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J.C. Penny update: Too Much Change, Too Fast? Or Customer Connection failure?

J.C. Penny update:  Too Much Change, Too Fast? Or Customer Connection failure? | Harvard Trends | Scoop.it

It is less about how fast CEOs are willing to move than how quickly their most reliable customers are prepared to change.

   

Ron Johnson's bold overhaul of the sagging American retailing icon J.C. Penny went too far too fast.

 

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Failure simply means leadership went too fast or didn't go fast enough. That's rationalization, not insight.

 

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 When "reckless" moves succeed, they're retrospectively rebranded as "bold." When "timidity" triumphs, it's celebrated as "patient" and "safe."

  

Failure simply means leadership went too fast or didn't go fast enough. That's rationalization, not insight.

  

How fast are your customers willing to change?

 

Your own rate of change is determined less by the quality or price/performance of your offerings than the measurable readiness of your customers and clients.

  

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Electrolux's  70% rule helps identify and clarify their customers' readiness for change.

 

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Their internal readiness matters more than yours. Their inertia matters more than your momentum.

  

Electrolux, has implemented a new "70% rule" for testing its new product innovations to make sure it's not getting too far ahead or falling too quickly behind either its customers or competitors.

 

Electrolux CEO Keith McLoughlin has declared that new product prototypes have to enjoy at least a 70% customer preference rate in blind competition with best-selling rival products. "

 

Speed to market" isn't what's driving the change.

 

The goal is assuring that the firm's ability to innovate is effectively aligned with the customers' willingness to value them. The 70% rule helps identify and clarify their customers' readiness for change.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 26, 2012 3:07 PM

It's alluring, thinking it is about getting the amount of change just right.  Wrong focus.  It is about where and who the customers area, and how adaptable and ready they are for change.


On the individual level, it's also about preferences for change.  The assessment tool, iWam (the Inventory for Work Attitude and Motivation) has a "clock" feature that shows individual preferences for change.  

As goes the individual, probably so goes the customer culture, witness the articles overview of the tech market and the appliances market.  ~ D

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Female muscle, the Changing Politics & Economy of Gender, Women in Leadership

Female muscle, the Changing Politics & Economy of Gender, Women in Leadership | Harvard Trends | Scoop.it

"Insights into Leadership & the Politics of Gender via the book, The End of Men: And the Rise of Women by Hanna Rosin to be published in Britain in October"

 

At the local Women's Exchange of Washtenaw Forum 2012, one of our Open Space group discussions was on the Politics of Gender.  This intriguing book brings up good points about the shifts & changes in our disruptive, social media charged, globally connected world.    


The photo set, including several public photos, is here:  Women, Empowerment at WXW Open Space Exchange Forum2012   ~  Deb

 

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“All the things we need to be good at to thrive in the world…are things that my female friends and competitors are better at than me.”

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Excerpted - from the Economist, Sept. 2012:

 

Women dominate university attendance around the world.

   

In South Korea more women than men pass the foreign-service exam, which has sparked the foreign ministry to implement a minimum quota for men.      In Brazil nearly a third of women earn more than their husbands, a phenomenon that has caused men to form church support-groups calling themselves “Men of Tears”.     Ms Rosin, an editor at Atlantic, whose book grew out of an article she wrote for the magazine in 2010, highlights how women today are excelling, while men founder.
As part of her research, she travelled to many corners of America, including Auburn-Opelika, Alabama, where women’s median income is 40% higher than men’s.  

The financial crisis has been especially unkind to men: three-quarters of the 7.5m American jobs lost in the recession belonged to men and were in traditionally masculine industries, such as construction, manufacturing and finance.

   

“Probably no one has had their wife move up the ladder as far as I’ve moved down,” says one man.     Another, who is annoyed that his girlfriend earns more than he does, complains, “All the things we need to be good at to thrive in the world…are things that my female friends and competitors are better at than me.”

 

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The new service-based economy rewards communication and adaptation, qualities that women are more likely to have.

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Ms Rosin highlights the deterioration of the male-in-the-workplace condition.

   

The new service-based economy rewards communication and adaptation, qualities that women are more likely to have.      Only about 3% of men have taken over raising children full-time while their wives support their families.      Instead, many men, especially young ones, have retreated into a world of video games, drinking and prolonged adolescence—a phenomenon identified in “Guyland”, a 2008 book by an American sociologist, Michael Kimmel.

 

Read the full post here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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