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Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from sustainable architecture
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SHADE: A Solar Home Adapts for Sustainable Desert Living

SHADE: A Solar Home Adapts for Sustainable Desert Living | Harvard Trends | Scoop.it

Team ASUNM, a collaborative effort between Arizona State University and University of New Mexico, has come together to address the inefficiencies of urban sprawl and to create a model for sustainable desert living, dubbed SHADE (Solar Home Adapting for Desert Equilibrium), which is an entry in the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition that takes place on October 3-13, 2013 in Irvine, California.

 

Using external vertical screens and a solar canopy for shade, the SHADE home experiences a stable, consistent temperature with the use of a radiant cooling system used alongside an air cooling unit. Team ASUNM is exploring the residential application of thermal storage to chill water at night to create ice that cools a glycol solution during the day.


Via Lauren Moss
Pedro Barbosa's insight:

Exploring the deserts as a place to live may be a trend for the next decades or centuries. Here is one of the best approaches

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com | www.theendoffacebook.com

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gawlab's curator insight, July 18, 2013 3:28 PM

would love to know about existence of such solutions in Africa..

http://youtu.be/3AvjpnYE1gQ

Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from green streets
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The Urban Farming Technique That Will Revolutionize the Way We Eat

The Urban Farming Technique That Will Revolutionize the Way We Eat | Harvard Trends | Scoop.it

Aquaponics uses fish to create soil-less farms that can fit into cities much easier.

 

Urban farming today is no longer a hobby practiced by a few dedicated enthusiasts growing food for themselves. It has become a truly innovative field in which pioneering ventures are creating real, robust, and scalable solutions for growing food for large numbers of people directly at the point of consumption. This is great news not only for urban designers, architects, and building engineers, but also for residents and communities that want to increase food security and become more resilient to climate change.

Visit the article link for more information and details on the practice of aquaponics, natural resource efficiency and the potential for large-scale urban cultivation...


Via Lauren Moss
Pedro Barbosa's insight:

Urban Farming : coming next

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

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Anji Connell's curator insight, April 10, 2013 10:53 PM

'Rooftops present a great opportunity for farming; they are large, unexploited spaces within the city. Most commercial rooftops are also perfectly fit for the technical challenges, in terms of building physics, zoning laws, and system integration with the host building. A standard commercial rooftop in a Western city is about four times the size of our test farm, which means it could produce up to 20 tons of vegetables and four tons of fish — an annual harvest to feed 400. A significant part, if not the entire annual consumption, of fresh fish and vegetables for a building’s tenants could be served through its roof.'

Megan Moore's curator insight, June 1, 2:22 AM

What a great article, this is something that everyone should read. Make sure you read it all before showing your class, so you can answer any questions they have.

Its weird to think the world will be in another ten years time...What will they think of next?

AWESOME!!!

Linked to the Australian Curriculum, Technologies:

-Apply safe procedures when using a variety of materials, components, tools, equipment and techniques to make designed solutions (ACTDEP026)

Megan

John Taylor's curator insight, October 27, 5:27 PM

Fish and Fish guts adds organic material-great fertiliser!