Hamlet 3
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Why didn't Hamlet become king? - The Guardian

Why didn't Hamlet become king? - The Guardian | Hamlet 3 | Scoop.it
The Guardian
Why didn't Hamlet become king?
The Guardian
... was perfectly plausible that a cunning usurper could have stepped into the gap left by the dead king's grieving, depressed son and, with the support of the queen, won the necessary votes.
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Chamdawg's comment, June 6, 2013 11:59 PM
I find this article very intriguing. According to my own understanding, Claudius occupied the throne instead of prince Hamlet because the country of Denmark needed a leader as they were still hostile with Norway, therefore a military leader was needed, and prince Hamlet would have filled that role, however he was studying in England, so to avoid any conflict to be initiated between other countries, Claudius was made king. It was a tactic used so that neighbouring countries might not think that something is rotten in the state of Denmark and take advantage of the chaos. This is my opinion of what happened before the play, however this article does present some new ideas that inform me of other theories as to why Hamlet didn’t become king.
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Shakespeare's Hamlet: productions for their own time | The ...

This week the actor Jonathan Slinger, who in the last 10 years has played many of Shakespeare's leading roles including Richard III, Prospero and Macbeth, is taking on Hamlet at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre.
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Lachlan Holmes's comment, June 5, 2013 10:03 PM
in one of the productions mentioned, hamlet was portrayed as a strong man being "six foot three and broad" this is interesting as in that production hamlet must have been seen as a physically dominant man, and this doesn't necessarily reflect his thinking and renaissance man nature./
Groth the Sloth's comment, June 5, 2013 10:04 PM
It was quite enlightening to be endowed with such personal insight and perspective of somebody's ideas and thoughts as to why their own performances, interpretations and contextual understandings allowed them to portray the play in such unique means, and through the analysis of historical interpretations, to gain a more rounded and informed opinion to gain insight into the way Hamlet should be portrayed to appeal to and symbolise a real humanity; an extensive, and modern audience.
Nicholas Cage's comment, June 5, 2013 10:04 PM
That's true, that is good question. dilemma--> what is more important, to portray a Hamlet to the audience that is relatable to their age, or focus more on portraying a Hamlet that sticks to the original context and text?
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York Shakespeare Project presents Hamlet, July 18 to 20, July 24 to 27 and ... - The Press, York

York Shakespeare Project presents Hamlet, July 18 to 20, July 24 to 27 and ... - The Press, York | Hamlet 3 | Scoop.it
The Press, York
York Shakespeare Project presents Hamlet, July 18 to 20, July 24 to 27 and ...
The Press, York
DIRECTOR John Topping is two weeks into rehearsals for York Shakespeare Project's summer production of Hamlet in a church.
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P-D's comment, June 5, 2013 10:05 PM
“The play is over 400 years old but its central concerns – bereavement, revenge, betrayal, action, truth, the supernatural and the meaning of life – seem as fresh as ever. The human condition doesn’t change.”...Shakespeare knew that the central concerns of humanity do not changes (as he would have observed), this is why the play has been very successful.
P-D's comment, June 5, 2013 10:05 PM
*do not change
Josh Bendit's comment, June 6, 2013 11:54 PM
@P-D I don't think that all the central concerns are still valid today, i.e. I don't think that people feel as strong a duty to their religion and I think the notion of vengeance isn't the same today
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Mind Blowing Books: Hamlet

A Book Review of Hamlet. Should everyone read it? God, yes.
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Joey's comment, June 6, 2013 7:53 AM
As Joel mentioned, the writer's statement, "I have seen the play on stage twice, watched the film and listened to a radio production" implies that previous to other interpretations, the writer had no interaction with the play - and thus, even their initial view of the play was heavily influenced by the interpretations of others.

I also partially agree with the criticism of the "ending plot device", however, being of a vastly differing context to the original, we may be ignorant - perhaps it was entirely possible or common in the original time.
Lachlan's comment, June 6, 2013 8:03 AM
He makes good points about watching a movie of Hamlet in that you can understand the intonation of the actors but he also shows that watching the movie doesn't really allow the meaning to truly sink in. Helpful to keep in mind whilst we are studying Hamlet.
Yaaannnnnnn's comment, June 7, 2013 12:24 AM
The writer mentions: "during a duel they somehow manage to swap swords?! This seems such a random, unbelievable course of events, almost as if it were just a device to make sure that both characters die."
Like Mitch said, the play showed us a good way of how the swords were swapped. I suppose it is up to the actors / interpretation as to how this is done. I do agree with his writing, it does come out of no where to end the play. But then again, it had to end somewhere.
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Media - Changing interpretations of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' - splash.abc.net.au

Media - Changing interpretations of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' - splash.abc.net.au | Hamlet 3 | Scoop.it
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David Hall's comment, June 6, 2013 7:53 PM
Boys, have a listen to this ABC radio program, read through the activities as you listen and complete the post listening activity. It will help shape your understanding on the varying perspectives of Hamlet
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Shakespeare's Hamlet | Crisis Magazine

In the cosmic struggle between good and evil, Shakespeare presents the relentless conflict between two philosophies that shape the human condition. The philosophy of Claudius, the usurping tyrant who secretly poisoned ...
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Lachlan's comment, June 6, 2013 7:57 AM
I don’t think the author of this article is correct in saying that the death of Hamlet’s father and quick marriage of his mother “hints of foul play” to Hamlet. In his first soliloquy, the thought that his uncle has killed his father does not enter his thoughts. It is not until he sees the ghost of his father that he starts to contemplate whether his uncle has killed his father.
I also disagree with the quote that says “Hamlet cannot wantonly kill Claudius at the slightest opportunity even though such a moment presents itself when the king appears contrite and in prayer…” Hamlet chooses not to kill Claudius when he thinks he is praying because he believes that if he killed him then, Claudius would go to heaven and thus he would not truly be avenging his father as he states “…now I’ll do’t. And so he goes to heaven…He took my father grossly…and am I then revenged,/To take him in the purging of his soul,/ When he is fit and season’s for his passage?”
Elongated's comment, June 6, 2013 5:18 PM
I really like the viewpoint they take on Claudius, as a man who: " is the godlike arbiter of life and death, and he is determined to rape Fortune for his selfish ambitions", and when he dies "The scheming Claudius discovers that might is not right, man is not god, man does not dictate the future, and the end does not justify the means." Wondering if the phrase 'hoist by his own petard' was coined by Shakespeare.
Devendran Moodley's comment, June 7, 2013 12:07 AM
I like the stance the author takes by saying that Claudius is a 'usurping tyrant' and that Hamlet is 'a servant and creature of God'. Reinforces the notion/perspective that Hamlet is a 'thinker' who takes an intellectual response to the events that occur.
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THEATER REVIEW | "Hamlet" by Theatre Coup d'Etat: A production where the ... - Twin Cities Daily Planet

THEATER REVIEW | "Hamlet" by Theatre Coup d'Etat: A production where the ... - Twin Cities Daily Planet | Hamlet 3 | Scoop.it
THEATER REVIEW | "Hamlet" by Theatre Coup d'Etat: A production where the ...
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Elongated's comment, June 6, 2013 5:21 PM
never quite seen the death of Claudius like the way they described. here it seems more like he's simply a man who bravely accepts the revenge he's been given, but Claudius didn't seem to get much of a voice or reaction in the book or play, and simply died very quickly, as opposed to Gertrude who took the same poison who managed to rattle of a short series of death throes 'conveniently' warning Hamlet of the poison.
Aaron Hutchinson's comment, June 7, 2013 12:13 AM
similar to the production we saw. This production places strong emphasis on how the actors performed, "a good story well (and simply) told.
Chamdawg's comment, June 7, 2013 12:18 AM
I quite like how this version of hamlet broke the fourth wall, much like David tenant’s version and the sport for jobe production. It’s interesting that Horatio is a girl; however I feel that it is irrelevant whether Horatio is a man or not, to Hamlet in the play Horatio is a friend. In the play Hamlet is considered a misogynist because he treats the two women in the play with spite, however this does not reflect his attitude towards all women, the fact that he jumps in Ophelia’s grave proves to me that he really cared for her. Therefore if Horatio his friend was a woman in the play, Horatio would not be hated by Hamlet.