Haak's APHG
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Page for My AP Human Geography Course
Curated by Dean Haakenson
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Adventures in Population Growth

Adventures in Population Growth | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"The International Database at the US Census Bureau [provides] population estimates broken down by country, age and year for essentially every country. [With this data we can track] shifts in population makeup over time. I’ve created a few interesting graphs to show the expected shifts over the next 35 years, including the dependency ratio."


Via Seth Dixon
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 6, 2015 1:18 AM

GTAV AC:G Y10 - Geographies of human wellbeing

CD - The reasons for spatial variations between countries in selected indicators of  human wellbeing

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:30 AM

This is an example on the population growth and development from the recent years of technological innovation.

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 2, 1:04 AM

This article has some excellent animated graphs and population pyramids to show some of the demographic changes that countries will be experiencing from now until 2050.  These animated GIFs are perfect teaching images.  


Tag: population, demographic transition model, APHG.

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World Population Prospects

World Population Prospects | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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LeeBurns's curator insight, February 11, 2014 10:20 AM

#unit4 #population

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 6:27 PM

This graph depicts the estimated population growth throughtout the years of 1950-2100. Age has a lot to do with the increasing rate by millions. The people that are 65+ represented in the green are "peaking old" at 2080. As for the 15-64 age braket they are represented in the red and are reaching the "Adult peak" at the year 2030. And lastly, the "Peak Child" is represented in the blue achieves that in 1990. All of these statistics stem from the Brazilian records and are relative to the daily life and climate of the specific group or individual.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 2014 10:56 PM

Looking at the statistics for South America’s growth rate since 1950, it has grown rapidly. This rapid growth can easily be attributed to modernization, increased stability within the governments(even if corruption is still rampant in some places and the U.S. isn’t fiddling its fingers in politics or funding government overthrows), and increased outside development thanks to increased global globalization. While total population of the region is expected to rise until it peaks in 2050, so is population density and age. This will create sanitation, infrastructure, and healthcare issues that many parts of the continent may not be ready to address or able to. Even though economic strength is typically on the rise, these are still poorer developing nations. The birthrate is already beginning to peak and taper off even if deaths continue to rise. However, there is still predicted to be more births than death. Improved healthcare globally since 1950 has found its way into South America and so has economic output, bringing with it – immigration. Numbers such as South America’s can be used to create a visual representation by using a population pyramid to figure out which phase of the demographic transition model the region, or with more specific numbers, a country was in, is going into, and will predicable be in.

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Business Geography

Business Geography | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Grant Thrall, Ph.D., pioneered a new field of study — business geography — at the University of Florida.

 

Business geography involves using sophisticated technologies to interpret and analyze data to help businesses make decisions.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2013 7:09 PM

I understand that my readers are not people that I need to convince the geo-literacy is an essential component for a 21st century education; but we are the people that need to convince principals, politicians, school administrators, teachers and parents that teaching geography is fundamental.  Consider this an accessible article to use to make the case for geography for someone who sees the educational value from a business perspective.


Tags: edtech, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, geo-inspiration, geography education, models, spatial.

Tony Hall's curator insight, April 16, 2013 2:43 AM

While I find business quite boring, I do understand it's necessity. I think this illustrates very nicely the relevance of studying geography and how it relates to the "real" world. 

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct place and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 18, 2014 12:55 AM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 9:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 9:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

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Name That Grid!

Name That Grid! | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2015 5:06 AM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this one that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         


Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, January 28, 4:35 PM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this one that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         


Tags: urban, models, fun, trivia.

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Intro Animation - Core/Periphery Theory

A quick animated intro video I created to give students a crash course on Core/Periphery Theory. From here the lecture will largely be inquiry based with tea...

Via Luke Walker, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School, mkauls
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Luke Walker's curator insight, October 2, 2013 4:19 AM

Check out this awesome core-periphery model video.

Make a 3 Column Chart in your notes, record qualities of the Core,  Periphery, and semi-periphery.

 

Below the chart, write 3-5 sentences documenting the connection and interaction between the 3 regions.

By the way, what kind of region are the core, periphery and semiperiphery? 

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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:35 AM

This article was great in that it left me with some great visuals and details on each of the models. For me, it's hard to remember each one of the models but this article really allowed me to compare each one and read about each one all in one place. The layout of the article was also nice and I think that it was just a great overall reminder of the models.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:56 AM

This article teaches you mainly about the Burgess and Hoyt Model. It compares the two, and it gives you detailed information on lots of the urbanization terms.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about how geographers drew up cities and made models of how cities were drawn up. It teaches you how they thought back then, and how urbanization has evolved from then to now.

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 9:26 PM
unit 7