Political Geography
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The Greek Debt Crisis Explained in Four Minutes - YouTube

In which John explains the Greek debt crisis, which has pushed the Greek government close to defaulting on its loans, the reasons why the Euro zone and the I...
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Understanding the National Debt and Budget Deficit - YouTube

In which John discusses the US national debt, the federal budget deficit, plans for shrinking or eliminating the deficit, and tries to provide some context t...
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World War 1 in 6 Minutes - YouTube

Like Manny Man on Facebook: http://goo.gl/WrSqDW Follow John D Ruddy on Twitter: http://twitter.com/johndruddyactor Subscribe on Youtube: http://www.youtube....
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Why can't we just print money to pay off debt? - YouTube

A video looking at way you can't simply print money to pay off debt. And what has happened when countries have tried to! And for that matter why a country ha...
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America: Country or Continent? - YouTube

COPYRIGHT INFO: Music is used with permission as it is royalty free provided credit is given. License - Hammock Fight - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licen...
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10 Curious Micro-Nations - YouTube

10 Curious Micro-Nations Want to worship a giant penguin? Then maybe you should consider moving to one of these 10 curious micronations. Music = Go Town by B...
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The Most Complex International Borders in the World - YouTube

In this video I look at some of the most complex international border. Of course, there are more complex borders in the world, but this video looks at some o...
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Videographic: China's territorial claims - YouTube

Suspicions between the People's Republic and its neighbours bedevil its boundaries to the east, south and west. Added to www.audiovideo.economist.com in Febr...
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Devolution: A Beginner's Guide

Devolution: A Beginner's Guide | Political Geography | Scoop.it
What is devolution and how has it changed how Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales are governed?

 

This article with videos, charts and images was designed as a primer for UK voters for the 2010 election to understand who devolution in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland were reshaping the political landscape in the United Kingdom.  It is general enough that even though it is outdated as a news story, it serves as a concrete example from geography students to understand the processes and reasons for a decentralization of political power.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:44 AM

The parliament in London is shifting more power to Scotland and other areas in what is called devolution.  This reflects a push for more independence of countries in the UK that are not England. In order to keep the UK together concessions must be made, this devolution is the British Parliament's efforts to keep the UK intact.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 11, 2015 9:30 AM

Unit 4 political geography 

This picture explains how devolution works and provides a specific example with the breaking down of power of the imperialist England and it's control into an equally represented United Kingdom. This is an example of devolution at it's best.

This picture relates to unit 4 because it shows how devolution, which is a major part of unit 4, works. It explains it's parts and gives specific geographic examples as in the U.K. this overall relates to unit 4.

Matthew Connealy's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:04 PM

Devolution is the transfer of powers from a central government to more regional power, in this case, the UK. The UK devolved its powers to England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. These countries have had independent parliaments since 1997. Some "reserved powers" have not been devolved from the UK such as foreign affairs, military defense, international and  economic policies. This change of power has stirred questions on public spending and tax policies, and is still a debate and event to keep your eye on.

 

I feel that devolution has many benefits that outweigh the negative consequences such as money spending. Countries can function in a more independent manner and govern themselves within their defined boundaries in a more efficient way. This topic and article gives greater insight to our political unit and provides great insight for each country's respective parliament.

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Up in Smoke part 1: the beginning of the end for slash-and-burn farming? – video

The first in a series of videos on the consequences to the Honduran rainforest of slash-and-burn farming.

Via Samuel Reeves, Matthew Wahl
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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Political Geography | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 26, 2015 11:08 AM

This article reminds us all of the growth-stunt that colonialism in Africa brought to the continent.  It is not surprising to see that most African countries still depend heavily on their old colonial masters for survival.  People who may casually follow African politics might think that colonialism started with the Berlin Conference and ended in 1990 or so, but one could argue that it hasn't ended due to the urgent dependency African countries still have on their old colonizers.  Africa might be the most beautiful continent in the world but has the worst story of any in the world.

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50 Common Misconceptions - mental_floss on YouTube (Ep.1) - YouTube

A weekly show hosted by John Green, where knowledge junkies get their fix of trivia-tastic information. This week, John debunks 50 common misconceptions that...
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The History and Future of Everything -- Time - YouTube

How much time do you have left? Time makes sense in small pieces. But when you look at huge stretches of time, it's almost impossible to wrap your head aroun...
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Irish History in 6 Minutes - Manny Man Does The History of Ireland - YouTube

Like Manny Man on Facebook: http://goo.gl/WrSqDW Follow John D Ruddy on Twitter: http://twitter.com/johndruddyactor Subscribe on Youtube: http://www.youtube....
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Winners & Losers - Episode 1: Countries - YouTube

Introducing new my series: Winners and Losers. In this first episode, I look the countries of the world. Music by Kevin MacLeod - http://incompetech.com/musi...
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Why Korea Split Into North and South Korea - YouTube

A video explaining why the country of Korea split into two different countries: North Korea and South Korea.
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10 Countries That Don't Officially Exist - YouTube

10 Countries That Don't Officially Exist It'd be nice to have your own country, but only if other people recognise you, find out more in 10 countries that do...
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Videographic: India, Pakistan and Kashmir - YouTube

An Economist videographic with a brief history of the Kashmir conflict. Added to www.audiovideo.economist.com in November 2009
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New $100 bill: why North Korea won't be very happy (+video) - Christian Science Monitor

New $100 bill: why North Korea won't be very happy (+video) - Christian Science Monitor | Political Geography | Scoop.it
Christian Science Monitor New $100 bill: why North Korea won't be very happy (+video) Christian Science Monitor The Federal Reserve on Tuesday began circulating a redesign of a US currency note that may be the most counterfeited monetary unit in...
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Women in parliament

Women in parliament | Political Geography | Scoop.it

ALMOST 20% of the world’s parliamentary seats are now occupied by women, up from 17.2% five years ago, according to the Inter-Parliamentary Union.


Via Matthew Wahl
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The New World

The New World | Political Geography | Scoop.it

An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.

 

This is great way to show examples of devolution and political instability.  Included are 11 potential scenarios where further fragmentation/disintegration might occur or even greater regional integration that would redraw the map.  These case studies include: Somalia, Korea, Azerbaijan, Belgium and the Arabian Gulf Union.

 

Tags: political, devolution, supranationalism, war, autonomy, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 23, 2012 9:36 PM
Very interesting and informative piece, I found slide (10) especially intriguing with its discussion on the possibility of China claiming parts of Siberia.
Anna Sasaki's curator insight, March 24, 2015 8:53 AM

This article is probably one of my favorites I have read so far. It describes perfectly the political instability still present in the world, and that the globe and its boundaries are constantly changing, never staying put for too long. It surprised me at the new borders which most likely are going to happen, such as the unification of parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Also, the fact that South Korea is subtly getting ready for the reunification of North and South Korea. Also, there may be devolution in Mali and splintering devolution in the Congo's.

This shows devolution as the power in these nations in which are breaking up, such as Belgium and the Flemish peoples. It shows the centrifugal forces behind the breakup of nations, such as ethnicities which vary, or the centripetal forces which bring nations together such as the combination of South and North Korea. 

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:12 AM

Devolution/Fragmentation

 

This article is about nations that could become potentially independent in the near Future, whether due to chronic ethnic incoherence, redrawn governemnt policies, or a growing stateless nation group. Some examples given are an independent Khurdistan, a larger Azerbaijan, and the split of Belgium. 

 

Centrifugal forces are the root of conflict in many countries. These forces include ethnic variety, lack of common language, political instability. These are what may be causing a split in both Belgium (developed country) and Somalia (developing country). There may also be a unification of countries—the map gives an example of the Saudia Arabia, Oman, Yemen, Bahrain, and other melding into one Arabian Gulf Union, of China absorbing Siberia. This does not necessarily herald the presence of centripetal forces, as these countries may be the result of military conquest. 

 

 

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South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | Political Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:08 PM

South Sudan recently gained its independence from Sudan. South Sudan is now home to 10-12 million people and is the 193rd member of the United Nations. However, just because South Sudan became independent from Sudan does not mean it does not no longer carry some of the remaining issues.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:26 PM

This infographic gives an idea of why South Sudan seceded from the rest of the country. Decades of civil war preceded the secession, and it is clear the cultural differences between the two areas were a contributing factor. South Sudan is a part of the fertile Sahel, with the majority of its people Christian, while Sudan is mostly desert, with the majority of its people Muslims. South Sudan, as a new nation, faces a number of difficulties. Its new government needed to remain stable to focus on nation building, but war has broken out between the government and a rebel faction. South Sudan, should it become stable again, should work to improve the education of its people, as the infographic explains, since the vote to secede needed symbols rather than words due to only 15% of its people being literate.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:05 PM

South Sudan has separated itself two years ago from the rest of Sudan. Its powers have become acknowledged by other countries and its messages to the outside world are ones of peace.