Hardships and Living Condidtions
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LETTER

My letter!

LaShenae' Shaineece Wheeler's insight:

Dear, New Generation

 

Many people look at me a think about my pass. They wonder how I made it through the Great Depression as a hobo. Well for those who are interested here is a letter to inform you on how I did it. I was an 18-year-old girl living in Oklahoma where everything was going well. My father was a farmer/ stalk marketer, and my mother was a lawyer. My parents worked very hard to save up money for my sister and I college funds. To save the money my father placed his money into banks. They were making a good amount of money to support my little sister and I.  Just as I thought life was getting better. Things started to go down hill. Bank closure and banking industry collapse. As banks were closing, new ones were opening. Some of the effects of the crash on banking are that depositors tried to withdraw their money, and many banks did not have enough money on hand so they failed. The depositors who had not already gotten their money when banks failed lost everything. After my dad realized that we could not handle the closing of banks we had to move to the city. We became Okies, for those who do not know what Okies are they are people who moved to the city from Oklahoma after the dustbowl. With my father being a farmer, since our live hoods had been foreclosed we had to pack up and move to the city. Oh I didn’t mention the disaster that occurred before all this even happened. The dustbowl hit. The dustbowl was a mixture of drought, erosion, and economic depression. Only couple of states in the U.S. was affected by it the most, which was Colorado, Texas, Kansas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. My parents passed away in the dust bowl, so all that I had left was my little sister. We were staying were ever we could to survive. Crime rates went up, because people were dying from starvation. People were also passing away from jumping of the trains. Prostitution rates went up because desperate women was doing what ever they could to make ends meet, and to take care of there families. My little sister and I stayed in a hoover Ville that was made up of tints and shacks. Homerville’s were a shantytown built by unemployed and destitute people during the Depression of the early 1930s. By than I was 26-years-old. Unemployment rates went up. Even though I was old enough to get a job, times were hard an in the 30s women could not get a job. I felt like my little sister and I still need some income to survive so I became a prostitute to pay my bills. There would be nights where we starve because we didn’t have any money to get food. Thank GOD for breadlines. Breadlines are a line of people waiting to receive free food. Many times the line would be curved blocks away, and when they ran out of bread that’s it, you have to try to find another line. My days usually were busy; I never had the chance to do things that I wanted because all I was worried about was surviving. Many times I stay up at night to make sure my sister gets a good sleep and is comfortable. Everyday I prayed that things would get better and it did. As years went by things started to get better. More people were getting jobs so unemployment rates went back down. The towns were looking better, more houses instead of Homerville’s. After while things were back how they use to be. So I encourage you all today to never give up, and to the young people that think that there going through a lot your not know that it could be way worse. You try living through the Great Depression. Though you feel like you want to get up its not worth it because the “Best is yet to come”.

 

                           Sincerely,

Lashenae Wheeler

 

 

 

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iMovie: Hardships and Living Conditions 1930s

Hardships and Living Conditions
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Erica Benson's comment, February 4, 2013 8:22 PM
Great song choices!
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Primary Doc. #1: Hoovervilles

Primary Doc. #1: Hoovervilles | Hardships and Living Condidtions | Scoop.it
LaShenae' Shaineece Wheeler's insight:

Hoovervilles: A crudely built camp put up usually on the edge of a town to house the dispossessed and destitute during the depression of the 1930s.

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Todays Website #1: Economic Problems Facing the U.S. | Economy In Crisis

Todays Website #1: Economic Problems Facing the U.S. | Economy In Crisis | Hardships and Living Condidtions | Scoop.it
LaShenae' Shaineece Wheeler's insight:

This website talks about how the U.S. is facing economic disasters, on a scale few nations have ever experienced. We no longer use produce, what we need to substain ourselves.

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Historical Website #1: City Life During the Great Depression

LaShenae' Shaineece Wheeler's insight:

This website talks about how life was difficult for farmers during the Great Deoression. Farmers whose livelihoods had been foreclosed packed up and moved to cities. Many cities ran out of money so they was forced to pay employees in scrip.

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Todays Website #2: The high cost of 401(k) hardship withdrawals - Milliman Insight

Todays Website #2: The high cost of 401(k) hardship withdrawals - Milliman Insight | Hardships and Living Condidtions | Scoop.it
The hard financial consequences of making a hardship request.
LaShenae' Shaineece Wheeler's insight:

This website talks about how we went into a resession in the year 2010. It also talks about how the unemployment rate went from 4.6% in 2007 to 9.6% in 2010.

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Primary Doc. #2: Stories from the Great Depression

The National Archives Southeast Region presents stories from survivors of the Great Depression overlaid with powerful pictures from era.
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Historical Website #3: Social and Cultural Effects of the Depression [ushistory.org]

Historical Website #3: Social and Cultural Effects of the Depression [ushistory.org] | Hardships and Living Condidtions | Scoop.it
Social and Cultural Effects of the Depression
LaShenae' Shaineece Wheeler's insight:

On this website I learned that many did anything they had to in order to feed themsleves and make a iving. Death rose because people were dien from starvation. Prostitution rose so that desperate women could pay their bills, and take care of there families.

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Historical Website #2: Dustbowl

LaShenae' Shaineece Wheeler's insight:

This website talks about the Dustbowl. The dustbowl was a mixture of drought, erosion, and economic depression. I learned that only a couple of states in the U.S. effected by it the most which was Colorado, Texas,Kansas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. The dustbowl was vey devastating in the U.S.

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