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Why do we have museums? - J. V. Maranto

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-we-have-museums-j-v-maranto Museums have been a part of human history for over 2,000 years -- but they wer...
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The Atlantic slave trade: What too few textbooks told you - Anthony Hazard

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-atlantic-slave-trade-what-your-textbook-never-told-you-anthony-hazard Slavery has occurred in many forms thro...
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Where did English come from? - Claire Bowern

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/where-did-english-come-from-claire-bowern When we talk about ‘English’, we often think of it as a single language...
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What people in 1900 thought the year 2000 would look like

What people in 1900 thought the year 2000 would look like | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it
Whale-buses, aviation police and new-fangled barbers: A fantastic vision of the future

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, October 8, 2015 11:51 AM

A great way for students to see how people in the past viewed the future, and an invitation to do the same for our own future.  

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The Living Wage Map

The Living Wage Map | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it
MIT’s Living Wage Calculator estimates the cost of living ("living wage") in each of the nation's counties and major metropolitan areas, and compares it to the minimum wage for a variety of household types. Mapped here are three types: parent with spouse and two children, single parent with one child, and single adult.

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Population, Sustainability, and Malthus: Crash Course World History 215 - YouTube

In which John Green teaches you about population. So, how many people can reasonably live on the Earth? Thomas Malthus got it totally wrong in the 19th centu...
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AP Human Geography FRQs

AP Human Geography FRQs | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it

"Based upon student reactions to their multiple choice exams, I can tell that the types of questions are NOT, 'choose the correct definition for the vocabulary term.' Instead, the types of questions are leading towards giving an example of a real world phenomenon and then requesting students to tell which term best applies. And though I have not seen an actual test, it sounds like the kids were saying that the questions require more reading than the answers (I would actually prefer that to the alternative)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2015 10:46 AM

This article (with the outstanding infographic above) from the Human Imprint is an excellent primer to get students ready for the APHG exam.    


TagsAPHG, infographic.  

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Weatherman nails pronouncing Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogo | WGN-TV

Weatherman nails pronouncing Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogo | WGN-TV | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHxO0UdpoxM Channel 4 (UK) weather presenter Liam Dutton is, according to his Twitter bio, a qualified meteorologist, writer and musician, though from September 8 onward he’ll most likely be known as the man who pronounced Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwll...

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Quiz: Can You Figure Out the Meaning of Centuries-Old Slang?

Quiz: Can You Figure Out the Meaning of Centuries-Old Slang? | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it
The words historical thesaurus may send children running to the hills, for fear they're likely to be bored to death by some fellow with a…

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Joycelyn DeVore's curator insight, February 4, 2015 9:55 PM

This is a quiz made by Time Magazine that shows how language has changed over time, and why language is important. 

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This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes

This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it
This interactive, designed and built by Slate’s Andrew Kahn, gives you a sense of the scale of the trans-Atlantic slave trade across time, as well as the flow of transport and eventual destinations. The dots—which represent individual slave ships—also correspond to the size of each voyage. The larger the dot, the more enslaved people on board. And if you pause the map and click on a dot, you’ll learn about the ship’s flag—was it British? Portuguese? French?—its origin point, its destination, and its history in the slave trade. The interactive animates more than 20,000 voyages cataloged in the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database.

Via Seth Dixon
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Armando's curator insight, June 28, 2015 6:59 AM

This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes

Denise Patrylo-Murray's curator insight, July 8, 2015 9:40 PM

Use for Global History warm up.

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Hagia Sofia: Dome Secrets

Hagia Sofia: Dome Secrets | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it
Explore the secrets in the building of the crowning glory of Hagia Sophia, a dome 56 metres high and 31 metres across. Find out how it was built.
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Turkish Germany

Turkish Germany | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it
When groups of people immigrate into a new country, they maintain their culture and traditions as best as they can. That's the case with Turks in Germany.
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Top 10 United States Landmarks

Top 10 United States Landmarks | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it
From nature's loveliest landmarks to incredible man-made marvels, America the Beautiful has some of the world's most popular sightseeing spots. Join WatchMojo as we count down our pics for the top 10 United States landmarks.
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A brief history of religion in art - TED-Ed

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-brief-history-of-religion-in-art-ted-ed Before we began putting art into museums, art mostly served as the visu...
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How languages evolve - Alex Gendler

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-languages-evolve-alex-gendler Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from wh...
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How English evolved. The evolution of the English Language.

Did you ever wonder where all the English Words originated? This explains exactly how and where English Words came from, including the Words which were creat...
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A State-by-State Map of Where U.S. Immigrants Came From

A State-by-State Map of Where U.S. Immigrants Came From | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it
The new Pew interactive covers 1850 to 2013.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, October 9, 2015 9:57 AM

Very interesting interactive map of where the majority of immigrants came from for each state, from 1850 to 2013.  

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John Skelton's "Speke Parott"

A Middle English reading of John Skelton's poem "Speke Parrot". Find the full poem, with notes and glosses on www.skeltonproject.com/spekeparott Find us on: ...
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Map: The risk of genocide around the world

Map: The risk of genocide around the world | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it
The U.S. Holocaust Museum wants to prevent future mass killings.

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AP Human Geography FRQ and Exam Breakdown

AP Human Geography FRQ and Exam Breakdown | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 19, 2015 4:48 PM

This outstanding infographic from the Human Imprint is an excellent summary of the AP Human Geography exam and gives some valuable insights to prepare students to pass the exam.  This is well worth the read for any APHG teacher.    


TagsAPHG, infographic.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 5, 2015 4:15 PM

This chart is loaded with useful data about the AP Exam.  If you're looking to focus your studying this deserves some of your time (as well as your "verbs" sheet from class

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Photographs: 22+ International Borders Around The World

Photographs: 22+ International Borders Around The World | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures. These photos of different national borders around the world show you how both friendly and hostile nations like to fence off their turf.

Via Mr. David Burton
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Off the Spice Rack: The Story of Salt — Hungry History

Off the Spice Rack: The Story of Salt — Hungry History | Harmony Social Studies | Scoop.it

has been pivotNot just tasty but essential for life, salt has a long and tumultuous history all its own.

 

You wouldn’t think it to look at them, but your salt and pepper shakers have caused a lot of problems over the years. Underneath that innocuous ceramic bulb lies a history of kingdoms torn apart, newly discovered worlds and powerful trade dynasties. The story of spices fills many a book, but we’re going to take an abridged look at salt and pepper over the next two weeks.

Salt doesn’t just make your food tastier—it’s actually required for life. Sodium ions help the body perform a number of basic tasks, including maintaining the fluid in blood cells and helping the small intestine absorb nutrients. We can’t make salt in our own bodies, so humans have always had to look to their environments to fill the need. Early hunters could get a steady supply of salt from meat, but agricultural groups had to seek it out by following animal tracks to salt deposits.


Via Seth Dixon
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How an Amateur Built the World’s Biggest Dome

In 1418, Filippo Brunelleschi was tasked with building the largest dome ever seen at the time. He had no formal architecture training. Yet experts still don’t fully understand the brilliant methods he used in contructing the dome, which tops the Santa Maria del Fiore cathedral in Florence, Italy.
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