Hackers and cyber culture
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Hackers and cyber culture
Hackers, Cybercrime, Cyberwar, and Hactivism
Curated by Lauren Scime
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The RK-1 Is An Arduino-Based Mobile Robot You Control With Smartphone Swipes | TechCrunch

The RK-1 Is An Arduino-Based Mobile Robot You Control With Smartphone Swipes | TechCrunch | Hackers and cyber culture | Scoop.it
London-based roboticist Evangelos Georgiou wants to offer an open-source platform for helping Arduino hobbyists take their projects mobile, thanks to a remote controlled robot called the RK-1 that combines a programmable Arduino microcontroller...
Lauren Scime's insight:

This is pretty sweet! I want a robot that I can control with my phone...better yet a Roomba where I can control it with my phone when it gets stuck in between the couch and the coffee table :)

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Whodunnit? Conflicting accounts on ARAMCO hack underscore ...

Whodunnit? Conflicting accounts on ARAMCO hack underscore ... | Hackers and cyber culture | Scoop.it

Cyber attack that wiped out thousands of computers belonging to Saudi Arabia's national oil company was the work of a lone hacker ...


Via Jean-Charles Labbat
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Así te siguen el rastro en internet – infografía

Así te siguen el rastro en internet – infografía | Hackers and cyber culture | Scoop.it
Las empresas emplean nuestras pautas de navegación para ofrecernos anuncios que en teoría nos interesan más que otros y también para saber qué nos gusta, cómo somos y qué queremos comprar.

Via Javier Pagès López, David Silva Ramalho
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Innocent Megaupload user asks court to release secret raid documents

Innocent Megaupload user asks court to release secret raid documents | Hackers and cyber culture | Scoop.it
EFF argues he needs the documents to vindicate his Fourth Amendment rights.

 

Kyle Goodwin, the Ohio videographer who was chosen by the Electronic Frontier Foundation as a representative of innocent Megaupload users, has asked a Virginia federal judge to unseal search warrants and other documents related to the January raid on Megaupload's Virginia servers. In a brief filed on Goodwin's behalf, EFF argues Goodwin needs access to the documents to make his case for the return of his property. The civil liberties group also contends that the public has a right to know how the raid was conducted.

 

The government shut down Megaupload because it believes the site was a haven for copyright infringement. But Goodwin has told the court he didn't use the site for piracy. Rather, he used the site as a backup for videos he created in his work as a videographer. Goodwin suffered a hard drive crash shortly before the government raided the Megaupload servers. As a consequence, he says, the servers now contain the only remaining copy of his commercially valuable videos.

 

Search warrants are often sealed to avoid tipping off their targets. But the raid on Megaupload's Virginia servers happened nine months ago and it has received extensive media scrutiny. It's hard to argue with a straight face that the process is still secret. Indeed, the government has already told the courts that the "United States has completed execution of its search warrants," making it difficult to claim the search is ongoing.

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Steam vulnerability can lead to remote insertion of malicious code

Steam vulnerability can lead to remote insertion of malicious code | Hackers and cyber culture | Scoop.it
New attack exploits hidden capabilities of Steam URL handler in some browsers.
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Google Won't Approve Glass Apps That Recognize People's Faces… For Now

Google Won't Approve Glass Apps That Recognize People's Faces… For Now | Hackers and cyber culture | Scoop.it
The potential creep factor of Google Glass is something that the search giant has to mitigate as best it can if it wants that kooky head-worn display to become a mass-market sensation (and even that may not be enough), but a recent announcement...

Via David Silva Ramalho, Lauren Scime
Lauren Scime's insight:

Just because you can do something doesn't mean you should - At least for now Google is opting in favor of privacy over voyerism with its Google Glass...let's hope they stick to their guns here...

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Lauren Scime's curator insight, June 4, 2013 4:57 AM

Just because you can do something doesn't mean you should. At least for now Google is opting to protect our privacy - hopefully they'll hold to this...

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4 Turning Points in Cybercrime History

4 Turning Points in Cybercrime History | Hackers and cyber culture | Scoop.it
From millions of credit cards stolen from a national retailer to attacks conducted by other countries, here's a look at some noteworthy data breaches.

Via David Silva Ramalho
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Rights groups wary as ISPs roll out Copyright Alert System

Rights groups wary as ISPs roll out Copyright Alert System | Hackers and cyber culture | Scoop.it
Privacy advocates and consumer rights groups are keeping a wary eye on a new copyright enforcement mechanism set to be rolled out by major Internet Service Providers.

Via David Silva Ramalho
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Anonymous declares war on WikiLeaks in retaliation for "paywall"

Anonymous declares war on WikiLeaks in retaliation for "paywall" | Hackers and cyber culture | Scoop.it
Overlay prevents access to leaked data unless you tweet, share, pay, or wait.

 

Anonymous, the loose collective of hackers, dissidents, and the disaffected, roared into action in late 2010 to defend WikiLeaks, conducting denial-of-service attacks against MasterCard, Visa, and PayPal in retaliation for the payment processors' decision to block funding of the secret-publishing site. That support appears now to be at an end, with the hacking group outraged that WikiLeaks has placed its data behind a paywall.

 

WikiLeaks first implemented its paywall on October 10th. Most pages on the site were overlaid with a video and a banner imploring readers to "Vote WikiLeaks" and donate money to the site. Donating, sharing the video on Facebook, or tweeting about the campaign, would dismiss the overlay and allow access to the site. The overlay also disappears automatically after a period of time. After an immediate backlash on Twitter the overlay appeared to be removed within hours of its first appearance, but it returned on the 11th.

The reappearance of the overlay provoked an angry response from Anonymous representatives. The group claims to have been betrayed by WikiLeaks. The group's statement argues that numerous Anons have been charged or arrested over activities supportive of WikiLeaks, and that in contrast, no member of WikiLeaks staff has been charged or imprisoned.

 

Those charged include 14 Anonymous members who were indicted for the denial-of-service attacks of December 2010, and Jeremy Hammond, who provided WikiLeaks with e-mail pillaged from private intelligence company Stratfor. Those e-mails are now behind the WikiLeaks paywall, a move that "dishonors" and "insults" Anonymous. Anons "risk lengthy prison sentences" in their defense of WikiLeaks, but in return, WikiLeaks is "prostituting" the data that they have provided.

 

Concluding, the statement says that in the future the group will cease putting itself at risk to defend WikiLeaks and its founder, Julian Assange, and instead publish information through its own network of leak sites.

 

Justifying the call for donations, Assange wrote that the fund-raising was necessary to fund its "publishing and infrastructure costs," and further to fund its legal action against the payment processors. WikiLeaks' Twitter account also said that an overlay that allows you to share, tweet, or wait—or pay—isn't a paywall anyway.

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