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Hacker Farm - UHF

Hacker Farm - UHF | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Hacker Farm have managed to create something that feels genuinely different and odd and exciting for anyone who likes a bit of mystery' - Ian Maleney gets all hauntological on us.
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Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas
Curated by Sean Albiez
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OTHER VOICES 03 AND 04

OTHER VOICES 03 AND 04 | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The next two singles in our Other Voices series both feature very special guests.


Other Voices 03 introduces an exciting new ensemble,The Pattern Forms. Made up of Jon Brooks (The Advisory Circle) with Ed Gibson and Ed MacFarlane (both of Friendly Fires). Expertly crafted, dreamy, electronic pop with light, airborne vocals and just a hint of dark magick.


The next in the series is by Steve Moore, well known for his retro futuristic work both as a solo artist and as bass and keyboard player with Zombi. This single for Other Voices, captures an elegant and minimalistic performance from Moore on analogue synth, Hammond organ and vintage string machine. Two perfectly balanced and paired down science fiction landscape miniatures.' - Belbury Parish Magazine

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Memory, History and Time in 21st Century British Psychogeography | News re. new edited collection for 2015

Memory, History and Time in 21st Century British Psychogeography | News re. new edited collection for 2015 | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Our relationship with the city is intrinsically tied up with our knowledge and memory of it. If a particular city is somewhere we know – from today or from our past – we are unable to separate our psychological responses to it from the materiality of the place itself.

 

This, in fact, is psychogeography and is what makes us all psychogeographers to a degree. A sense of place connects us to a geographic region in a specific way that becomes apparent when we start to explore the emotions attached to particular urban pockets that spark something in us. It might be a memory from our adolescence, such as an independent record shop in our hometown where we purchased our first piece of vinyl, or a more recent memory we have of the experience of moving to a new town or city and the differing aesthetics of that place compared to our last home.

 

These memories are not separate from our self, they inform and form us. The experience of the everyday that is played out in space – walking to the train station, going to the supermarket, taking the dog for a walk – make up a significant part of our day. These practices are imprinted on our psyches over time, forming our relationship with space and at the same time are laid down in our memory of that place, creating our attachment to it.' - Tina Richardson

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#Accelerationism: Remembering the Future - Nick Srnicek, Alex Williams and Armen Avanessian

#Accelerationism: Remembering the Future - Nick Srnicek, Alex Williams and Armen Avanessian | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'What the left must reconnect to is its roots in the Enlightenment, in a rationalist and universal vision of collective human self-construction. This would be to lay claim to a positive vision of the future, capable of supplanting our current economic and political systems with ones which enable, rather than suppress, a generalised human flourishing. Against those across the political spectrum who indulge in the fantasy of local, small-scaled solutions to our many crises, this requires us to re-engineer our complex, abstract, and multi-scalar world without seeking to simplify it according to some pre-conceived schema. In place of folk political solutions, we should be pushing for full automation of work, reduction of the working week, and a universal basic income for everyone. It is these proposals which can lead us away from the conservative stance of anti-austerity, and rejuvenate the future-oriented and progressive politics of the left. For it is only once the left takes command of the future, and modernisation once again becomes synonymous with radical left politics, rather than neoliberalisation, that we can collectively come to grasp our world such that we might change it.' - Nick Srnicek, Alex Williams and Armen Avanessian 

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Scarfolk Council: "Freedom of Speech" Public Information (1975)

Scarfolk Council: "Freedom of Speech" Public Information (1975) | Hauntology | Scoop.it
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John Akomfrah’s Hauntologies - BFI

John Akomfrah’s Hauntologies - BFI | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The overriding sensation as you walk through the gallery is one of a near-swoon, and this is apt: Akomfrah has been exploring the genre of costume drama, how it stages history and makes us nostalgic for a time we may never have known.' - Laura Allsop

 

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The Hauntology of Media Addiction - Eva Zekany - Forum: Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts

'This article proposes an exploration of the phenomenon of media addiction as the expression of a haunting: the sporadic re-emergence of nostalgia for presence, materiality, and the body. After a brief description of the contemporary phenomenon of media addiction, I will in turn bring forward some of the earliest key conflicts involving materiality and immateriality surrounding networked media. These incursions into the history of problematic human-media relationships set the scene for their current incarnations - media addictions - where the incongruity between materiality and immateriality, presence and unpresence, are embodied by figures such as the Internet addict. The clash of materiality and immateriality within media feeds into ideas of spectrality and danger, which are unavoidably problematised as threats to the health and wellbeing of populations in postindustrial contexts. The last section of this paper explores the place of media addiction as an unavoidable human-technology bond that politics of life cannot escape.' - Eva Zekany

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Shining a Light on New York's Beautiful Abandoned Spaces - Hannah Frishberg

Shining a Light on New York's Beautiful Abandoned Spaces - Hannah Frishberg | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'I think that the main comment I get about my pictures is they have anatemporal feeling to them. They look like New York in the '70s or the '80s. When you look at my work, you don't know when those pictures were taken. I'm trying to capture the New York I have in my head. Being a foreigner, I grew up with images of the city and pop culture references from back in the '90s. I guess at the beginning I was just trying to capture the things that I've seen. The New York of today is boring. I guess New York is not the same anymore. It's completely different, even Brooklyn. So I was never interested in taking pictures in SoHo and all that stuff. I wanted to find the real vibe, the real New York. I wanted to recreate the authenticity I have seen in movies. Al Pacino, Carlito's Way, Bryan de Palma, Spike Lee. That's the New York I wanted to capture. That's the inspiration.' -Stéphane Missier,

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The Quietus | Reviews | The Advisory Circle

The Quietus | Reviews | The Advisory Circle | Hauntology | Scoop.it
Of all the artists lumped into the hauntological category, Brooks is perhaps the most classically melodic in his approach, in the main forgoing arcane atmospherics for taut, well-defined lines and contours. Inspired by the library music of the Radiophonic Workshop and the proto-electronica of the 1970s, Brooks is clearly in complete control of his material, which makes From Out Here a particularly satisfying and coherent listening experience.
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John Maus, Hearing Gregorian Plainchant in New Wave

John Maus, Hearing Gregorian Plainchant in New Wave | Hauntology | Scoop.it

From 2011 - 'John Maus’s music is clearly influenced by the ’80s. That is, the 1980s and the 1580s, and everything in between.'

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R/J/L-H: Extract from a conversation with Simon Reynolds, regarding Hauntology

R/J/L-H: Extract from a conversation with Simon Reynolds, regarding Hauntology | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The one thing that came through more clearly when doing the chapter in Retromania, was the extent to which my idea of Hauntology-as-music-genre, and my affection for it, is based around nationality. And I make this opposition between nationality and nationalism. Nationalism is political and it’s an ideology of national greatness or exceptionality. Nationality is pre-political I think – it’s the things I share with all other Britons including so many I have nothing in common with politically or in terms of chosen allegiances (musical, artistic, etc). Nationality in that sense is the pre-chosen, the given rather than what you consciously seek out or align yourself with. There’s this term people use, I’m not sure of the provenance in terms of either who coined it or even what discipline it comes from (Sociology? Anthropology), but the term is “lifeworld” – and I guess it means the realm of customs, everyday life, accents, gestures, rituals, routines, habits, common sense, food etc. I suppose Antonio Gramsci would say this kind of stuff is actually ideological, it’s part of hegemony (Roland Barthes also analysed this kind of thing under Mythologies). But to me it’s more like the common inheritance of phrase and fable, idiom, and also, the arbitrary stylistic and design quirks of the typography used on everyday articles, the look of shops and public institutions, etc.' - Simon Reynolds

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New Landscapes From the Ruins: The Mystique of Buying Records - PopMatters

New Landscapes From the Ruins: The Mystique of Buying Records - PopMatters | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'In his recent book Records Ruin the Landscape (Duke University Press), David Grubbs discusses precisely this process of attempting to understand, and even attain some authentic connection with, a distant locus of artistic production via recorded media. Taking as its focus the plurality of avant-garde musical practice of the ‘60s — now only accessible through archival releases, reissues, and online archives like UbuWeb — the book’s title is adapted from one of John Cage’s characteristically pithy comments made during an interview with Daniel Charles:

 

DC: Records, according to you, are nothing more than postcards…

JC: Which ruin the landscape.' Thomas May

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The 78 Project [Film] - a journey to connect with the haunting recordings of the past

The 78 Project [Film] - a journey to connect with the haunting recordings of the past | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The 78 Project is a documentary and recording journey inspired by Alan Lomax and his quest to capture music where it lived throughout the early 20th century. Our project brings the spirit of his work into the present as we pair breakthrough musicians with the songs and the fascinating recording technology of the past. With just one microphone, one authentic 1930′s Presto direct-to-acetate disk recorder, and one blank lacquer disc, musicians are given one take to cut a record anywhere they choose. What we have found is that the film, music and feelings that result defy space and time, living music inspired by ghosts.'

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The Advisory Circle present 'Winter From Out Here'

The Advisory Circle celebrate the release of their new album 'From Out Here' on Ghost Box with this all-vinyl hour of library music, electronics, obscurities, curiosities and current favourites.

https://ghostbox.greedbag.com/buy/from-out-here/

http://www.ghostbox.co.uk

http://cafekaput.blogspot.co.uk
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Why the 1970s was the most terrifying decade - Richard Littler - The Telegraph

Why the 1970s was the most terrifying decade - Richard Littler - The Telegraph | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'I had thought Scarfolk a personal interpretation of the 1970s filtered through my own (numerous) childhood neuroticisms, fears and memory fragments; Scarfolk certainly does not reflect what for many is the decade of flares, discos and lava lamps. Influenced by Monty Python, George Orwell, The League of Gentlemen, Chris Morris, and cartoonists such as Gerald Scarfe and Ralph Steadman, I was aware that Scarfolk also fits into a movement of sorts called ‘Hauntology’, which is concerned with what some might consider darker aspects of the 1970s: Brutalist architecture, disquieting TV theme music, a resurgent interest in paganism, new (now old) technologies and other everyday ephemera. Hauntology also heavily plays on and warps the half-memories of those who were brought up between the late 60s and early 80s. It’s not nostalgia as such; there are no rose-tinted spectacles, nor is there a desire for those days to return.' - Richard Littler

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Brannten Schnüre and German Hauntology - Henning Lahmann – No Fear Of Pop

Brannten Schnüre and German Hauntology - Henning Lahmann – No Fear Of Pop | Hauntology | Scoop.it

From 2011: 'Although the tendency to fall for trite, romanticist pastiche is always only a step away in Germany, I've felt that hauntology as an artistic concept has never really gained a foothold in the local experimental underground (as opposed to fine art, a point convincingly made by Adam Harper in reference to Neo Rauch). Considering this, I was both very surprised and quite intrigued to come across the latest offering by Frankfurt-based cassette imprint SicSic Tapes, a C-40 split between Johannes Schebler aka Baldruin and Christian Schoppik, who records under the moniker Brannten Schnüre. In fact it was the latter's side of the tape that really grabbed my attention. Brannten Schnüre's six tracks (that can all be streamed over here) deliver a disturbing if not outright frightening séance made up of looped, slowly meandering instrumental sound collages that feature a good deal of crackling and tape hiss (most likely because the snippets were directly taken from an audio or video cassette). However, what struck me most was Schoppik's choice of source material. As it turns out (according to the description given by the label), he derived a lot of (most?) samples from "obscure Czechoslovakian films", a method that in my view deserves a closer look in regard to the condition of possibility of a "genuine" hauntology in the domestic music scene.' - Henning Lahmann

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'Even the Ghost was more than one person': Hauntology and Authenticity in Todd Haynes' I'm Not There | Carolyn D'Cruz and Glen D'Cruz | Film-Philosophy

'If the opening sequence of a film is a microscopic 'event' that achieves far more than setting the tone and whetting the appetite for what we are about to see, then Todd Haynes' I'm Not There is exemplary. This paper works its way through the conceptually dense and intricately woven textual layers of the film's opening to stage a three-way dialogue between Haynes, Bob Dylan and Jacques Derrida: three mavericks who defy simple categorisation, by transgressing the boundaries of their respective fields (song writing, cinema and philosophy). By introducing Derrida's deconstructive logic of hauntology as a strategy for reading Haynes' biopic on Dylan, the figure of the ghost is called upon to situate the quest for an identity's authenticity as a perennial, irresolvable problem in song, cinema and philosophy. Belonging to a time that is neither past nor present, a place that is neither here nor there, the ghost offers the perfect medium to join Haynes, Dylan and Derrida in (re)thinking identity in terms that respond to a call (in the name of art, justice and truth, among other things) that is not based on an unyielding conception of authenticity.' - Carolyn D'Cruz and Glen D'Cruz

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CLOSE-UP | Hauntologies: The Ghost, Voice and the Gallery

CLOSE-UP | Hauntologies: The Ghost, Voice and the Gallery | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'In Hauntologies Akomfrah is referencing a pluralised consideration of the critical notion of "hauntology". It is the nature of the ghost and the situation of being haunted that frames and forms this term. Hauntology is itself a notion with many permutations, from the phantasmagoria, the uncanny and Jacques Derrida to more recent writing on sonic theories and music. Articles and blog posts online overflow with complaints about the vagueness of, or lack of definition associated with this term. As a term hauntology dissects language relating to ghosts, the situation of being haunted, and the implications these have upon our understanding of the past in the present.' - Claire M. Holdsworth

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Haunted by the Holidays: 'A Christmas Carol' and the Ghost of Christmas Past - Greg Garrett

Haunted by the Holidays: 'A Christmas Carol' and the Ghost of Christmas Past - Greg Garrett | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'We are haunted during the holidays by things done and left undone, but especially by the Ghost of Christmas Past. You can hear that melancholy and nostalgia in many of our best-known Christmas songs, from Sam Smith's old-fashioned new version of "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" to "I'll be Home for Christmas" to "Merry Christmas Darling." Why, in this season of joy, are we so often brought to the point of tears? Well partly it's because the past, as Mr. Faulkner said, isn't past. It's always present, swirling around us, reminding us of who we were, are, and ought to be (and maybe where we ought to be, and with whom).

Those ghosts may sadden us or frighten us, but critics who work within a literary field called Hauntology argue that in stories from The Iliad to Hamlet to The Sixth Sense, these ghosts of longing may haunt us from our past, but they simultaneously beckon us forward toward our future. A good haunting may, in fact, be just the thing we require to achieve our best destiny, to become the people we are called to become. And what better time than the holidays to face those ghosts head-on and amend our lives?' - Greg Garrett

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THE ADVISORY CIRCLE, FROM OUT HERE, RELEASED TODAY.

THE ADVISORY CIRCLE, FROM OUT HERE, RELEASED TODAY. | Hauntology | Scoop.it
From Out Here is available now on LP, CD and download from the Ghost Box shop , your usual online retailers and finer record shops around the world. The LP version comes on heavyweight 180g vinyl and includes a free download code.
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John Maus - Believer (Official Video) - YouTube

From 2011 - 'Created using a mixture of rare vintage video equipment and experimental techniques the new video for Believer takes us deep into the often blurry yet always determined world of John Maus'

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R/J/L-H: Extract from a conversation with Mark Fisher, regarding Hauntology...

R/J/L-H: Extract from a conversation with Mark Fisher, regarding Hauntology... | Hauntology | Scoop.it

R/J/L-H: In relation to music, specifically, Simon (Reynolds) say's that he has now come to prefer the term Memoradelia. Any thoughts?

MF: I think Memoradelia only captures part of it. The spectral dimension is a very important part of Hauntology. This idea of lost futures isn't about memory, not straightforwardly anyway, it's about anticipation, it's about... For me a key aspect of Hauntology is the age of the virtual, as I call it. The capacity of the virtual to effect things. A lot of what we call spectral, ghostly, can be classified under that term. The reason why the concept of haunting seems so apasit in the 21st century, was the sense of we live in the ruins of lost futures, really, the future failed to arrive, in the 21st century. Not a specific detrimental future with had in mind failed to arrive, but the sense of futurity had disappeared from 21st century life. It's that pang, that longing, for a future that failed to arrive, seems to me one of the curial dimensions.

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The Belbury Parish Magazine: THE ADVISORY CIRCLE'S "WINTER FROM OUT HERE" MIX

The Belbury Parish Magazine: THE ADVISORY CIRCLE'S "WINTER FROM OUT HERE" MIX | Hauntology | Scoop.it
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