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Page for My AP Human Geography Course
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Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.


Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.

Via Seth Dixon
Gaëlle Solal's curator insight, April 1, 12:58 PM

ça vous en bouche un coin?!


Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, April 14, 6:00 PM

This shows the costums that several other Countries use in north America we cross our legs but in Countries Like Asia disrespectful. In America we view blowing or Noise is normal in Japan that Considered rude

Roman M's curator insight, April 16, 12:17 PM

This article shows the different customs on gestures or body language in the world. What we might do is disrespectful in another country. For example, even some as simple as crossing your legs while sitting is common in North America and some European countries. However, it is viewed disrespectful in Asia and the Middle East.


Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education

Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."


Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.

Via Seth Dixon
Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 10:41 AM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 


This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 12:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.


This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:40 PM

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 12:01 PM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 21, 4:28 AM

This is an alternative to using "Where children sleep" as an introductory activity. 

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education

Generate Simple World Maps

Generate Simple World Maps | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Free travel tip and photos from all over the world...


This map is not a professionally produced map and that is the beauty of this website. Virtually anyone can make a 1-feature world map by simply clicking on a checklist all of the countries you want highlighted on your map. Second, open the file and add some text and a few lines to label it. This took less than 20 minutes to make with no need for any cartographic or GIS experience.

Via Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 30, 2012 10:04 PM

This map is not a professionally produced map and that is the beauty of this website.  Virtually anyone can make a 1-feature world map by simply clicking on a checklist all the countries you want highlighted on your map.  Second, opened the file and added some text and a few lines to label it.  This took 20 minutes to make with no need for any cartographic or GIS experience  (this PNG didn't compress well, the full image of this map can be seen here).

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education

82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.


This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   


Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.

Via Seth Dixon
Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 8:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:49 AM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:51 AM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Unit 4: Human Population trends and Issues

Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.


This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years

Via Seth Dixon, Cory Capogreco
Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education

Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"

Via Seth Dixon
HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education

Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality

Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"The position [that belief in God is essential to morality] is highly prevalent, if not universal, in Africa and the Middle East. At least three-quarters in all six countries surveyed in Africa say that faith in God is essential to morality.   People in richer nations tend to place less emphasis on the need to believe in God to have good values than people in poorer countries do."

Via Seth Dixon
Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 26, 7:37 PM

It would make sense that Indonesia is one of the most religious countries in the world being that it has the highest Muslim population. Also, I never thought of Europe as being religious countries which is why I am not surprised that 70% of Europe does not believe that the belief in God needs to be moral. Another reason why I am not surprised is because they are more popular for their ethnic groups such as the french group, italian group and german group. Also, they don't have focused religions. For example, Buddhism was originated in Nepal and worshipped mostly in China, Hinduism was originated in India, Jewish was originated in Israel and Islam was originated in Saudi Arabia and it's practiced mostly in Indonesia and Pakistan. That explains why most parts of Asia (at least southern Asia) has practices specific religions.

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 27, 11:58 PM

Summary- This figure explains the relationship between regions and their morality based on a God. It is evident what in North America is is almost a 50 50 tie between between believing in god is essential for morality. Only is Europe does God seem less important than the rest of the world. There are other countries such as Chile, Argentina, or Australia that have these same beliefs, but for the most part, most countries see a believe in God as an essential to morality. 


Insight- In unit 3 we study the distributions of many things, religion included. Why do so many poorer countries have a stronger faith in God than wealthier ones? It may be because if their ethnic backgrounds, but I think there is more to it. I think when a country is poorer, more people reach out to their God for help. I also think that in wealthier countries there are distractions from religion such as video games and other mass produced technologies that get in the way of people researching their faith.

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 9:55 AM

Unit 3: This article shows the relationship between regions and their morality based on a God. It is evident what in North America is is almost a 50 50 tie between between believing in god is essential for morality. There are other countries such as Chile, Argentina, or Australia that have these same beliefs, but for the most part, most countries see a believe in God as an essential to morality. 

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from SocioCultural Geography

The Global Religious Landscape

The Global Religious Landscape | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A country-by-country analysis of data from more than 2,500 censuses, surveys and population registers finds that 84% of adults and children around the globe are religiously affiliated.

Via Seth Dixon, Ju Hui Judy Han
Dean Haakenson's insight:

Wonderful resource for studying religion and region.


Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 21, 2012 3:50 PM

The Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life is one of the best sources for information of culture and religion.  This is a great data set of global religions, complete with maps, charts and graphs.  

Tags: religion, culture, unit 3 culture.

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 26, 2012 6:51 AM

Much more than words...

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, April 13, 2013 8:53 AM

...Imagine all the people living in peace? 

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education

Freedom of the Press

Freedom of the Press | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Freedom House has been at the forefront in monitoring threats to media independence since 1980. A free press plays a key role in sustaining and monitoring a healthy democracy, as well as in contributing to greater accountability, good government, and economic development. Most importantly, restrictions on media are often an early indicator that governments intend to assault other democratic institutions." 


This interactive map shows some intriguing spatial patterns about the freedom of press internationally.  What other patterns to you see in matching up with the most free presses in the world (in green)?  How does a free (or not free press) influence the cultural and political values of a country? 

Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education

Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    


Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.

Via Seth Dixon
Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.