Haak's APHG
1.4K views | +0 today
Follow
Page for My AP Human Geography Course
Curated by Dean Haakenson
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Concrete Consequences

Concrete Consequences | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The more we slap concrete down all over the state, the more we trigger devestating consequences, like the million-dollar flooding in Cranston last September.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 27, 2015 2:29 PM

We often ignore the environmental impact of the cities we build.  When we build a road, building or sidewalk, we usually cover the ecosystem's natural mechanisms for absorbing rainfall with impervious surfaces.  This award-winning environmental article in RI Monthly was written by a geography professor with an eye on the human and environmental interactions between community land use choices and watershed quality.  The RI governor announced for Earth Day that it will be investing funds to tackle the storm water pollution problem.     


Tagsurban, watercoastal, urban ecology, Rhode Island.

Linda Denty's curator insight, May 10, 2015 7:33 PM

This has been known for years and still we keep doing it!

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Who Owns The North Pole?

"Though uninhabited and full of melting ice caps, the Arctic is surprisingly an appealing piece of real estate. Many countries have already claimed parts of the region. So who technically owns the North Pole? And why do these nations want it so bad?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Great question!  I think we all know the answer...Santa Claus!! ;)

Sammy Shershevsky's curator insight, January 17, 2015 4:57 PM

The video discusses a big topic in discussion today - Who really owns the North Pole? Although the North Pole is uninhabited, many countries have claimed to take ownership of the vast majority of land (or, ice). Canada has already claimed that the North Pole is part of its nation. Russia has put up Russian flags on the North Pole (such as underwater) but does that really make North Pole a Russian territory? The media plays a role in this by offering different opinions on who should and who deserves the right to own the North Pole. You might read a Canadian article that lists all the outright reasons why the North Pole is or deserves to be a Canadian territory. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 7:26 PM

In my opinion, I don't understand how the United nations can be seen as an entity that, essentially, controls who would have rights to a place like the North Pole(technically, not owned by anyone).  I, naively, understand the basics of the U.N.  In short, it is an organization that was formed, post-WW I or II, as a governing board for world-issues.

 

 With that being said, how can they believe that their "law" is the all-powerful one?  If I'm a leader of a country who is not a member of the U.N., do I really care what they say?   I just find it odd that this narrator speaks about the issue while holding the U.N. as a supreme authority.  I know that this video is just a quick fun type of video but it leaves me with wanting to hear the perspective of a non-U.N. member.  But a very interesting topic, none the less.

 

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Korea and the Yellow Sea

Korea and the Yellow Sea | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
While city lights at night serve as a good proxy for population density, North Korea provides a dark exception.

Via Seth Dixon
Dean Haakenson's insight:

Amazing photo! Population density is a good issue but also political geography and economic geography as well.

more...
서병기's curator insight, November 6, 2014 7:03 PM

We should try to alleviate the great difference of the North and South Korea. It's time to cooperate.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 25, 2014 10:59 AM

The contrast between North and South Korea in this Earth at Night image shows just how different these countries are. South Korea, with aid from the United States, is becoming a highly developed and prosperous power, with a impressive economy compared to what it was just decades ago. On the other hand, North Korea is dark, both literally and figuratively. North Korea's economy remains highly undeveloped, and the few utilities that the country provides are unreliable and not far stretching. The only visible bright light in North Korea is the city of Pyongyang, and even that is nothing compared to Seoul.

 

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:16 PM

Devastated by the war that secured its independence, South Korea entered the 1960's as a third world country. Today, it is one of the strongest economies in the world, with a vibrant culture and strong allies in the US and Japan. The economic growth it experienced in the final decades of the 20th century is nothing short of remarkable, thoroughly earning its title as an "Asian Tiger" economy. The quality of life enjoyed by its citizens, and the nation continues to prosper in the face of aggression shown by its northern neighbor. The leaps and bounds made in the South Korean economy and its infrastructure is highlighted by this map, showing the intense amounts of development that have occurred all over the country- there isn't a dark spot in the entire southern half of the Korean peninsula. Contrasted to North Korea, its particular striking- the two nations have really taken opposite paths since the end to hostilities between the two in 1953. Should they be able to avoid another conflict, South Korea will only continue to prosper as we push forward into the 21st century.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Who Owns The North Pole?

"Though uninhabited and full of melting ice caps, the Arctic is surprisingly an appealing piece of real estate. Many countries have already claimed parts of the region. So who technically owns the North Pole? And why do these nations want it so bad?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Great question!  I think we all know the answer...Santa Claus!! ;)

Sammy Shershevsky's curator insight, January 17, 2015 4:57 PM

The video discusses a big topic in discussion today - Who really owns the North Pole? Although the North Pole is uninhabited, many countries have claimed to take ownership of the vast majority of land (or, ice). Canada has already claimed that the North Pole is part of its nation. Russia has put up Russian flags on the North Pole (such as underwater) but does that really make North Pole a Russian territory? The media plays a role in this by offering different opinions on who should and who deserves the right to own the North Pole. You might read a Canadian article that lists all the outright reasons why the North Pole is or deserves to be a Canadian territory. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 7:26 PM

In my opinion, I don't understand how the United nations can be seen as an entity that, essentially, controls who would have rights to a place like the North Pole(technically, not owned by anyone).  I, naively, understand the basics of the U.N.  In short, it is an organization that was formed, post-WW I or II, as a governing board for world-issues.

 

 With that being said, how can they believe that their "law" is the all-powerful one?  If I'm a leader of a country who is not a member of the U.N., do I really care what they say?   I just find it odd that this narrator speaks about the issue while holding the U.N. as a supreme authority.  I know that this video is just a quick fun type of video but it leaves me with wanting to hear the perspective of a non-U.N. member.  But a very interesting topic, none the less.

 

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

East Asia's maritime disputes

East Asia's maritime disputes | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A race for energy resources makes unresolved territorial disputes more dangerous in both North-East and South-East Asia

Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, Japan, East Asia.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:48 PM

I couldn't view this content. Its "cookies" were unable to read my computer.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:04 PM

Oil resources in the South China Sea are fueling territorial disputes over small islands and territorial waters. China, in order to claim these oil plays for itself, is claiming islands all over the sea. Extending its EEZ will ensure these oil plays. Many of these islands are no more than coral atolls, but China is arguing that they belong to it because of its measures to develop some of these islands. One resort islands and weather stations are being constructed in order to provide some sort of legitimate claim to these places. Also, by claiming these islands and expanding the EEZ, China is trying to claim other countries' EEZs as its own. While China is the powerhouse of the region, many fear that land grabs may turn into military action. 

 

As long as the world is reliant on fossil fuels, territorial disputes will continue and possibly grow in number. Dependency on a non-renewable resource will eventually lead to more regional and global arguments. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, April 12, 2015 3:26 PM

The dispute between The north and South of asia are evident. in a global perspective this territorial battle in somewhat may affect global development as far as trading with the United states. It will affect global interests, and this is why the senator kerry as i recall has made countless trips to help resolve the issues between the two North east and the South to come into an agreement to help because they dont want to loose energy resources and disturb the security that has been provided its a very tough situation.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.

 

This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?

 

Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.