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BBC Four - Dreaming the Impossible: Unbuilt Britain

BBC Four - Dreaming the Impossible: Unbuilt Britain | Hauntology | Scoop.it
The fascinating and dramatic stories behind some of the grandest designs never built.
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Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas
Curated by Sean Albiez
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Dispatches: London | Frieze | Juliet Jacques

Dispatches: London | Frieze | Juliet Jacques | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'One week after the election result was announced, I went to a gathering that Laura Oldfield Ford had organized. I hadn’t seen Laura since the memorial event for Mark Fisher in February, when we had agreed that those of us who had coalesced through the blogging circle around k-punk, or Zero/Repeater Books should meet more often. With so many emotions flying around, and so many variables at play, it was impossible to guess what Mark would have made of the preceding seven days, in which the end of capitalist realism began to feel not just possible but almost inevitable. In truth, I have no idea which way things are going to fall, but being part of a more confident alliance of politicians, activists, artists and writers, I feel for the first time in my life that it might be possible to push this city – and this country – back towards the left.' - Juliet Jacques
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Ether Signposts #27/52a: Further Signals From A Julian House Archive | A Year In The Country

Ether Signposts #27/52a: Further Signals From A Julian House Archive | A Year In The Country | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'I’ve briefly mentioned the The House Of Julian Flikr group that collects Julian House’s artwork and design work before… Though I don’t visit it all that often (it’s not actually updated all that often, which I quite like as you’re not running to catch up with it) but it’s always a treat to do so when I do… …and I thought it would be good to revisit around these parts… I think it’s probably the best display/collection of his work that I have come across and includes his work for the Ghost Box Records label he co-founded with Jim Jupp, interconnected work with/for Broadcast, his design work for clients via Intro (book covers, records etc) and some exhibition work and photographs.' - A Year in the Country
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Dungeons Deep, Forests Dark - A beginner's guide to Dungeon Synth | Dirge Magazine

Dungeons Deep, Forests Dark - A beginner's guide to Dungeon Synth | Dirge Magazine | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'... Dungeon Synth is wrapped in multiple layers of the past, pulling a hauntological cloak about itself and gaining a glamour which appeals very strongly to a certain kind of person (myself included). The thematic obsession of Dungeon Synth is almost always that of ancient times, even if they are sometimes an ancient future, that aligns with reality but dips very heavily into fantasy.' - Daniel Pietersen
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Faded Ghost - Lunatic Romance

'A leading light of Shanghai’s musical underground for years, RBMA alumni ChaCha presents ‘Moon Mad’, her first album as Faded Ghost. Not only in name does Faded Ghost immediately call up associations with hauntology – the album revels in the kind of nostalgia for lost futures pioneered musically by Burial in the early 2000s.'
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Folk Horror Curios | Adam Covell

Folk Horror Curios | Adam Covell | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'As typical when finishing a book that attempts to build a canon, as I have tried to do with Folk Horror, the signalling of its publishing means a whole host of new potential examples surface and come to light. Though there were things in the Folk Horror book that I simply left out by sheer chance – Edgar Wright’s Hot Fuzz (2007) being a key example – others have only been viewed or pointed out to me since publication. With this in mind, I wanted to highlight a few of the best which, undoubtedly, would have been in the book if viewed earlier.' - Adam Covell

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The Quietus | Review | Radiophonic Workshop 'Burials in Several Earths'

The Quietus | Review | Radiophonic Workshop 'Burials in Several Earths' | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'The lovingly rendered packaging for Burials in Several Earths very much plays up to the Workshop's influence as indirect progenitors of hauntological tendencies within strands of musical and cultural thinking throughout the 21st century thus far. Houses crumble under swirls of murky vortices and analogue synthesisers wash up as flotsam amongst wrecked ships on rocky shores. Yet, for all the imagery of one era's decay superimposed upon another, the music chimes with clarity and freshness reminiscent of Cluster at their most benevolently aqueous and formless.' - Euan Andrews
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A Year In The Country | ‘The Restless Field’ reviewed

A Year In The Country | ‘The Restless Field’ reviewed | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'The strain of fact, fiction, and myth that we know as Folk Horror has a powerful sense of place. The stories of M.R. James, the myths and folklore of Romance-era England, Nigel Kneale’s nerve-shredding The Stone Tape or more recent efforts like the BBC’s The Living And The Dead don’t just share an atmosphere of bucolic dread. They’re based around specific places, around the idea that the land remembers events that happen in and around it, or if you like, Hauntology.

The Restless Field, a beautifully curated and packaged collection of tracks inspired by various English fields and events that took place in them throughout history, might as well be called The Grass Tape. It’s the first of this year’s releases from the A Year In The Country project, and it’s a bewitching soup of ancient-sounding folk, eerie reels, drones, found sounds, and electronica assembled by various artists.' - Martin Ruddock
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White Tears | Hari Kunzru | Book Review | The Guardian

White Tears | Hari Kunzru | Book Review | The Guardian | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Twitter-deft at pithy compression (Seth laments his “disabling caucasity”), Kunzru is especially good at evoking the psychological interzone between pre- and post-internet life, at one stage channelling the “hauntological” work of cultural theorist Mark Fisher by having Seth ruminate: “When did I lose touch with the future? I remember how imminent it used to feel, how exciting. The old world was dissolving, all the grime of the past sluicing away in digital rain.” 

White Tears also brings to mind the sociologist Avery Gordon who, in Ghostly Matters (1997), describes haunting as “putting life back in where only a vague memory or a bare trace was visible … It is sometimes about writing ghost stories, stories that not only repair representational mistakes, but also strive to understand the conditions under which a memory was produced in the first place”.' - Sukhdev Sandhu
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Cults, human sacrifice and pagan sex: how folk horror is flowering again in Brexit Britain | The Guardian

Cults, human sacrifice and pagan sex: how folk horror is flowering again in Brexit Britain | The Guardian | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Folk horror, which is the subject of a new season at the Barbican, presents the dark dreams Britain has of itself. The films pick up on folk’s association with the tribal and the rooted. And our tribe turns out to be a savage one: the countryside harbours forgotten cruelties, with the old ways untouched by modernity and marked by half-remembered rituals.' - Michael Newton
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REQUIEM FOR THE SIMULATION GENERATION | Harrison Fannon

REQUIEM FOR THE SIMULATION GENERATION | Harrison Fannon | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'We seem to pine for a realness that exists in the materiality of the past. Indeed, it can be seen in modern popular culture, which appears to be locked in a state of retrospection, heavily relying on the reproduction of styles and forms of previous times. Music critic Simon Reynolds in his book Retromania, points to the success of the nostalgia industry with its revivals, reunions and remakes to claim that there has never been a culture so obsessed with its own immediate past. It’s as if a feeling of displacement in the digital age has triggered a nostalgic yearning for our analogue history. A history in which authenticity was concealed within the granulated haze of a film photograph, or the quintessential crackle of the needle falling on a record. A past that challenged the sleek, logical and mass-produced modernist aesthetic with a sense of character that is idiosyncratic and perceivably vulnerable to the processes of nature. An ideal of beauty more attuned to the imperfection and impermanence of our own human condition.' - Harrison Fannon
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The Truth is Scary: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Jacques Derrida’s Hauntology, and Museum Theory in the Battle between “Real” and “Fake” | Graphite Publications

The Truth is Scary: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Jacques Derrida’s Hauntology, and Museum Theory in the Battle between “Real” and “Fake” | Graphite Publications | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'UQAM professor Josette Feral ... argues that the modern museum is a “dead space” in which the “real” narratives of history can be found lurking in and around its exhibitions like ghosts. In other words, she implies that ghosts come in the form of false narratives, and that they can surely be found haunting the halls of our favorite museums. However, through the use of Jacques Derrida’s philosophy, we can see that this space is not merely “dead,” but “undead;” coming to fruition through the ghosts that meld their way into the cleavage between fiction and non-fiction – truth and not truth – in museums in terms of linear time and historical narrative.' - Olivia Maccioni
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Jon Brooks - Autres Directions | Review

Jon Brooks - Autres Directions | Review | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'The use of field recordings that capture distant voices inside a revolving 5 note synth wash on the title track manages the very difficult trick of being both very simple whilst entrancing the listener into a kaleidoscopic reverie of flashbacks entirely sourced from one's own memory banks - hauntology par excellence.It's final cluster of hazy, unintelligible voices close out the first side of the record in a strong and strangely cinematic fashion.' - Shaun C. Rogan
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all hold hands and off we go, by Keith Seatman

'all hold hands and off we go is the 5th album of strange Electronics, Psych, Radiophonics, Drone and quirky Folk by Keith Seatman.
As on his previous release (A Rest Before the Walk) Keith re-unites
with North Devon Singer/Songwriter Douglas E Powell for two tracks
mr metronome and boxes with rhythms in. 


CD and Digital download from Bandcamp'

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Robin Hardy, The Wicker Man and Folk Horror | James Gent / We Are Cult

Robin Hardy, The Wicker Man and Folk Horror | James Gent / We Are Cult | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Everything you see in the film is absolutely authentic. The whole series of ceremonies and details that we show have happened at different times and places in Britain and western Europe. What we did was to bring them all together in one particular time and place. The wicker man itself is quite real. The Druids used the structure to burn their sacrificial victims. What we hoped would fascinate people is not that they would think these things are still going on in Europe, but that they would recognise an awful lot of these things as sort of little echoes from either out of childhood stories and nursery rhymes or things they do at various times of the year. There are so many Christian holidays that are celebrated where there was previously a pagan feast. Easter is one of them, originally it was a hare feast. At Christmas, you set up a Christmas tree because that was what the goddess Hera worshipped. Mistletoe is purely Druidic – it relates to the Golden Bough. My God, when you decorate your home for Christmas you are using nearly every pagan symbol there is!' - Robin Hardy

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The Unquiet Meadow | Asheville FM

The Unquiet Meadow | Asheville FM | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Experimental/Atmospheric/Acid/Spook/Baroque-Folk/Psychedelia… Join Cyprian & Pryscilla as they guide you through psych-tinged landscapes of mutated folk & haunted electronica.'

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Firewarps | Ceylan Göksel

'This piece is composed with my field recordings, digitally altered, reversed and transposed sounds, the introduction part of Alice Coltrane's "The Sun", with influences of Air's "Le Soleil Est Près De Moi" and Jean-Michel Jarre's "Oxygène Pt. 1".'
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Modern Kosmology, by Jane Weaver


Modern Kosmology by Jane Weaver, released 19 May 2017

1. H>A>K
2. Did You See Butterflies?
3. Modern Kosmology
4. Slow Motion
5. Loops In The Secret Society
6. The Architect
7. The Lightning Back
8. Valley
9. Ravenspoint
10. I Wish

"Epic kraut-pop opera teeming with motorik rhythms and analogue synths.” NPR

“A mind-expanding delight, devoid of retro posturing.” Guardian

“Sparkling strangeness from one-woman genre-buster..superb.” Uncut

“Intoxicating space-rock.” MOJO


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Accelerationism: how a fringe philosophy predicted the future we live in | Andy Beckett | The Guardian

Accelerationism: how a fringe philosophy predicted the future we live in | Andy Beckett | The Guardian | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Accelerationists argue that technology, particularly computer technology, and capitalism, particularly the most aggressive, global variety, should be massively sped up and intensified – either because this is the best way forward for humanity, or because there is no alternative. Accelerationists favour automation. They favour the further merging of the digital and the human. They often favour the deregulation of business, and drastically scaled-back government. They believe that people should stop deluding themselves that economic and technological progress can be controlled. They often believe that social and political upheaval has a value in itself.' - Andy Beckett
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Ghost Box | Fortean Times

Ghost Box | Fortean Times | Hauntology | Scoop.it
The new edition of Fortean Times (FT354 June) with feature article by Bob Fischer, "The Haunted Generation": Weird 70s TV & its influence on Ghost Box, Clay Pipe Music, Trunk, Moon Wiring Club & Scarfolk
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Folk horror as speculative sociology | Modern Mythology | John Ohno

Folk horror as speculative sociology | Modern Mythology | John Ohno | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Folk horror is having a Renaissance, as the novelty cycle revisits the seventies at two iterations’ remove & the SF community starts again to seriously analyze the dialogue between the weird and the hauntological. The spring season, with Easter, Walpurgisnacht, and May Day, is a good time to revisit this, and, as expected, various publications have — not just the usual suspects like Scarfolk, but also The Guardian, which published a piece whose analysis I’d like to pick apart a bit.


Newton’s analysis suggests a rural versus urban dimension (and, by extension, a modernity versus tradition dimension), and while this exists in the text, I consider it shallow. I’d like instead to argue that, rather than being in the tradition of gothic and romantic horror, folk horror has more in common with the point at which weird fiction intersects with science fiction.' - John Ohno

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The Quietus | Features | Vanishing: Where Is The Music Of The Impending Apocalypse? | John Doran

The Quietus | Features | Vanishing: Where Is The Music Of The Impending Apocalypse? | John Doran | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Most other modern genres pale in comparison to metal in the apocalypse stakes. Some producers of noise, techno and dark ambient talk a good Omega game but the lack of lyrical content makes this little more than a colouring agent in my book. Elsewhere, I can detect a subtle millenarian undercurrent to hauntology - probably because of the shaded section on the Venn Diagram that crosses over into Protect And Survive booklets, public information films, Threads and so on. I asked Simon Reynolds if he believed these hauntological fetishes were totally removed from modern day worries about nuclear war: “I don’t think it’s to do with apocalypse or nostalgia for nuclear war or anything daft like that, it’s an aesthetic thing – [people] love of the look and sound of those Public Information Films as little capsules from another time. There’s also a sense of wonder that such creepy, unnerving things were shown to children.” 

And even then, when we put our heads together my initial assumption that there would be untold numbers of hauntological recordings about impending doom seem to be somewhat fanciful. There is the ‘Civil Defence Is Common Sense’ track on The Advisory Circle’s Other Channels album and the nuclear war inspired Tomorrow’s Harvest by Boards Of Canada (again, as much as an instrumental album can be said to be about anything).' - John Doran
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THE FISHER-FUNCTION | VISUAL CULTURES PUBLIC PROGRAMME GOLDSMITHS, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

THE FISHER-FUNCTION | VISUAL CULTURES PUBLIC PROGRAMME  GOLDSMITHS, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The Fisher-Function is a seven week series focused solely on the work of Mark Fisher. Instead of taking the traditional lecture format, The F-F will take the form of collective reading and listening sessions, all open to anyone interested - inside and outside of Goldsmiths, whether you know Mark's work or not.'

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Vanishing Point: How the Light Grid Defined 1980s Futurism | Richard McKenna

Vanishing Point: How the Light Grid Defined 1980s Futurism | Richard McKenna | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Of all the visual shorthand for a particular type of outmoded futurism, one of the most immediately recognizable—like the chrome lettering with which it is often paired—must be the light grid. Usually depicted as a network of glowing straight lines receding in perspective against a black background, occasionally with the outlines of mountains or the blush of dawn visible on the horizon, the light grid (or laser grid, or neon grid) today is in widespread use as the appropriated expression of a perceived aesthetic, a tongue-in-cheek signifier of the naïve dreams of Generation X. It is hard to believe that it once communicated such a potent sense of transformation and possibility, but it did just that. As rocket-fin styling symbolizes the sleek and innocent aspirations of the 1950s, the grid is now the symbol par excellence of “The Eighties,” a now-mythological time when a cocktail of affluence, Cold War tensions, and the encroaching power of computing combined to confer upon the dreamers of the West a form as memorable as it was ephemeral.' - Richard McKenna
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Igloo Magazine :: Snufmumriko :: At First Light (Shimmering Moods) | Igloo Magazine

Igloo Magazine :: Snufmumriko :: At First Light (Shimmering Moods) | Igloo Magazine | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'At First Light is a subtle invitation to navigate through cloudy, frosty, fragile, subjective and impressionistic soundscapes with a fancy for turntablism and hauntology (due to the presence of fractured ghostly loops, reverbed sounding memories and sampled field recordings). Beautiful electronic treatments oscillate with soothing, flowing, grainy concrete sounds and timbral acoustic motifs. Nothing intrusive but delicately relaxing, introspective and evocative.' - Philippe Blache
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Vaporwave: The Musical Wallpaper of Lost Futures | CCCB LAB

Vaporwave: The Musical Wallpaper of Lost Futures | CCCB LAB | Hauntology | Scoop.it

Half a decade after it first appeared, we take stock of this internet-based music genre and explore its critique of consumer culture.' - Arnau Horta

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