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Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from green streets
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The Urban Farming Technique That Will Revolutionize the Way We Eat

The Urban Farming Technique That Will Revolutionize the Way We Eat | Harvard Trends | Scoop.it

Aquaponics uses fish to create soil-less farms that can fit into cities much easier.

 

Urban farming today is no longer a hobby practiced by a few dedicated enthusiasts growing food for themselves. It has become a truly innovative field in which pioneering ventures are creating real, robust, and scalable solutions for growing food for large numbers of people directly at the point of consumption. This is great news not only for urban designers, architects, and building engineers, but also for residents and communities that want to increase food security and become more resilient to climate change.

Visit the article link for more information and details on the practice of aquaponics, natural resource efficiency and the potential for large-scale urban cultivation...


Via Lauren Moss
Pedro Barbosa's insight:

Urban Farming : coming next

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

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Anji Connell's curator insight, April 11, 2013 3:53 AM

'Rooftops present a great opportunity for farming; they are large, unexploited spaces within the city. Most commercial rooftops are also perfectly fit for the technical challenges, in terms of building physics, zoning laws, and system integration with the host building. A standard commercial rooftop in a Western city is about four times the size of our test farm, which means it could produce up to 20 tons of vegetables and four tons of fish — an annual harvest to feed 400. A significant part, if not the entire annual consumption, of fresh fish and vegetables for a building’s tenants could be served through its roof.'

Megan Moore's curator insight, June 1, 2014 7:22 AM

What a great article, this is something that everyone should read. Make sure you read it all before showing your class, so you can answer any questions they have.

Its weird to think the world will be in another ten years time...What will they think of next?

AWESOME!!!

Linked to the Australian Curriculum, Technologies:

-Apply safe procedures when using a variety of materials, components, tools, equipment and techniques to make designed solutions (ACTDEP026)

Megan

John Taylor's curator insight, October 27, 2014 9:27 PM

Fish and Fish guts adds organic material-great fertiliser!

Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Change Leadership Watch
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J.C. Penny update: Too Much Change, Too Fast? Or Customer Connection failure?

J.C. Penny update:  Too Much Change, Too Fast? Or Customer Connection failure? | Harvard Trends | Scoop.it

It is less about how fast CEOs are willing to move than how quickly their most reliable customers are prepared to change.

   

Ron Johnson's bold overhaul of the sagging American retailing icon J.C. Penny went too far too fast.

 

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Failure simply means leadership went too fast or didn't go fast enough. That's rationalization, not insight.

 

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 When "reckless" moves succeed, they're retrospectively rebranded as "bold." When "timidity" triumphs, it's celebrated as "patient" and "safe."

  

Failure simply means leadership went too fast or didn't go fast enough. That's rationalization, not insight.

  

How fast are your customers willing to change?

 

Your own rate of change is determined less by the quality or price/performance of your offerings than the measurable readiness of your customers and clients.

  

_______________

   

Electrolux's  70% rule helps identify and clarify their customers' readiness for change.

 

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Their internal readiness matters more than yours. Their inertia matters more than your momentum.

  

Electrolux, has implemented a new "70% rule" for testing its new product innovations to make sure it's not getting too far ahead or falling too quickly behind either its customers or competitors.

 

Electrolux CEO Keith McLoughlin has declared that new product prototypes have to enjoy at least a 70% customer preference rate in blind competition with best-selling rival products. "

 

Speed to market" isn't what's driving the change.

 

The goal is assuring that the firm's ability to innovate is effectively aligned with the customers' willingness to value them. The 70% rule helps identify and clarify their customers' readiness for change.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 26, 2012 8:07 PM

It's alluring, thinking it is about getting the amount of change just right.  Wrong focus.  It is about where and who the customers area, and how adaptable and ready they are for change.


On the individual level, it's also about preferences for change.  The assessment tool, iWam (the Inventory for Work Attitude and Motivation) has a "clock" feature that shows individual preferences for change.  

As goes the individual, probably so goes the customer culture, witness the articles overview of the tech market and the appliances market.  ~ D