Harlem Renaissance By: Patrick
541 views | +0 today
Follow
Harlem Renaissance By: Patrick
Harlem Renaissance
Curated by Patrick
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Patrick
Scoop.it!

Answer to: How does the Harlem Renaissance affect people today? Connecting topic To Today #2

Answer to: How does the Harlem Renaissance affect people today? Connecting topic To Today #2 | Harlem Renaissance By: Patrick | Scoop.it
without the Harlem Renaissance there would be no rap, R&B, hip-hop music today or black artist, authors, actors, etc.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Patrick
Scoop.it!

Duke Ellington Primary source #3

Duke Ellington Primary source #3 | Harlem Renaissance By: Patrick | Scoop.it
Duke Ellington biography and discography. A history of Jazz before 1930. This site contains over 1000 songs from this era in Real Audio 3 format, as well as hundreds of biographies and discographies of Jazz musicians.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Patrick
Scoop.it!

Website On HR #2

The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural movement that spanned the 1920s and 1930s. At the time, it was known as the "New Negro Movement", named after the 1925 anthology by Alain Locke. Though it was centered in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City, many French-speaking black writers from African and Caribbean colonies who lived in Paris were also influenced by the Harlem Renaissance.[1][2][3][4]

The Harlem Renaissance is unofficially recognized to have spanned from about 1919 until the early or mid 1930s. Many of its ideas lived on much longer. The zenith of this "flowering of Negro literature", as James Weldon Johnson preferred to call the Harlem Renaissance, was placed between 1924 (the year that Opportunity: A Journal of Negro Life hosted a party for black writers where many white publishers were in attendance) and 1929 (the year of the stock market crash and the beginning of the Great Depression).

Until the end of the Civil War, the majority of African Americans had been enslaved and lived in the South. After the end of slavery, the emancipated African Americans began to strive for civic participation, political equality and economic and cultural self-determination. Soon after the end of the Civil War the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871 gave rise to speeches by African American Congressmen addressing this Bill. By 1875 sixteen blacks had been elected and served in Congress and gave numerous speeches with their new found civil empowerment. The Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871 was renounced by black Congressman and resulted in the passage of Civil Rights Act of 1875, part of Reconstruction legislation by republicans. By the late 1870s, democratic whites managed to regain power in the South. From 1890 to 1908 they proceeded to pass legislation that disenfranchised most Negros and many poor whites, trapping them without representation. They established white supremacist regimes of Jim Crow segregation in the South and one-party block voting behind southern Democrats. The Democratic whites denied African Americans their exercise of civil and political rights by terrorizing black communities with lynch mobs and other forms of vigilante violence[5] as well as by instituting a convict labor system that forced many thousands of African Americans back into unpaid labor in mines, on plantations, and on public works projects such as roads and levees. Convict laborers were typically subject to brutal forms of corporal punishment, overwork, and disease from unsanitary conditions. Death rates were extraordinarily high.[6] While a small number of blacks were able to acquire land shortly after the Civil War most were exploited as sharecroppers.[7] As life in the South became increasingly difficult, African Americans began to migrate North in great numbers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Patrick
Scoop.it!

Website On H #1

Website On H #1 | Harlem Renaissance By: Patrick | Scoop.it
BIO Classroom provides free educational materials designed to encourage the use of biography in the classroom and to help students explore the lives of those who have made an impact on our world.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Patrick
Scoop.it!

The Harlem Renaissance’s Effect on Modern Culture | Teen Essay Connecting topic To Today #1

The Harlem Renaissance’s Effect on Modern Culture | Teen Essay Connecting topic To Today #1 | Harlem Renaissance By: Patrick | Scoop.it
The black culture that we see around us today is made up of many layers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Patrick
Scoop.it!

A Black Man Talks of Reaping by Arna Bontemps : The Poetry Foundation Primary source #2

A Black Man Talks of Reaping by  Arna  Bontemps  : The Poetry Foundation Primary source #2 | Harlem Renaissance By: Patrick | Scoop.it
I have sown beside all waters in my day. / I planted deep, within my heart the fear / that wind or fowl would take the grain away. / I planted safe against this stark, lean year.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Patrick
Scoop.it!

Harlem Renaissance Vocabulary

Harlem Renaissance Vocabulary | Harlem Renaissance By: Patrick | Scoop.it

1)Strictures – criticism

2)Renown – fame

3)Ideologues - a person who adheres to a system of ideas that form a base for something; esp. one who is uncompromising and dogmatic

4)Harangued - to lecture someone at length in an aggressive and critical manner

5)Resplendent - shining brilliantly

6)Promenades - a leisurely walk taken in a public place so as to be seen by others

7)Remonstrated - make a forcefully reproachful protest

8)Pathos - an actual life experience that evokes pity, sadness, or compassion

9)Gusto - enjoyment or vigor in doing something

10) Ad-libs - speak or perform in public with out previously preparing one's

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Patrick
Scoop.it!

Website On HR #3

The Beat Generation : Writers from the Beat Era of American Literature...
more...
No comment yet.