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A Living Sermon: OST BBC Records Special - Robin The Fog

A Living Sermon: OST BBC Records Special - Robin The Fog | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'It is with great pleasure that I hereby present the podcast of last Saturday’s edition of OST on Resonance FM, a two-hour special devoted to the many faces of BBC Records, compiled and presented by myself in my capacity as the corporation’s ‘Resident Hauntologist’. 

 

I’ve tried to steer clear of anything instantly recognisable, but there’s some truly fabulous stuff buried in this mix – songs, voices, sound effects, girl guides, home movie musics, steam trains in stereo, church bells (not an entire LP’s worth, though I could have easily managed it!), hi-fi maintenance tips, how to offer someone fruit in German, and of course a generous portion of Radiophonic nuggets, some of which will hopefully come as a surprise. It’s sometimes hard to believe just what a wide variety of weird and wonderful things BBC Records were putting out in its 60s and 70s heyday; and harder still to believe that any label could be responsible for both Keith Harris and Orville and ‘Sounds Of Death and Horror’. Then again, perhaps it’s not so hard after all…' - Robin The Fog

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Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas
Curated by Sean Albiez
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The Quietus | Review | Radiophonic Workshop 'Burials in Several Earths'

The Quietus | Review | Radiophonic Workshop 'Burials in Several Earths' | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'The lovingly rendered packaging for Burials in Several Earths very much plays up to the Workshop's influence as indirect progenitors of hauntological tendencies within strands of musical and cultural thinking throughout the 21st century thus far. Houses crumble under swirls of murky vortices and analogue synthesisers wash up as flotsam amongst wrecked ships on rocky shores. Yet, for all the imagery of one era's decay superimposed upon another, the music chimes with clarity and freshness reminiscent of Cluster at their most benevolently aqueous and formless.' - Euan Andrews
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A Year In The Country | ‘The Restless Field’ reviewed

A Year In The Country | ‘The Restless Field’ reviewed | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'The strain of fact, fiction, and myth that we know as Folk Horror has a powerful sense of place. The stories of M.R. James, the myths and folklore of Romance-era England, Nigel Kneale’s nerve-shredding The Stone Tape or more recent efforts like the BBC’s The Living And The Dead don’t just share an atmosphere of bucolic dread. They’re based around specific places, around the idea that the land remembers events that happen in and around it, or if you like, Hauntology.

The Restless Field, a beautifully curated and packaged collection of tracks inspired by various English fields and events that took place in them throughout history, might as well be called The Grass Tape. It’s the first of this year’s releases from the A Year In The Country project, and it’s a bewitching soup of ancient-sounding folk, eerie reels, drones, found sounds, and electronica assembled by various artists.' - Martin Ruddock
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White Tears | Hari Kunzru | Book Review | The Guardian

White Tears | Hari Kunzru | Book Review | The Guardian | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Twitter-deft at pithy compression (Seth laments his “disabling caucasity”), Kunzru is especially good at evoking the psychological interzone between pre- and post-internet life, at one stage channelling the “hauntological” work of cultural theorist Mark Fisher by having Seth ruminate: “When did I lose touch with the future? I remember how imminent it used to feel, how exciting. The old world was dissolving, all the grime of the past sluicing away in digital rain.” 

White Tears also brings to mind the sociologist Avery Gordon who, in Ghostly Matters (1997), describes haunting as “putting life back in where only a vague memory or a bare trace was visible … It is sometimes about writing ghost stories, stories that not only repair representational mistakes, but also strive to understand the conditions under which a memory was produced in the first place”.' - Sukhdev Sandhu
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Cults, human sacrifice and pagan sex: how folk horror is flowering again in Brexit Britain | The Guardian

Cults, human sacrifice and pagan sex: how folk horror is flowering again in Brexit Britain | The Guardian | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Folk horror, which is the subject of a new season at the Barbican, presents the dark dreams Britain has of itself. The films pick up on folk’s association with the tribal and the rooted. And our tribe turns out to be a savage one: the countryside harbours forgotten cruelties, with the old ways untouched by modernity and marked by half-remembered rituals.' - Michael Newton
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REQUIEM FOR THE SIMULATION GENERATION | Harrison Fannon

REQUIEM FOR THE SIMULATION GENERATION | Harrison Fannon | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'We seem to pine for a realness that exists in the materiality of the past. Indeed, it can be seen in modern popular culture, which appears to be locked in a state of retrospection, heavily relying on the reproduction of styles and forms of previous times. Music critic Simon Reynolds in his book Retromania, points to the success of the nostalgia industry with its revivals, reunions and remakes to claim that there has never been a culture so obsessed with its own immediate past. It’s as if a feeling of displacement in the digital age has triggered a nostalgic yearning for our analogue history. A history in which authenticity was concealed within the granulated haze of a film photograph, or the quintessential crackle of the needle falling on a record. A past that challenged the sleek, logical and mass-produced modernist aesthetic with a sense of character that is idiosyncratic and perceivably vulnerable to the processes of nature. An ideal of beauty more attuned to the imperfection and impermanence of our own human condition.' - Harrison Fannon
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The Truth is Scary: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Jacques Derrida’s Hauntology, and Museum Theory in the Battle between “Real” and “Fake” | Graphite Publications

The Truth is Scary: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Jacques Derrida’s Hauntology, and Museum Theory in the Battle between “Real” and “Fake” | Graphite Publications | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'UQAM professor Josette Feral ... argues that the modern museum is a “dead space” in which the “real” narratives of history can be found lurking in and around its exhibitions like ghosts. In other words, she implies that ghosts come in the form of false narratives, and that they can surely be found haunting the halls of our favorite museums. However, through the use of Jacques Derrida’s philosophy, we can see that this space is not merely “dead,” but “undead;” coming to fruition through the ghosts that meld their way into the cleavage between fiction and non-fiction – truth and not truth – in museums in terms of linear time and historical narrative.' - Olivia Maccioni
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Jon Brooks - Autres Directions | Review

Jon Brooks - Autres Directions | Review | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'The use of field recordings that capture distant voices inside a revolving 5 note synth wash on the title track manages the very difficult trick of being both very simple whilst entrancing the listener into a kaleidoscopic reverie of flashbacks entirely sourced from one's own memory banks - hauntology par excellence.It's final cluster of hazy, unintelligible voices close out the first side of the record in a strong and strangely cinematic fashion.' - Shaun C. Rogan
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all hold hands and off we go, by Keith Seatman

'all hold hands and off we go is the 5th album of strange Electronics, Psych, Radiophonics, Drone and quirky Folk by Keith Seatman.
As on his previous release (A Rest Before the Walk) Keith re-unites
with North Devon Singer/Songwriter Douglas E Powell for two tracks
mr metronome and boxes with rhythms in. 


CD and Digital download from Bandcamp'

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Uncanny Others: Hauntology, Ethnography, Media | Carrie Clanton

'This thesis presents my study of “ghosthunting”—the practice of attempting to capture ghosts, primarily using cameras and audio recorders—as a metaphorical device for the use of audio-visual media within anthropology. I conducted fieldwork with ghosthunters, paying particular attention to their attendant audio-visual media practices and outputs, in order to redress the reluctance of anthropology to a) evaluate audio and visual media as mechanisms for producing anthropological critique—although some anthropologists have taken pains to do that with writing—and b) to understand the particular "haunted" history of audio-visual media as being related to critical anthropological concerns such as representation, time, and the other. 


The history of the use of audio-visual media within ghosthunting follows a similar trajectory to that of anthropology, and the resultant methodologies and outputs of both disciplines function in ways that are less inclined towards discursive “speaking with others” than they are towards attempting to produce demystified representations of others. Neither practice has, in contemporary times, acknowledged the historical connection of audio-visual media to the supernatural, nor its capacity to deal with the uncanny as a critical provocation. 


My study of ghosthunters shows that despite attempts to reify ghosts via photography, audio, and film, those media are themselves devices that maintain the uncanny as an ethical injunction towards the other—whether as ghosts or as the cultural “other” of anthropological critique. An acknowledgement of the “haunted” origins and capacities of media allows for ethical engagements with anthropological others, ultimately suggesting critical media methodologies for anthropology that, while informed by anthropology’s “crisis of representation,” radically differ from written ethnography. Viewing the relationship of media and anthropology through the lens of Derrida’s hauntology is a useful framework for thinking about media methodologies that can stand as critique.' - Carrie Clanton

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Hauntology Parish Newsletter - Spring 2017 | Simon Reynolds

Hauntology Parish Newsletter - Spring 2017 | Simon Reynolds | Hauntology | Scoop.it
Lots of activity in the parish this spring! There's a new release from Patterned Air Recordings ; the latest album from Keith Seatman
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Past Futures: Nostalgia in the Age of Escapism

'An online collection of old home movies begs the question: can you be nostalgic for other people's memories? This video explores that question, among others'

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Keith Seatman | all hold hands and off we go (album excerpts)

Released April 2017  - CD and Digital download via Bandcamp | https://keithseatman.bandcamp.com/
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Is There No Alternative?: The Life and Work of Mark Fisher | Michael Grasso

Is There No Alternative?: The Life and Work of Mark Fisher | Michael Grasso | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'The passion Fisher exhibited in every sentence of his prose, the care and concern for his students, who deserved a better deal than they’d gotten, and his own desire to get his own life out from under the weight of neoliberal expectation—these emotions are all familiar to me. As someone who left behind a lucrative career in for-profit corporate education for a materially poorer life in museums (and in freelance internet writing), the price (in dollars, pounds, euros) of opting out of the “natural order” is high. But the cost that many of us pay in mental health by staying enmeshed in the system—well, it can be much, much higher.' - Michael Grasso
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Ghost Box | Fortean Times

Ghost Box | Fortean Times | Hauntology | Scoop.it
The new edition of Fortean Times (FT354 June) with feature article by Bob Fischer, "The Haunted Generation": Weird 70s TV & its influence on Ghost Box, Clay Pipe Music, Trunk, Moon Wiring Club & Scarfolk
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Folk horror as speculative sociology | Modern Mythology | John Ohno

Folk horror as speculative sociology | Modern Mythology | John Ohno | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Folk horror is having a Renaissance, as the novelty cycle revisits the seventies at two iterations’ remove & the SF community starts again to seriously analyze the dialogue between the weird and the hauntological. The spring season, with Easter, Walpurgisnacht, and May Day, is a good time to revisit this, and, as expected, various publications have — not just the usual suspects like Scarfolk, but also The Guardian, which published a piece whose analysis I’d like to pick apart a bit.


Newton’s analysis suggests a rural versus urban dimension (and, by extension, a modernity versus tradition dimension), and while this exists in the text, I consider it shallow. I’d like instead to argue that, rather than being in the tradition of gothic and romantic horror, folk horror has more in common with the point at which weird fiction intersects with science fiction.' - John Ohno

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The Quietus | Features | Vanishing: Where Is The Music Of The Impending Apocalypse? | John Doran

The Quietus | Features | Vanishing: Where Is The Music Of The Impending Apocalypse? | John Doran | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Most other modern genres pale in comparison to metal in the apocalypse stakes. Some producers of noise, techno and dark ambient talk a good Omega game but the lack of lyrical content makes this little more than a colouring agent in my book. Elsewhere, I can detect a subtle millenarian undercurrent to hauntology - probably because of the shaded section on the Venn Diagram that crosses over into Protect And Survive booklets, public information films, Threads and so on. I asked Simon Reynolds if he believed these hauntological fetishes were totally removed from modern day worries about nuclear war: “I don’t think it’s to do with apocalypse or nostalgia for nuclear war or anything daft like that, it’s an aesthetic thing – [people] love of the look and sound of those Public Information Films as little capsules from another time. There’s also a sense of wonder that such creepy, unnerving things were shown to children.” 

And even then, when we put our heads together my initial assumption that there would be untold numbers of hauntological recordings about impending doom seem to be somewhat fanciful. There is the ‘Civil Defence Is Common Sense’ track on The Advisory Circle’s Other Channels album and the nuclear war inspired Tomorrow’s Harvest by Boards Of Canada (again, as much as an instrumental album can be said to be about anything).' - John Doran
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THE FISHER-FUNCTION | VISUAL CULTURES PUBLIC PROGRAMME GOLDSMITHS, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

THE FISHER-FUNCTION | VISUAL CULTURES PUBLIC PROGRAMME  GOLDSMITHS, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The Fisher-Function is a seven week series focused solely on the work of Mark Fisher. Instead of taking the traditional lecture format, The F-F will take the form of collective reading and listening sessions, all open to anyone interested - inside and outside of Goldsmiths, whether you know Mark's work or not.'

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Vanishing Point: How the Light Grid Defined 1980s Futurism | Richard McKenna

Vanishing Point: How the Light Grid Defined 1980s Futurism | Richard McKenna | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Of all the visual shorthand for a particular type of outmoded futurism, one of the most immediately recognizable—like the chrome lettering with which it is often paired—must be the light grid. Usually depicted as a network of glowing straight lines receding in perspective against a black background, occasionally with the outlines of mountains or the blush of dawn visible on the horizon, the light grid (or laser grid, or neon grid) today is in widespread use as the appropriated expression of a perceived aesthetic, a tongue-in-cheek signifier of the naïve dreams of Generation X. It is hard to believe that it once communicated such a potent sense of transformation and possibility, but it did just that. As rocket-fin styling symbolizes the sleek and innocent aspirations of the 1950s, the grid is now the symbol par excellence of “The Eighties,” a now-mythological time when a cocktail of affluence, Cold War tensions, and the encroaching power of computing combined to confer upon the dreamers of the West a form as memorable as it was ephemeral.' - Richard McKenna
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Igloo Magazine :: Snufmumriko :: At First Light (Shimmering Moods) | Igloo Magazine

Igloo Magazine :: Snufmumriko :: At First Light (Shimmering Moods) | Igloo Magazine | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'At First Light is a subtle invitation to navigate through cloudy, frosty, fragile, subjective and impressionistic soundscapes with a fancy for turntablism and hauntology (due to the presence of fractured ghostly loops, reverbed sounding memories and sampled field recordings). Beautiful electronic treatments oscillate with soothing, flowing, grainy concrete sounds and timbral acoustic motifs. Nothing intrusive but delicately relaxing, introspective and evocative.' - Philippe Blache
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Vaporwave: The Musical Wallpaper of Lost Futures | CCCB LAB

Vaporwave: The Musical Wallpaper of Lost Futures | CCCB LAB | Hauntology | Scoop.it

Half a decade after it first appeared, we take stock of this internet-based music genre and explore its critique of consumer culture.' - Arnau Horta

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National Life Stories Annual Lecture 2017 - Uncovering the unspoken: memory and post-war Britain

'David Kynaston delivered the National Life Stories Annual Lecture on 13 March 2017 at the British Library. The lecture focused on memory and its place in the historical analysis of post-war British society. David Kynaston has been a professional historian since 1973 and has written 18 books, including The City of London, a widely acclaimed four-volume history which drew on National Life Stories’ ‘City Lives’ oral history interviews. He is also the author of Austerity Britain, Family Britain, and Modernity Britain, the first three titles in a series of books covering the history of post-war Britain (1945-1979) under the collective title Tales of a New Jerusalem. Austerity Britain was named ‘Book of the Decade’ by The Sunday Times. He is an honorary professor at Kingston University.'
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‘Scarred For Life Volume One: The 70s’ | Daniel Marner

‘Scarred For Life Volume One: The 70s’ | Daniel Marner | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Nostalgia seems to define and dictate our present culture, perhaps as it never has before, in ways undreamt-of as recently as a decade ago. Ever since our ability to record, edit and re-share the visual and sonic textures of our common (and sometimes uncommon) cultural experience became a viable option to those outside the entertainment industry, people (largely, it has to be said, bespectacled introverts with testicles and optional BO) have been doing so.' - Daniel Marner
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What Is Metamodern? blog

What Is Metamodern? blog | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'The generation born into postmodern disaffection/irony and now ready to move on from that seems to scream,“OK, there may be no ‘there’ there, but yet…I’m here!” This is where one might locate the ground of Metamodernism, which, as we see it, seeks to resolve and/or engage the conflicts between Tradition, Modernism and Postmodernism by emphasizing felt experience.' - Greg Dember and Linda Ceriello
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My Friend Mark | Jeremy Gilbert on Mark Fisher

My Friend Mark | Jeremy Gilbert on Mark Fisher | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Here are two versions of basically the same tribute to my departed friend Mark Fisher, who took his own life in January. There are two versions, a very long and a quite long one. The first is my own very very long tribute. It is as much as anything about me and my thoughts, obviously – as it is basically a kind of intellectual history of Marks’ own conceptual journey and my personal and political relationship to it. If you have been dying to find out exactly what I thought of the CCRU in the early 2000s, then this is for you. If not then maybe don’t bother. To be fair if you are interested in a very detailed account of Mark’s intellectual and political development then I think , I hope, you will find this genuinely useful.' - Jeremy Gilbert
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A Hauntology of Precarity | WELCOME TO THE ENTREPRECARIAT | Silvio Lorusso

A Hauntology of Precarity | WELCOME TO THE ENTREPRECARIAT | Silvio Lorusso | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Looking at precarity from the hauntological lens allows us to contemplate a perceived absence and the anxiety it provokes even on subjects with a relatively stable job. In this perspective, precarity becomes the agency of impending failure and poverty. It functions as a malicious prophecy that threaten to become reality. And even if it doesn’t, it is nonetheless able to manipulate people, pushing them to work uninterruptedly, because "who knows what will happen in one year". The hauntological dimension of precarity works also in the opposite direction: the idealized image of baby boomers’ stable, fulfilling life and career renders the contemporary lifestyle bleak, empty, depressing. Both in the future and the past virtuality of precarity, work and life are inseparable.' - Silvio Lorusso
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