Haak's APHG
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Vertical villages are changing the concept of neighborhood

Vertical villages are changing the concept of neighborhood | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Multifamily dwellings in high-density areas are changing the concept of neighborhood.

 

Tags: housing, urban, place, neighborhood, spatial, density.


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Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:13 PM

Unit 7 Urban

       The article describes a vertical neighborhood which is similar to an apartment, but instead has multiple family residences stacked on top of each other. This type of a community helps decrease land use and increases communication between people and creates a sense of community. The residents often interact, see each other, and form deep bonds that would be difficult to do in a street of single family homes.

        As land prices skyrocket and living in a city becomes more expensive the main solution used by architects is to build up. The sky is the limit and there is plenty of space in the sky providing an ideal space for people to live and expand into. However, with the increase of skyscrapers and multi storied buildings, air pollution increases due to the height of the building and any smoke or waste released from the building. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:16 AM

How cool is it that our world is changing every second? Some would say that it sucks and that we need to slow down. But why slow down, so much innovation is happening and we are at the front seat of it. People live differently now rather than sticking with old traditions and it is neat to see how they adjust to high-density areas.

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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 7:28 PM

The yellow represents desert and with no rainfall what are you going to grow. the white area is the area that gets plenty of rain, good farmland for raising livestock, excellent natural harbors and resources. the yellow upper part probably is not desert but I bet its cold up there.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:08 PM

this seems like the same sort of situation that Egypt has, it seems like a good sized area but the large deserts make most of it uninhabitable, the country's livable space is much less than you would think.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:17 PM
What we have here is a representation of the desert area that only 2% of the population lives in, this is because to sustain life, you need high amounts of water to grow food which will never happen here and then the white being the mainly inhabited areas. These areas are mainly inhabited because of sufficient rainfall which makes agriculture good and good enough to sustain populations of people.
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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:25 PM

After analyzing this map and looking at the busiest cities and countries in the world I believe this statement to be true. China a giant and very populated country, India is also within the top ten and so is Japan. Once all these have been looked at you can clearly tell that this area of the world is easily the most populated. Many of the other countries and nations have large swaths of land that are very lightly populated. This is a robust area of the world and in some cases the most expansive.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:33 PM
It surprises me how many people live in just that one circle! it is hard to believe or probably explain to someone that with all the other space in the world, that the circles region has more people in it than what is not circled. Although, it could be validated by more reliable or more sources, because with the world that we live in now, numbers can easily be forged. I do believe though that 51% of the world's population does live here.
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:58 PM

This is perhaps the most intriguing map I've been able to analyze. Could it be possible that more people live in that circle than out of it? The world is HUGE and to think the majority of the population resides here, is truly incredible. India, has a huge population living in there for such a small area. Currently, India has over 1 billion people living there making it the second most populous country before China with 1.3 billion. China has a bigger surface area than India and it is interesting to know how these areas compare. The important issue with India is the fact that, with so many people, there is a lack of housing and sanitation unavailable to provide to so many people. The facts are giving that India suffers from overpopulation, clearly, this image has to be true.

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.

 

Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.

 

By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.


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Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 2014 4:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 5:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:03 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.

 

This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?

 

Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.


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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.