Hauntology
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Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas
Curated by Sean Albiez
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Popular Music and Retro Culture in the Digital Era | Jean Hogarty | Routledge

Popular Music and Retro Culture in the Digital Era | Jean Hogarty | Routledge | Hauntology | Scoop.it
This book explores the trend of retro and nostalgia within contemporary popular music culture.Using empirical evidence obtained from a case study of fans’ engagement with older music, the book argues that retro culture is the result of an inseparable mix of cultural and technological changes, namely, the rise of a new generation and cultural mood along with the encouragement of new technologies. Retro culture has become a hot topic in recent years but this is the first time the subject has been explored from an academic perspective and from the fans’ perspective. As such, this book promises to provide concrete answers about why retro culture dominates in contemporary society.
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Popping Off: How Weird Al, Drake, PC Music and You Are All Caught up in the Same Feedback Loop - Aimee Cliff

Popping Off: How Weird Al, Drake, PC Music and You Are All Caught up in the Same Feedback Loop - Aimee Cliff | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Today, we don’t just consume stuff online, we document every second of our interaction with said stuff. Within seconds of its release we re-produce it, screenshot it, memeify it and attach emojis to it (you don’t have to look much further than Nicki’s “Anaconda” cover for an example). Our culture is a feedback loop, and by that logic we no longer need parody artists to exist, feeding top-down satirical interpretations of pop cultural phenomena to us, because pop, high and parody culture all exist together in one entangled knot.' - Aimee Cliff

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The Trouble with Contemporary Music Criticism - Retromania, Retro-historicism, and History | James Parker and Nicholas Croggon | Tiny Mix Tapes

The Trouble with Contemporary Music Criticism - Retromania, Retro-historicism, and History | James Parker and Nicholas Croggon | Tiny Mix Tapes | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Vaporwave is a particularly “weak” genre ... because “by dramatically foregrounding the act of appropriation, precisely by refusing to be ‘original,’” what vaporwave does is make “the listening experience all about that original; maybe even about the discourse of originality itself”. Vaporwave is not itself muzak, in other words, it is about muzak. And as a result, it forces us to reconsider the extent of our commitment to a whole series of apparent distinctions: between “-sic” and “-zak,” high and low, art and commerce, culture and trash. It forces us to consider the conditions of contemporary musical listening and production per se.'

Sean Albiez's insight:

A response to this article can be found here 

http://thefantastichope.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/further-to-this-debate-about-retromania.html

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Out With the New | on Simon Reynolds and Retromania - The Point Magazine

Out With the New | on Simon Reynolds and Retromania - The Point Magazine | Hauntology | Scoop.it

“The Nineties felt like this long, sustained ascent, what with the Internet and the info-tech boom, techno rave and its associated drugs,” notes Reynolds. “But the 2000s turned out to be a plateau … it seemed like nothing momentous had happened. Worse, it was a struggle to pinpoint what defined the era as a separate era musically.” An intuitive test for this theory is supplied by the tech-philosopher Jaron Lanier in his excellent You Are Not a Gadget (2010). “Popular music created in the industrialized world in the decade from the late 1990s to the late 2000s doesn’t have a distinct style,” he writes, “that is, one that would provide an identity for the young people who grew up with it.” - Ben Jeffery

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Simon Reynolds, Retromania and the Atemporality of Contemporary 'Pop' by James Parker

Simon Reynolds, Retromania and the Atemporality of Contemporary 'Pop' by James Parker | Hauntology | Scoop.it

Review of Simon Reynolds' Retromania: Pop Cultures Addiction to its Own Past' by James Parker 

 

'This review begins by positioning the book relative to Reynolds' previous work, a close reading of which, it is argued, reveals a specifically 'modernist' vision of pop and the function of music to which Reynolds has remained committed for virtually the entire duration of his career. The arguments in the book itself are then submitted to a critical analysis, with particular attention paid to Reynolds' claims about technology and recent developments in the musical underground. Finally, it is suggested that Reynolds' book is basically persuasive, and that it is best understood as a provocation. Ultimately, what Retromania does is to force us — musicians, critics, listeners — to think more carefully about what is at stake in retro, to think twice before we endorse or applaud it, to remember that sometimes, in some contexts, retro is simply not good enough, that we can and sometimes should do better.'

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Forum 2016 : Simon Reynolds - Tomorrow Never Known: the unpredictable future of pop culture | European Lab Forum

European Lab forum 6e édition Europe de la culture : année zéro 4 — 8 mai 2016 Simon Reynolds - Tomorrow Never Know : Le futur imprévisible de la Po
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Hauntology: The Spectre of Pop - Tida Wilson - FUTURE COLLECTIVE

Hauntology: The Spectre of Pop - Tida Wilson - FUTURE COLLECTIVE | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The birth of popular culture also brought about its very own destruction, albeit quite prematurely. But what is culture if not a form of recycling, an ongoing citation? We know that there is nothing new under the sun. What we considered as new, is the not yet explored. How then, this exploration could be made entirely possible? How do we revive what’s already—or what’s always—been dead? What is exactly to be done?'

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Florian Cramer - Post-digital Aesthetics ◊ Jeu de Paume / le magazine

'Post-digitality, in a 2013 definition, can therefore overlap with what is otherwise called “retro media” or, to quote Simon Reynolds, “Retromania”. What Reynolds, from his pop music historian perspective, misses to see in his much-discussed 2011 book on “Pop Culture’s Addiction to Its Own Past” is that the contemporary renaissance of vinyl and audio cassettes have different cultural significance than, for example, a Motown or a punk revival. To quote his introduction, retro “is always about the relatively immediate past, about stuff that happened in living memory”. Vinyl and cassettes indeed meet those criteria; the lack of a larger scale renaissance of, for example, reel-to-reel tape recorders backs up Reynolds’ point. On the other hand, there is a contemporary logic to the return of vinyl after mp3 and, more generally, the distribution of music as files had rendered CDs clumsy hybrids of mp3s and classical records — lacking the flexibility of a file while also lacking the crafty visuality and tangibility of the LP and the DIY cassette. Vinyl and cassettes have thus become post-digital media. They exist today only because they compensate for deficiencies of digital files — deficiencies that are both aesthetic and social, since tangible media are means of face-to-face interpersonal exchange. Exactly the same is true for the booming media of artistic printmaking: zines are made because they are not blogs, artists’ DIY books are printed because they are not web sites or PDFs.' - Florian Cramer

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Retromania, Time Warps, Revivalism & Slovenia - Chipflip

Retromania, Time Warps, Revivalism & Slovenia - Chipflip | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'... chipmusic was always “retro”. From the start. That’s why it doesn’t really make sense to call it retro. To say that micromusic.net or the 1990s Amiga demoscene was retro, doesn’t really compute. Reynolds talks about two kinds of retromaniacs which I think capture the tension in the chip scene:

 

The revivalist dissident chooses an era and stays there. Some people still listen to the same chipmusic hits from the 1980s, and love it. It’s some sort of neo-conservatism, a rebellion against the new in mass culture, a freeze in the past. Lots of demoscene vibes here…

 

Time-warp cults focus on unsuccessful parts of an old era. Go back, and change the future. This reminds me of the 00′s chipscene mantra of “making something new with the old”. And it also makes me think about media archeology and all kinds of lo-fi practices in the context of Phine Artz. It’s not old (nostalgia) — it’s new and fresh! (appropriation). Retrofuturism, I suppose.' - Chipflip

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Is Our Retro Obsession Ruining Everything? - Simon Reynolds interview

Is Our Retro Obsession Ruining Everything? - Simon Reynolds interview | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'As a rock critic, I’ve been anxious about music for a long while. I find very retro, overtly nostalgic music, like what you see coming from Jack White, Lana Del Rey, or Fleet Foxes, to be, well, retrograde. I’m into innovation and moving forward. All the music I grew up on was like that, starting with post-punk music. Then in the ’80s, I was into Sonic Youth and My Bloody Valentine, and in the ’90s, I was involved in the electronic scene. So the idea that, in the 21st century, music is modeled on the past seems counterproductive, or a failure, even. Obviously, musicians always draw influence from the past, but I’m talking about bands that explicitly copy the Beatles or something classic like that.' Simon Reynolds

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