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Dan Pink: How Teachers Can Sell Love of Learning to Students

Dan Pink: How Teachers Can Sell Love of Learning to Students | haipxing | Scoop.it
“ As education grows and changes educators have the opportunity to change the way they envision their roles and their classrooms.” Jobs in education, Pink said in a recent interview, are all about moving other people, changing their behavior, like getting kids to pay attention in class; getting teens to understand they need to look at their future and to therefore study harder. At the center of all this persuasion is selling: educators are sellers of ideas.
Via Gust MEES, haipxing
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Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, May 21, 2014 2:37 PM

The author of Drive talks about how to use these theories in education! 

Allan Shaw's curator insight, May 21, 2014 6:04 PM

'One of the big topics Pink tackles in his current book is the idea of moving from transactions to transcendence — to making something personal. That’s the best way to “sell” students on what they’re learning, Pink maintains. This has been a recurring theme in education: connecting what’s taught in classrooms to students’ personal lives. But, as evidenced by current school dynamics, that’s not the way the tide is moving.

“Most of our education is heavily, heavily, heavily standardized,” Pink said. ... The idea that you treat everybody the same way is foolish, and yet the headwinds in education are very much toward routines, right answer, standardization.”

Why is it moving this way? One of the reasons, Pink said, is the “appalling” absence of leadership on this issue. “One of the things that I see as an outsider is that so much of education policy seems designed for the convenience of adults rather than the education of children,” he said.... "Why do we have standardized testing? Because it’s unbelievably cheap. If you want to give real evaluations to kids, they have to be personalized, tailored to the kids, at the unit of one. Standardized testing: totally easy, totally cheap, and scales. Convenient for politicians and taxpayers.”

cioccas's curator insight, May 21, 2014 6:07 PM

Think a lot of this is relevant to teaching language to adults too - supporting autonomy, etc.

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Cobb school district uses polygraphs in investigations

Cobb school district uses polygraphs in investigations | haipxing | Scoop.it
An orchestra director, a special education teacher and a custodian are among the handful of Cobb County school employees who, in recent years, have been given controversial polygraph tests, a unique provision allowed under the district’s discipline...
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Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Universal Design Learning Explained for Teachers

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Universal Design Learning Explained for Teachers | haipxing | Scoop.it

Via Javier Tourón
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Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future

Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future | haipxing | Scoop.it
Students Need Professional Learning Networks, Too Learning to create, manage and promote a professional learning network (PLN) will soon become, if it’s not already, one of the most necessary and sought after skills for a global citizen, and as such, must become a prominent feature of any school curriculum.
Via Gust MEES, haipxing
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A Visual Guide To Teaching Students Digital Citizenship Skills [Infographic]

A Visual Guide To Teaching Students Digital Citizenship Skills [Infographic] | haipxing | Scoop.it
“ While looking for a better way to start teaching students digital citizenship skills, one teacher decided to make a visual guide herself - and share it!”
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Could magnetism make you tell the truth?

Could magnetism make you tell the truth? | haipxing | Scoop.it

The act of deception is probably as old as civilization — not long after humans began communicating, they began communicating lies. Shortly after that, they probably started trying to force others to tell the truth. Modern technology has given us a few options in this arena, from dubious polygraphs to powerful drugs — and now a new study suggests brain interference can work, too.


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Brain decoding: Reading minds

Brain decoding: Reading minds | haipxing | Scoop.it

By scanning blobs of brain activity, scientists may be able to decode people's thoughts, their dreams and even their intentions. Media reports have suggested that such techniques bring mind-reading “from the realms of fantasy to fact”, and “could influence the way we do just about everything”. The Economist in London even cautioned its readers to “be afraid”, and speculated on how long it will be until scientists promise telepathy through brain scan.

 

Although companies are starting to pursue brain decoding for a few applications, such as market research and lie detection, scientists are far more interested in using this process to learn about the brain itself. Gallant's group and others are trying to find out what underlies those different brain patterns and want to work out the codes and algorithms the brain uses to make sense of the world around it. They hope that these techniques can tell them about the basic principles governing brain organization and how it encodes memories, behaviour and emotion.

 

Brain decoding took off about a decade ago, when neuroscientists realized that there was a lot of untapped information in the brain scans they were producing using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). That technique measures brain activity by identifying areas that are being fed oxygenated blood, which light up as coloured blobs in the scans. To analyse activity patterns, the brain is segmented into little boxes called voxels — the three-dimensional equivalent of pixels — and researchers typically look to see which voxels respond most strongly to a stimulus, such as seeing a face. By discarding data from the voxels that respond weakly, they conclude which areas are processing faces.

 

Decoding techniques interrogate more of the information in the brain scan. Rather than asking which brain regions respond most strongly to faces, they use both strong and weak responses to identify more subtle patterns of activity. Early studies of this sort proved, for example, that objects are encoded not just by one small very active area, but by a much more distributed array.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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NSA Whistleblower Reveals How To Beat a Polygraph Test

NSA Whistleblower Reveals How To Beat a Polygraph Test | haipxing | Scoop.it

Russell Tice, the National Security Agency whistleblower who blew the lid open on warrantless wiretapping conducted by the federal government on U.S. citizens post-9/11, says that he took between 12 and 15 polygraph tests during his nearly 20-year-long government career.


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Innocence Blog: Polygraph Tests Contribute to False Confessions in ...

Innocence Blog: Polygraph Tests Contribute to False Confessions in ... | haipxing | Scoop.it
The Innocence Project is a national litigation and public policy organization dedicated to exonerating wrongfully convicted people through DNA testing and reforming the criminal justice system to prevent future injustice.

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Cognitive Polygraph (Woman Disrobing), 2013 (Pen & Ink) by @AlexiKArtist

Cognitive Polygraph (Woman Disrobing), 2013 (Pen & Ink) by @AlexiKArtist | haipxing | Scoop.it

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TotalMad's curator insight, October 19, 2013 3:50 AM

Alexi K -Artist, inspired by comic-books, Futurism, the Dutch Avant Garde, Cubism & loud music:  www.alexik-artist.blogspot.co.uk

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Lies I told to become a spy

Lies I told to become a spy | haipxing | Scoop.it
I thought I was an ideal CIA candidate. But I didn't realize how tricky it would be to hide from the people I love

 

The polygraph screen goes wild. I inhale sharply, my heart pounding.


Via Kathy Dowsett
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Dan Pink: How Teachers Can Sell Love of Learning to Students

Dan Pink: How Teachers Can Sell Love of Learning to Students | haipxing | Scoop.it
As education grows and changes educators have the opportunity to change the way they envision their roles and their classrooms.

 

Jobs in education, Pink said in a recent interview, are all about moving other people, changing their behavior, like getting kids to pay attention in class; getting teens to understand they need to look at their future and to therefore study harder.


At the center of all this persuasion is selling: educators are sellers of ideas.


Via Gust MEES
more...
Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, May 21, 2014 2:37 PM

The author of Drive talks about how to use these theories in education! 

Allan Shaw's curator insight, May 21, 2014 6:04 PM

'One of the big topics Pink tackles in his current book is the idea of moving from transactions to transcendence — to making something personal. That’s the best way to “sell” students on what they’re learning, Pink maintains. This has been a recurring theme in education: connecting what’s taught in classrooms to students’ personal lives. But, as evidenced by current school dynamics, that’s not the way the tide is moving.

“Most of our education is heavily, heavily, heavily standardized,” Pink said. ... The idea that you treat everybody the same way is foolish, and yet the headwinds in education are very much toward routines, right answer, standardization.”

Why is it moving this way? One of the reasons, Pink said, is the “appalling” absence of leadership on this issue. “One of the things that I see as an outsider is that so much of education policy seems designed for the convenience of adults rather than the education of children,” he said.... "Why do we have standardized testing? Because it’s unbelievably cheap. If you want to give real evaluations to kids, they have to be personalized, tailored to the kids, at the unit of one. Standardized testing: totally easy, totally cheap, and scales. Convenient for politicians and taxpayers.”

cioccas's curator insight, May 21, 2014 6:07 PM

Think a lot of this is relevant to teaching language to adults too - supporting autonomy, etc.

Rescooped by haipxing from No Such Thing As The News
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Could magnetism make you tell the truth?

Could magnetism make you tell the truth? | haipxing | Scoop.it

The act of deception is probably as old as civilization — not long after humans began communicating, they began communicating lies. Shortly after that, they probably started trying to force others to tell the truth. Modern technology has given us a few options in this arena, from dubious polygraphs to powerful drugs — and now a new study suggests brain interference can work, too.


Via No Such Thing As The News
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Universal Design for Learning

Brief summary of Universal Design for Learning and all the 7 principles.
Via Javier Tourón
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Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future

Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future | haipxing | Scoop.it
Students Need Professional Learning Networks, Too Learning to create, manage and promote a professional learning network (PLN) will soon become, if it’s not already, one of the most necessary and sought after skills for a global citizen, and as such, must become a prominent feature of any school curriculum.
Via Gust MEES
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9 Ways To Get The Most Out Of Design Thinking

9 Ways To Get The Most Out Of Design Thinking | haipxing | Scoop.it
“How Lippincott the branding and strategy firm behind Coca-Cola's swirl Starbucks's logo and Samsung's global identity fuses creativity and analytics.”
Via Fred Zimny, Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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How to interrogate a suspected terrorist

How to interrogate a suspected terrorist | haipxing | Scoop.it
A highly trained team of US interrogators are waiting for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to tell them about his alleged role in the Boston Marathon bombing.

Via @NewDayStarts
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@NewDayStarts's curator insight, April 25, 2013 12:27 PM

People all over the world want to know whether - and why - a pair of immigrant brothers set off two bombs at the Boston Marathon last week. And a highly trained team of US interrogators are waiting for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to tell them.

The best interrogation tool is a can of Coke on a table.

ME "Spike" Bowman, a former deputy general counsel for the FBI, says offering a suspect something he wants - whether a can of Coke in the beginning or a reduced sentence later - builds rapport.

Once the interrogator establishes a bond with the suspect, things become easier.

"You talk to people who are friendly," Bowman says.

Whatever methods the interrogators in the Boston Marathon bombing investigation have used so far, they appear to have been successful.

Dzhokhar's brother Tamerlan - pictured in his boxing days - died last week

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the 19-year-old sole suspect, has begun to open up.

He is in fair condition at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. In a hospital room, he has reportedly said that he and his brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, acted alone.

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Police view polygraph test as investigative tool - Dickinson Press

Police view polygraph test as investigative tool Dickinson Press Lt.


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Police view polygraph test as investigative tool - Dickinson Press

Police view polygraph test as investigative tool Dickinson Press Lt.


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A User's Guide to the Polygraph Exam

A User's Guide to the Polygraph Exam | haipxing | Scoop.it
July 22, 2007
by Daniel B. Young
There are many examples throughout history of authorities attempting to detect deception. One of my favorites is that of certain priests in India circa 1500 B.C.

Via Concerned Citizen
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First Amendment rights not enough to stop feds from prosecuting polygraph operators

First Amendment rights not enough to stop feds from prosecuting polygraph operators | haipxing | Scoop.it
US federal officials are investigating polygraph teachers who supposedly help job applicants fib their way through government lie detector tests.

Via Professor Al Anon
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5 Secrets For Smarter Education Technology Integration

5 Secrets For Smarter Education Technology Integration | haipxing | Scoop.it
With instructional strategies, data collection, curricular planning, personal communication, and classroom management to consider, where technology fits in to a teacher’s workday isn’t obvious—especially a… (@Mrs_BN @1612204 @TeachThought: 5 Secrets...

Via David Mackzum, Ed.D., Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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