Hauntology
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'Dreamcatcher Tapes'. Ltd edition 7" single | Eccentronic Research Council

'Dreamcatcher Tapes'. Ltd edition 7" single | Eccentronic Research Council | Hauntology | Scoop.it

Hand Made, stamped and numbered super ltd 7" split single, part of the ERC's Dreamcatcher Tapes.

A Side: The Eccentronic Research Council Ft Maxine Peake
AA Side: Pye Corner Audio ft Carol Morley.

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Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas
Curated by Sean Albiez
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In the Company of Ghosts: Hauntology, Ethics, Digital Monsters | Line Henriksen

'According to Derrida, tele-technologies are a good place to explore the disturbances in time and space offered by the ghost and other absent presences. Derrida himself primarily engaged with TV, film and the telephone when discussing hauntology and technology since, as hauntologist Mark Fisher puts it, he did not “live to see the full effects – no doubt I should say the full effects so far – of the ‘tele-technology’ that has most radically contracted time and space, the Internet …” (2012: 19). Fisher himself engages with hauntology in the context of the internet,4 yet primarily through the lens of digital music. In this text, I shall move hauntology and the digital in a different and so far unexplored direction by taking as my guides some of the monsters, ghosts and ghouls that have been created by internet story-telling in recent years. I argue that such guides may help one to think and imagine both the world and ethics differently by exploring the agency of the virtual and the creatures that trouble traditional understandings of what can be said to exist and what cannot. In other words, by following these guides I will map out a hauntological ethics using primarily playful and performative writing to do so. As noted, I will go into more detail with this writing-style in Chapter One, but first: why is a hauntological ethics necessary? Why think with and through monsters and ghosts? And why now?' - Line Henriksen
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Ghosts, Haunting, and Intergenerational Transmission of Affect: From Cryptonymy to Hauntology | Sadeq Rahimi

Ghosts, Haunting, and Intergenerational Transmission of Affect: From Cryptonymy to Hauntology | Sadeq Rahimi | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'This paper addresses the need for a conceptualization of subjectivity capable of releasing subjective experience from its temporal moorings. Emerging theories of ghosts and haunting are discussed as significant developments towards such conceptualization. Two ways of thinking about ghosts and haunting are examined: one that recognizes haunting as a foundational process at the root of human selfhood, and another that recognizes in haunting a pathology and silent suffering in need of healing.' - Sadeq Rahimi

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Acidemic | Film: Hauntology for a De-New America! | Erich Kuersten

Acidemic | Film: Hauntology for a De-New America! | Erich Kuersten | Hauntology | Scoop.it
From 2015 - 'The rise of the retro-analog synth soundtrack in recent horror and science fiction films--both in and out of the mainstream--has brought us into a weird wondrous future alternate reality where perhaps, ideally, orchestral scores will stop. Maybe it's a question of age -- if you were an impressionable American child in 70s then the Carpenter carpets and Goblin pulsing, the sounds of yesterday's vision for the horror future, are now like the mystery of death and eternity tied into some deeper-than-nostalgic tugging, like a rope you're following through the Thing whiteout Arctic storm. But the rope itself is just white noise.' - Erich Kuersten
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On the Haunting of Performance Studies | Benjamin D. Powell & Tracy Stephenson Shaffer | Liminalities: a Journal of Performance Studies

From 2009
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We’re Old and We are F**king Angry: Haunted by Post Post-Punk | Now That's What I Call History blog

We’re Old and We are F**king Angry: Haunted by Post Post-Punk | Now That's What I Call History blog | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Haunting can let go of the old questions about resistance, rejection or celebration of the past because haunting is in itself a form of knowledge. The Haunting, and the haunted, allows the past to trouble the present. For anyone looking back on their lives, let alone on a history of activism and subcultural utopianism, we need to work out what we do with our failures and losses (and our lost dreams). Haunting shows us that they can still work for us now, even from the past, even from our defeats.' - Lucy Robinson
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Belbury Poly - New Album NEW WAYS OUT coming MAY 2016

Belbury Poly - New Album NEW WAYS OUT coming MAY 2016 | Hauntology | Scoop.it
The new album from The Belbury Poly, NEW WAYS OUT coming this May.
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New Ghost Box Release - Hintermass - The Apple Tree

'The Apple Tree is the first LP from Hintermass following their Study Series single for Ghost Box in 2011. The duo comprises Jon Brooks (The Advisory Circle) and Tim Felton (formerly of Broadcast and Seeland).'
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to​ ​rescue​ ​things​ ​beyond​ ​recall by t/e/u/

Originally released as part of Folklore Tapes' Lancashire Folklore Tapes IV - Memories of Hurstwood​. 30x Hard Back Cassette Books & 60x Envelope Edition. Each edition comes with a fragment of wall from Extwistle Hall and D/L. Presented here in the form of an alternative mix and master. Recorded,​ ​edited​ ​and arranged​ ​in 2015. Analog master, transferred to​ ​24​ ​bit Wav​ ​by​ ​Optimum Mastering,​ ​2016.
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Projections on a Wall: A Hauntology - Frank Garrett

Projections on a Wall: A Hauntology - Frank Garrett | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'History erupts in sometimes disturbing ways in the palimpsest that is present-day Berlin. You can’t just focus on one time period when you visit the city. Today’s Berlin opens up within a hall of mirrors that reflects and refracts all those other Berlins. To speak about the Berlin of the past 26 years requires the vocabulary of the Cold War. You find that this discourse still operates within the semiotics of the murderous Third Reich, utilising the grammar of the First World War as inflected in the vernacular of Expressionism. Prussian imperialism provides the city’s basic syntax. One nonetheless must be fluent in history, then, before attempting to read Berlin.' - Frank Garrett

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David Bowie's Hauntology - Steen Christiansen

From 2008 -Paper presented at Uncanny Media, Utrecht, Netherlands.

 

'David Bowie's now-defunct rock-opera trilogy's first instalment 1. Outside is filled with uncanny mediations of rock music's chameleon. The inner sleeve booklet is titled The Diary of Nathan Adler, or the Ritual Art-Murder of Baby Grace Blue: A non-linear Gothic Drama Hyper-Cycle. Behind this long-winded title, is the story of a murder, narrated by several characters through both text, music and images.

 

Bowie, however, is the narrator of all these different voices, using technology to distort his voice into these different characters as separate entities. His voice and presence haunts the entire album in uncanny forms, just as all images in the booklet are distorted images of Bowie himself, made into uncanny doubles. The story begins with the murder of Baby Grace Blue, who is enacted by Bowie himself. Symbolically, Bowie is murdered by himself, while Baby Grace haunts the entire album's Gothic and labyrinthine structure.' - Steen Christiansen

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the hauntological society: Oliver Postgate & Peter Firmin's The Pogles/Pogles' Wood

the hauntological society: Oliver Postgate & Peter Firmin's The Pogles/Pogles' Wood | Hauntology | Scoop.it

In The Pogles, Mr and Mrs Pogle were a homely couple living quietly in a tree root until the day Mr Pogle found a magic bean which, when planted, became a huge talking plant fond of bilberry wine. When the baby son of the Fairy King appeared in the branches of the plant it was up to the Pogles to protect him from a beak-nosed old witch.

"The first Pogles was a single one I made intending to do a series, but, quite rightly, the BBC said it was too frightening cos the witch was a proper witch, and they said witches are alright in fairyland and places like that, but not in the back garden" — Oliver Postgate

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forestpunk review - Model Cities & Haunted Dischoteques, Logotones & Deep Space Drones: In A Moment - Ghost Box 10 Year Anniversary

forestpunk review - Model Cities & Haunted Dischoteques, Logotones & Deep Space Drones: In A Moment - Ghost Box 10 Year Anniversary | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Hauntology is, simply put, “the past inside the present”. The aesthetic movement involved retro-worshipping pastiche, nostalgia, memory, and childhood dreamstates, in one confusing kaleidoscopic tilt-o-whirl. Ghost Box’s creators goal, with the label, was to reference a very particular period of British culture, from roughly 1960 to 1970. Jim Jupp & Julian House were calling upon a kind of folk memory of a particular age bracket of Britons, creating a mythical town square where likeminded freakniks could gather on gush over title sequences and vintage gear.

 

Hauntology perhaps raised more ire than any other internet-fueled genre, with many journalists finding it pretentious, with its Marxist underpinnings and Critical Theory lexicon. Perhaps even worse, some find hauntology to be “nostalgic”, examples of a decadent society. There’s nothing left to do, man, nothing left to say. Nothing can be seen that isn’t shown.

 

It is, perhaps, to Ghost Box’s credit, and telling of the state of our current that Ghost Box are here to herald their 10th anniversary (in typical atemporal fashion, in their 11th year). Because Ghost Box had their finger on the trigger of a number of societal ailments, and possible cures – most notably, the death of the music industry and of creativity.

 

Because, you see, hauntology references the past inside the present. It references the media we see and watch and share and remember, and re-creates those sensations in uncanny new shapes. It’s a bricolage from the yellowed shards of yesterday, spun into funky tinsels of tinny beats and far-out organs, modern day head records, for heads and by heads.' - forestpunk

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Electronic Sound Magazine (Issue 16) - Ghost Box Records Interview

Electronic Sound Magazine (Issue 16) - Ghost Box Records Interview | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Often referred to as a modernday Factory Records, Jim Jupp and Julian House’s retro-referencing, forward-looking Sussex-based label, celebrates its 10th anniversary – and they’ve given us a rare interview.' - CARL GRIFFIN

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Zeit Online | Hauntology-Pop: Elektronische Musik erforscht ihr Unbewusstes | Felix Stephan

Zeit Online | Hauntology-Pop: Elektronische Musik erforscht ihr Unbewusstes | Felix Stephan | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Derridas Begriff der "Hauntology" in den Clubs: Eine junge Musikergeneration erinnert sich an eine Kindheit vor der Spielekonsole und erwärmt Techno mit Menschlichkeit.' - Felix Stephan

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The Alphabet of Hauntology | Olga Drenda | Czas Kultury

The Alphabet of Hauntology | Olga Drenda | Czas Kultury | Hauntology | Scoop.it
From 2013 - 'What comprises a spectral, music-related genre such as hauntology? The list presented below is an attempt to pinpoint the most essential ingredients of this nebulous phenomenon, to catalogue its most significant representatives and indicate its affinities with other genres – both in music and in other creative fields.' - Olga Drenda
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Faith in the Ghosts of Literature. Poetic Hauntology in Derrida, Blanchot and Morrison’s Beloved

Faith in the Ghosts of Literature. Poetic Hauntology in Derrida, Blanchot and Morrison’s Beloved | Hauntology | Scoop.it

From 2013 - 'Literature, this paper argues, is a privileged language that can give form to those specters of existence that resist the traditional ontological boundaries of being and non-being, alive and dead. This I describe as the “hauntology” of literature. Literature, unlike our everyday, referential language, is not obliged to refer to a determinable reality, or to sustain meaning. It can therefore be viewed as a negation of the world of things and sensible phenomena. Yet it gives us access to vivid and sensory rich worlds. The status of this literary world, then, is strangely in-between; its ontology is not present and fixed, but rather quivering or ghostlike. The “I” that speaks in a literary text never coincides with the “I” of the writing subject, rather they haunt each other. This theoretical understanding is based on texts by Jacques Derrida and Maurice Blanchot. The paper also draws an analogy between this spectral dynamic of literature and an understanding of religious faith or belief. Belief relates to that which cannot be ontologically fixed or verified, be it God, angels, or spirits. Literature, because it releases and sustains this ontological quivering, can transmit the ineffable, the repressed and transcendent. With this starting point, I turn to Toni Morrison’s book Beloved (1987) and to Beloved’s strange, spectral monologue. By giving literary voice to the dead, Morrison releases literature’s hauntology to express the horror that history books cannot convey, and that our memory struggles to contain.' - Elisabeth M. Loevlie

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Hauntology Of The Dead Past (1965) – Out Of The Unknown.

Hauntology Of The Dead Past (1965) – Out Of The Unknown. | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'The BBC Science-Fiction anthology series, Out Of The Unknown (1965-1970), was famous for producing a wide range of intellectual sci-fi drama, exploring ideas and concepts more than spectacle and scale. With adaptations from a range of writers, including John Wyndham and J.G. Ballard, the surviving episodes of the series are both stimulating and useful in terms of 21st century aesthetic philosophy. The feeling that the episodes are discussing a number of, still relevant, issues is one that haunts, especially as the series is coming close to fifty years old (as well as the original stories themselves being even older). On watching an episode from its first series recently, The Dead Past (1965), whilst at the same time reading ideas surrounding the theory of hauntology by the writer, Mark Fisher, (Specifically Ghosts Of My Life, 2014, Zero Books) the two works seemed to connect and were clearly discussing ideas along the same lines.' - Adam Scovell
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Visiting Scarfolk, the Most Spectacular Dystopia of the 1970s - Collectors Weekly

Visiting Scarfolk, the Most Spectacular Dystopia of the 1970s - Collectors Weekly | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The term most often applied to Scarfolk is hauntology, which I hadn’t heard of before I started Scarfolk. Hauntology plays in part with the idea developed by Jacques Derrida (via Karl Marx) of the specter of communism haunting Europe after its demise, but it has become something a bit different in popular culture. It recycles aesthetic forms and reflects the clash between the dreams we had of the future in the 1960s through the 1980s versus where we actually are now. But it also looks back, as did 1970s culture, to earlier periods, like pre-Christian paganism and Victoriana, for example.' - Richard Littler

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Ghostly Sightings: hauntology and spectrality in East Asian gothic cinema - Durham University

Ghostly Sightings: hauntology and spectrality in East Asian gothic cinema - Durham University | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Drawing on the figure of the ghost in Japanese, South Korean, Chinese, Hong Kong and Taiwanese cinema and the work of Derrida on hauntology, this lecture will explore how spectral haunting pushes the limits of Western understanding about East Asia while at the same time allows us insights into how [official] history manipulates and erases identities in the process of modern nation making. This nation building is on one hand an act of commodification in relation to the West whose nostalgic desire for a ‘traditional’ East, the East is more than happy to provide, while on the other hand provides a mechanism through which to disavow past atrocities, committed by both East and West. It is through speaking with ghosts that we can acknowledge our own complicity with such nostalgic and touristic representations of the ‘East’'.

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HERESY RECORDS - ROGER DOYLE – TIME MACHINE

HERESY RECORDS - ROGER DOYLE – TIME MACHINE | Hauntology | Scoop.it

In Time Machine [Roger Doyle] brings us his most personal record to date. The album centers on a series of answering machine messages of Doyle’s family, close friends, colleagues and lovers, all of them recorded in and preserved from the late 1980’s.

This haunting spectral and deeply emotional meditation on the passing and creating of life is both nostalgic and powerfully of the moment. Faithful companions and family members have tragically died, children have grown to adults and new life has been born. Time Machine intermingles sadness, melancholy, joy and triumph in a manner that makes this one of the most poignant releases of 2015. - Heresy Records

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Joseph Curwen - The Temple

Later incidents are chaotic. As I stared at the uncannily lighted door and windows, I became subject to the most extravagant visions - visions so extravagant that I cannot even relate them. I fancied that I discerned objects in the temple; objects both stationary and moving; and seemed to hear again the unreal chant that had floated to me when first I awaked. And over all rose thoughts and fears which centered in the youth from the sea and the ivory image whose carving was duplicated on the frieze and columns of the temple before me." 

"Newcastle’s hauntological master of drones" - The Quietus 

HP Lovecraft inspired Post-Rave Hauntology Rituals and Radiophonic Occult Synth Horror Soundtracks, from Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England. 

All digital noise intended. 

Thank you for listening. 

Produced & Mastered September 2015, North East Weird Noises.

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Ghost Box Records at 10 - "Not just a record label but an imaginary world" - Getintothis

Ghost Box Records at 10 - "Not just a record label but an imaginary world" - Getintothis | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Ghost Box have taken advantage of building upon the natural and startlingly iniquitous pathways often furrowed for family television and education from this period. This was the era of ultra-violent public information films, of educational Radiophonic records with morbid, bleak poetry, and constant spurts of horror in television such asDoctor Who (1963-1989), Children Of The Stones (1977), The Tomorrow People (1973), and The Owl Service (1969). The populism of magic(k) and esoterica seems, in hindsight, to have found its way into almost every possible form, from boxes of Sainsbury’s Corn Flakes resembling Summerisle suns to Play School presenters releasing pagan folk records.' - Paul Higham

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Accelerationism Without Accelerationism - Steven Shaviro (book review)

Steven Shaviro's review of Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work (by Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams)

 

'The greatest strength of Inventing the Future, to my mind, is that it does indeed turn our attention towards the future, instead of the past. A big problem for the left today is that we have too long been stuck in the backward-looking, defensive project of trying to rescue whatever might be left of the mid-twentieth-century welfare state. While it is perfectly reasonable to lament our loss of the safety net that was provided by mid-twentieth-century social democracy, the restoration of those benefits is not enough to fuel a radical economic and political program. Looking nostalgically towards the past is far too deeply ingrained in our habits of thought. We need to reclaim our sense of the future from Silicon Valley and Hollywood. As Srnicek and Williams put it at the very end of their book,

 

"Rather than settling for marginal improvements in battery life and computing power, the left should mobilise dreams of decarbonising the economy, space travel, robot economies – all the traditional touchstones of science fiction – in order to prepare for a day beyond capitalism."

 

Post-capitalism (or better, communism – to use another word that is absent from this book) today has only a science fictional status. It’s a hidden potentiality that somehow still manages – just barely – to haunt the neoliberal endless present. Our rulers have been unable to exorcise this potential completely; but thus far we have been equally unable to endow it with any sort of substantiality or persistence. Inventing the Future looks beyond this impasse, to extrapolate (as all good science fiction does) a future that might actually be livable. This is its virtue and its importance.' - Steven Shaviro

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