or original? Does everything feel like a cover or remix or re-edit or re-release? The fact that so many of today’s most popular products and designs are retro reissues is by no means insignificant ... While a preoccupation with the past is certainly not a new invention, the scale of the current retro obsession reveals much about contemporary fears and aspirations. Driven by a combination of factors from the need for escapism, an ageing population, anxiety about the speed of change and the desire to recreate the material and tangible in an immaterial and digital world.' - Zoe Lazarus

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Albiez
Scoop.it!

Digital Memory and the Archive - Wolfgang Ernst (University of Minnesota Press)

Digital Memory and the Archive - Wolfgang Ernst (University of Minnesota Press) | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Digital Memory and the Archive, the first English-language collection of the German media theorist’s work, brings together essays that present Wolfgang Ernst’s controversial materialist approach to media theory and history. His insights are central to the emerging field of media archaeology, which uncovers the role of specific technologies and mechanisms, rather than content, in shaping contemporary culture and society.' 

more...
No comment yet.