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Human Settlement Predictive Model

"Simulating climate conditions over the last 125,000 years and predicting how those changes would have allowed humans to spread around the globe, this video models human migration patterns." Read more: http://ow.ly/lWIp304qZEo


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 3:14 PM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 18, 12:11 AM
Some interesting modelling based on climate change. I wonder what it would look like based on something different? Cultural differences? What came first culture or climate?
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 9:02 PM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

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Human Population Through Time

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’s resources, even as we approach 11 billion?

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ROCAFORT's curator insight, December 6, 2016 2:14 AM
Human Population Through Time
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, December 6, 2016 2:23 PM
Pour la DNL seconde
 
Jordyn Reeves's curator insight, January 11, 3:44 PM
This relates to our topic by showing that our population is growing rapidly. By the time 2025 there will be more than 11 billion people on the Earth. But we have enough resources to last us.
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Fertility Rates-Differences Within Countries

"An important aspect about country level data of fertility to keep in mind is that there can be considerable heterogeneity within countries, which are hidden in the mean fertility which were discussed in this entry. The mean Total Fertility Rate for India in 2010 was 2.8 (UN Data): But this average hides the fact that the fertility in many Southern Indian regions was below 1.5 (which is similar to the mean fertility in many European countries), while the fertility in Northern India was still higher than 5 children per woman (which is as high as the mean of the African countries with the highest fertility)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 23, 2016 2:05 PM

This is a stunning example of uneven development and regional differences within countries.  Too often we discuss countries as if the situation inside the borders of one country is the same throughout it, even if the geographic contexts can be wildly different. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why are the fertility rates in so different in northern and southern India?  How does this regional imbalance impact the country?  What are other examples of major differences within a country? 

 

Tags: regions, population, demographic transition model, declining populationmodelsunit 2 population, India, South Asia. 

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Stats that reshape your world-view

With the drama and urgency of a sportscaster, statistics guru Hans Rosling uses an amazing new presentation tool, Gapminder, to present data that debunks several myths about world development. Rosling is professor of international health at Sweden's Karolinska Institute, and founder of Gapminder, a nonprofit that brings vital global data to life.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 2015 3:01 PM

It is never a bad time to hear from Hans Rosling.  In this TED talk he shares data that shows how popular myths about the less developed world (especially fertility rates and life expectancy) have radically changed in the last 40 years.


Tags: gapminder, development, TED.

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:04 PM

It is never a bad time to hear from Hans Rosling.  In this TED talk he shares data that shows how popular myths about the less developed world (especially fertility rates and life expectancy) have radically changed in the last 40 years.


Tags: gapminder, development, TED.

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How the Global Population Boom Really Began

How the Global Population Boom Really Began | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The Industrial Revolution gets credit for kicking off the world's human population explosion, but new research suggests we should look further back.

 

“If you dig further in the past," Stutz told Emory University, "the data suggest that a critical threshold of political and economic organization set the stage around the start of the Common Era. The resulting political-economic balance was the tipping point for economies of scale: It created a range of opportunities enabling more people to get resources, form successful families, and generate enough capital to transfer to the next generation.”


Tag: population.


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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, January 3, 2015 7:29 PM

Homo Sapiens evolved around 130,000 to 160,000 ago, so why did it take until 1804 to reach 1 billion and only 195 years to reach 6 billion? The Industrial Revolution is usually agreed upon as the major catalyst for this population boom. However, WHY is the Industrial Revolution given credit for the population boom and  what else could have caused this? Population growth began with cities which in this case refers to any sort of settlement. Food surplus allows for people to do other things than hunt and gather. This allowed  for the creation of population centers, society, hegemonic class systems, and the economy.  As long as their was a food surplus there could be a population surplus. So the better people were at getting/making food, the more the population grew. So the population boom could actually be attributed to the ability to create a food surplus. The agriculture revolution spured this allowing for the domestication of farm animals and primitive  farming equipment. The population to continue to grow. The industrial revolution made these technologies many times better. This allowed for a greater food surplus resulting in a stronger economy  and standard of living which ALL results in ... A FASTER GROWING POPULATION.

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The 4 Stages of Demographic Transition- AP Human Geography | Enforcedstorm4

The 4 Stages of Demographic Transition- AP Human Geography | Enforcedstorm4 | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
This was created for Mr. Loveless's AP Human Geography class Written, Directed, and Edited by: Robby Sykes.
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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 7:28 PM

The yellow represents desert and with no rainfall what are you going to grow. the white area is the area that gets plenty of rain, good farmland for raising livestock, excellent natural harbors and resources. the yellow upper part probably is not desert but I bet its cold up there.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:08 PM

this seems like the same sort of situation that Egypt has, it seems like a good sized area but the large deserts make most of it uninhabitable, the country's livable space is much less than you would think.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:17 PM
What we have here is a representation of the desert area that only 2% of the population lives in, this is because to sustain life, you need high amounts of water to grow food which will never happen here and then the white being the mainly inhabited areas. These areas are mainly inhabited because of sufficient rainfall which makes agriculture good and good enough to sustain populations of people.
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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:25 PM

After analyzing this map and looking at the busiest cities and countries in the world I believe this statement to be true. China a giant and very populated country, India is also within the top ten and so is Japan. Once all these have been looked at you can clearly tell that this area of the world is easily the most populated. Many of the other countries and nations have large swaths of land that are very lightly populated. This is a robust area of the world and in some cases the most expansive.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:33 PM
It surprises me how many people live in just that one circle! it is hard to believe or probably explain to someone that with all the other space in the world, that the circles region has more people in it than what is not circled. Although, it could be validated by more reliable or more sources, because with the world that we live in now, numbers can easily be forged. I do believe though that 51% of the world's population does live here.
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:58 PM

This is perhaps the most intriguing map I've been able to analyze. Could it be possible that more people live in that circle than out of it? The world is HUGE and to think the majority of the population resides here, is truly incredible. India, has a huge population living in there for such a small area. Currently, India has over 1 billion people living there making it the second most populous country before China with 1.3 billion. China has a bigger surface area than India and it is interesting to know how these areas compare. The important issue with India is the fact that, with so many people, there is a lack of housing and sanitation unavailable to provide to so many people. The facts are giving that India suffers from overpopulation, clearly, this image has to be true.

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PopulationPyramid.net

PopulationPyramid.net | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Population Pyramids of the Whole World from 1950 to 2100 — PopulationPyramid.net

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Sweet!

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dilaycock's curator insight, April 20, 2013 3:57 AM

Choose a country and easily see how it's population has changed and is predicted to change.

Sally Egan's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:36 AM

Fantastic way to show population pyramids for different countries /regions of the world. 

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Black Marble: The Earth at Night

Black Marble: The Earth at Night | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
“Nothing tells us more about the spread of humans across the Earth than city lights.”...

 

"For three weeks spread out over April and October of this year, the Suomi NPP satellite (jointly of NASA and NOAA) scanned all the Earth's land as it appeared at night. Scientists then mapped the satellite's data -- 2.5 terabytes of it -- over an earlier Blue Marble image, transforming that picture's daytime blues, browns, and greens into a nightime palette of blues, blacks, and gold." 

 

This video is a great compliment to the classic Earth at Night composite image as well as the adjusted cartogram for population density.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What do these lights "tell us" about human geography?  What does the intensity of the lights indicate?


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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

 

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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Younger Africa

Younger Africa | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Across Africa, a continent where the average age is about 19, protests have flared against leaders who may have outstayed their welcome.

 

This interactive mapping feature compares two distinct data sets in an attempt to show that the two are correlated on the continent of Africa.  The base layer of this thematic map is demographic, noting how much of the overall population in a given country is under the age of 16.  The interactive feature with point data describes the political unrest or instability in that particular country. 

 

Questions to ponder: Does the cartographer 'convince' you that Africa's having a very young (globally speaking) demographic cohort led towards greater political instability?  Are there other factors worth considering?  What does this map and it's embedded data tell us?    

 

Tags: Africa, political, conflict, unit 4 political, states, governance, population, demographics, unit 2 population. 


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The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


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Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 21, 2014 1:10 AM

Intro to liveability

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Population, Sustainability, and Malthus

In which John Green teaches you about population. So, how many people can reasonably live on the Earth? Thomas Malthus got it totally wrong in the 19th century, but for some reason, he keeps coming up when we talk about population. In 1800, the human population of the Earth passed 1 billion, and Thomas Malthus posited that growth had hit its ceiling, and the population would level off and stop growing. He was totally right. Just kidding, he was totally wrong! There are like 7 billion people on the planet now! John will teach a little about how Malthus made his calculations, and explain how Malthus came up with the wrong answer. As is often the case, it has to do with making projections based on faulty assumptions. Man, people do that a lot.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 4:15 PM

This is a succinct summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHGunit 2 population

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Why Malthus Is Still Wrong

Why Malthus Is Still Wrong | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Why Malthus makes for bad science policy

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 2016 9:53 AM

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated and inspired some policies that were especially damaging.  This anti-Malthusian op-ed was written by the Publisher of Skeptic Magazine; I typically pair this with the neo-Malthusian op-ed written by the  President of the Canada's Population institute.  Comparing and contrasting the merits of these articles provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tagsop-ed, demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 6, 8:05 AM
What did Malthus get right? and what did he get wrong?
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The Top Language Spoken Globally in 2050 Will Be...

The Top Language Spoken Globally in 2050 Will Be... | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"French is currently ranked sixth among world languages, after Mandarin Chinese, English, Spanish, Hindi and Arabic. But it is gaining speakers quickly and, the study reports, will be spoken by 750 million in 2050, up from 220 million today. A demographic boom in French-speaking African states could bump the percentage of global French speakers from 3 percent to 8 percent by 2050, but some skeptics think the predictions are overrated."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 25, 2015 8:08 AM

I can't verify the projections in the article, but the thought exercise is a great exploration into future global geographies. As some populations are shrinking, others and still growing very quickly and it is clear that the future has the distinct possibility that the linguistic composition of the world might be very different from today.  


Questions to Ponder: Considering current trends, what do you think the world will be like in the future?  What will be better?  What will be worse? 


Tags: language, culture, demographics

Treathyl Fox's curator insight, October 13, 2015 7:57 PM

"A boom in these African states could bump the percentage of global French speakers from 3 percent to 8 percent by 2050."  You don't say?  So glad to know the French language might get in the driver's seat for most spoken world language. Love the language.  Resided in Maryland USA from 1988 to 1995 and there was a school there that taught the children in French. At the time it seemed odd. But guess the educators were thinking ahead! Score!

The Language Ctr's curator insight, October 17, 2015 11:17 AM

Just count the people in China and you have an idea why their language is the top language spoken. However, English of course is known worldwide as the language of business. #languages 

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Adventures in Population Growth

Adventures in Population Growth | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"The International Database at the US Census Bureau [provides] population estimates broken down by country, age and year for essentially every country. [With this data we can track] shifts in population makeup over time. I’ve created a few interesting graphs to show the expected shifts over the next 35 years, including the dependency ratio."


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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 5, 2015 8:18 PM

GTAV AC:G Y10 - Geographies of human wellbeing

CD - The reasons for spatial variations between countries in selected indicators of  human wellbeing

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:30 PM

This is an example on the population growth and development from the recent years of technological innovation.

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:04 PM

This article has some excellent animated graphs and population pyramids to show some of the demographic changes that countries will be experiencing from now until 2050.  These animated GIFs are perfect teaching images.  


Tag: population, demographic transition model, APHG.

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A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"In a paper published Thursday in Science, demographers from several universities and the United Nations Population Division conclude that instead of leveling off in the second half of the 21st century, as the UN predicted less than a decade ago, the world's population will continue to grow beyond 2100."


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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:23 AM

It is interesting to see the demographic transition model in real life effect. As time passes, underdeveloped countries will enter stage 3 of the demographic transition model and see a decline in birth rate and death rate remains relatively low. Most developing countries now will enter the very end of stage 3 and even stage 4 as birth rates balance of death rates. The real question is whether or not Earth will be able to sustain 11 billion people. It is scary to see the world in a rapid population boom. This population growth relates to the agricultural unit in that the use of GMO's is to accommodate the rapidly growing populations in the world.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, September 8, 2015 9:25 AM

The population was originally predicted to level off in the next half century, but this is not the case by a long-shot, as predicted by the UN.

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:12 PM

These articles from the Guardian and National Geographic were the first I'd heard of the new population projections for the future.  For many years it was assumed that the global population would level out at around 9 billion; while that is still within the range of possibilities but these new projections indicate that it is much more likely that the total global population will be much higher than that.  The geographic implications of this are far reaching.   

 

Tag: population, demographic transition model, unit 2 population.

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Disruptive Demographics

Disruptive Demographics | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Last night I had the pleasure of attending a tremendously entertaining and incredibly informative professional development evening at the APHG reading (that isn’t an easy combination to pull of either, and he did marvelously). Dr. James Johnson is a trained geographer teaching in the School of Business at the University of North Carolina.  His talk, entitled “Disruptive Demographics: Implications for Global Competitiveness” (PDF file available here) follows in a tradition of superb presentation at the reading; in 2012, Roger Downs gave a great professional development presentation on geographic expertise.

 


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Dennis V Thomas's curator insight, June 3, 2014 9:45 PM
great overview of America's changing demographics!
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World Population Prospects

World Population Prospects | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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LeeBurns's curator insight, February 11, 2014 5:20 AM

#unit4 #population

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 1:27 PM

This graph depicts the estimated population growth throughtout the years of 1950-2100. Age has a lot to do with the increasing rate by millions. The people that are 65+ represented in the green are "peaking old" at 2080. As for the 15-64 age braket they are represented in the red and are reaching the "Adult peak" at the year 2030. And lastly, the "Peak Child" is represented in the blue achieves that in 1990. All of these statistics stem from the Brazilian records and are relative to the daily life and climate of the specific group or individual.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 2014 5:56 PM

Looking at the statistics for South America’s growth rate since 1950, it has grown rapidly. This rapid growth can easily be attributed to modernization, increased stability within the governments(even if corruption is still rampant in some places and the U.S. isn’t fiddling its fingers in politics or funding government overthrows), and increased outside development thanks to increased global globalization. While total population of the region is expected to rise until it peaks in 2050, so is population density and age. This will create sanitation, infrastructure, and healthcare issues that many parts of the continent may not be ready to address or able to. Even though economic strength is typically on the rise, these are still poorer developing nations. The birthrate is already beginning to peak and taper off even if deaths continue to rise. However, there is still predicted to be more births than death. Improved healthcare globally since 1950 has found its way into South America and so has economic output, bringing with it – immigration. Numbers such as South America’s can be used to create a visual representation by using a population pyramid to figure out which phase of the demographic transition model the region, or with more specific numbers, a country was in, is going into, and will predicable be in.

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Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style

Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"In April, the Associated Press decided the word 'illegal' should only be used to describe actions, not people. It's one of several major news outlets that have been reconsidering how to refer to people who are in this country illegally."  

 


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Al Picozzi's comment, July 21, 2013 12:53 PM
It all goes along with the old saying, the victors write the history books. If the US lost the American Revolution it wouodl probably been called the American Insurrection. Also look at the Civil War as we mostly call it today. Many places, especially in the Southern states call this the War for Southern Independence or the War of Norther Aggression.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:19 PM

I thought that NPR broadcast  was perpetuating the problem we face today in news media.  They spent there time talking about certain individuals and how they used their words instead of addressing and informing us about the issue of immigration. Labeling is an easy way of separating a human being from the situation, Illegal immigrant is easier to portray negatively in the news.  An illegal sounds better then a disadvantaged Mexican refuge in search of the same American dream our founding fathers were trying to create when the agenda is to close the boarders

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 8:16 PM

It is interesting to see that not only the topic of Immigration is controversial,  but the terms being used for that topic is also a sensitive subject.

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Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister

Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Taro Aso says he would refuse end-of-life care and would 'feel bad' knowing treatment was paid for by government

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Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:30 AM

Its clear that Japan is overpopulating. People are living long lives in a big country like Japan and people just keep reproducing. The Japense  minister in my opion is very wrong here. A minister should never wish deaths upon his people.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:11 AM

As populations age and the younger generations have less children the burden of government to provide care for the elderly becomes a big issue.  In countries where the government pays for their health care this will only become a bigger issue.  When the needs of the old and the needs of the young become a conflict what is a country to do?  These issues will only increase as the birth rates of developed countries declines.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:41 AM

What this government minister said is repugnant, but his comments strike directly at the most serious issue facing Japan. The Japanese population has become to old to sustain itself. Their are not enough younger people in Japan to sustain future generations of Japanese society. When a society fails to reproduce, it dies out. Japan may be facing extinction in a few generations to come. The increased strain on the government of Japan, will eventually kill it. A state can not support a majority elderly population. The coasts of medical care would drown the government in debt and financial ruin. Many European nations are facing a similar demographic time bomb. If this problem is not corrected, there is a good chance that both European and Japanese society will die out.

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Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.

 

This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?

 

Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.


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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct place and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth