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Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification

Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
One urban planning professor has defined this as a process that occurs in discrete stages.

 

Much has been made of the wave of millennials moving to cities. In intriguing new work, geographer and urban planner Markus Moos of the University of Waterloo gives the phenomenon a name: “youthification.” Moos defines youthfication as the “influx of young adults into higher density” cities and neighborhoods. And in some ways these neighborhoods are “forever young,” where new cohorts of young people continue to move in as families and children cycle out in search of more space.

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic.


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 7:50 PM

As opportunities are continually found in big cities, so too are young people migrating to these prosperous cities. Culture in the youth population has been restructured with new ideas, open mindedness, freedom, and also how the city offers many comforts. They plan out their future in the city because it has so many amenities, with amazing transportation in between other areas. Expectations are raised because young people consider things in different perspectives. New urban developments such as old manufacturing buildings being converted into housing apartments offer the youth suitable living arrangements and accommodations. However, mature populations keep being displaced to the suburban areas, due to different expectations. Older people prefer more relaxation in their lives and they are not very interested in the most advanced technologies. As young people keep moving to the big cities, these highly populated areas have to structure new patterns to develop urban sections.

Cass Allan's curator insight, February 17, 7:45 PM

Changing neighbourhoods

ZiyCharMatt's curator insight, February 20, 12:09 PM

This city talks about which cities in the United States have the largest amounts of young and old residents. This is important because those cities with large amounts of young people (like Austin) are likely to be on the cutting edge of innovation and it is those cities that we can look to to show the rest of the nation the future of urban design. I believe that this article is very interesting and provides a good insight into which parts of the country are advancing quickly and which parts are sating rooted in the past.

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Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality

Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"The position [that belief in God is essential to morality] is highly prevalent, if not universal, in Africa and the Middle East. At least three-quarters in all six countries surveyed in Africa say that faith in God is essential to morality.   People in richer nations tend to place less emphasis on the need to believe in God to have good values than people in poorer countries do."


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God Is.'s curator insight, January 20, 7:49 AM

Interesting data in several different ways...Can draw different conclusions from this, and perhaps shed light on things that need to be modified/changed as it pertains to our belief... A balancing act of sorts...Thank you for curating this... Maybe it will help will cure certain beliefs we hold, individually, and collectively...

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 26, 7:37 PM

It would make sense that Indonesia is one of the most religious countries in the world being that it has the highest Muslim population. Also, I never thought of Europe as being religious countries which is why I am not surprised that 70% of Europe does not believe that the belief in God needs to be moral. Another reason why I am not surprised is because they are more popular for their ethnic groups such as the french group, italian group and german group. Also, they don't have focused religions. For example, Buddhism was originated in Nepal and worshipped mostly in China, Hinduism was originated in India, Jewish was originated in Israel and Islam was originated in Saudi Arabia and it's practiced mostly in Indonesia and Pakistan. That explains why most parts of Asia (at least southern Asia) has practices specific religions.

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 27, 11:58 PM

Summary- This figure explains the relationship between regions and their morality based on a God. It is evident what in North America is is almost a 50 50 tie between between believing in god is essential for morality. Only is Europe does God seem less important than the rest of the world. There are other countries such as Chile, Argentina, or Australia that have these same beliefs, but for the most part, most countries see a believe in God as an essential to morality. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study the distributions of many things, religion included. Why do so many poorer countries have a stronger faith in God than wealthier ones? It may be because if their ethnic backgrounds, but I think there is more to it. I think when a country is poorer, more people reach out to their God for help. I also think that in wealthier countries there are distractions from religion such as video games and other mass produced technologies that get in the way of people researching their faith.

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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


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CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 7:09 PM

Awesome interactive map showing the relative religious composition of states.

Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."

 

Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Joy Kinley's curator insight, November 20, 2014 8:54 AM

Interesting visual representation of language and their relationships.  Language defines us.  It doesn't just give us a way to communicate but it also limits how we define and describe our world.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

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How harsh environments make you believe in God (or gods)

How harsh environments make you believe in God (or gods) | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A new study links climatic instability and a lack of natural resources to belief in moralizing gods in cultures around the world.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 13, 2014 1:58 PM

I’m not posting this in spite of its controversial nature—I am sharing this precisely because it has raised eyebrows.  Many have read this and seen elements of environmental determinism in the cultural analysis of religions (despite the researcher’s insistence that their findings should not be taken as a form of geographical determinism).

While there appears to be a correlation between a belief in moral god(s) and a harsh environment, others could also look at this map and see the mapping of poverty, colonialism or historical evangelism.  Environmental determinism was used to justify colonialism and racist ideologies, geography fully rejected anything with even a hint of environmental determinism.  Geographers are hypersensitive to the critique of environmental determinism; that is why it is difficult to find modern geographic research that knocks on the door of determinism. 


Questions to Ponder: How much environmental determinism is in this research?  What alternatives exist to environmental determinism?  How much of a factor is the environment in shaping cultural patterns? 


Tags: environment, religion, culture,  unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:25 PM

Inspiring faith? Is God an environmental construct?

Kelli Jones's curator insight, December 2, 2014 1:06 AM

This article talks about how where we live can influence our religion. I couldn't agree more. Although I have been an active member of a church for a long time now I can't help but think that if I didn't live in the US I wouldn't be a Christian. If I were born in China for example I may not even know the name Jesus Christ. That's a scary thought. 

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7 of the Best Dialect Quizzes

7 of the Best Dialect Quizzes | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
If you're feeling particularly nationalistic, or just want to see how consistently you speak like your friends and neighbors, here are all the dialect quizzes that I could find. Find out what your dialect most resembles, and, in many cases, help science at the same time!

 

Tags: language, culture, English.


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Julia Kang's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:42 PM

Enligsh dialects looks interesting! If I have a chance later, I want to know more about it :)

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 12, 2014 11:07 AM

Take a few of these quizzes and be ready to share your reaction to your results!

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City of Endangered Languages

"New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:28 PM

This is an excellent video for showing the diffusion of languages in the era of migration to major urban centers.  It also shows the factors that lead to the decline of indigenous languages that are on the fringe of the global economy and the importance of language to cultural traditions.   Here is the article related to the video as well as a BBC article that calls NYC a 'graveyard of languages.'  In a curious twist on the topic of endangered languages, there is a group of Native Americans in Northern California that wouldn't mind seeing their language die out with this generation.  


Tagslanguage, folk cultures, culturediffusionNYC, video.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:30 PM

Is globalisation enabling the preservation and study of declining languages?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:59 PM

I will be showing this in class DO NOT use it for your scoop it review--

 

unit 3

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


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MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:48 AM

APHG-Unit 3

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:13 AM

Great insight into our 5 major world religions.

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 12:06 PM

This is also a good introductory video for the Religion unit.  It will at least give students a general overview of the major world religions as a baseline of information to reference when diving deeper into the unit content.

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The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split

The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The division between Islam's Shiite minority and the Sunni majority is deepening across the Middle East. The split occurred soon after the death of the Prophet Muhammad, nearly 1,400 years ago.

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 27, 2014 9:08 AM

(SW Asia topic 8)

This article provides the 'Sparknotes' of the reasoning for the schism between Sunni and Shia. It all boils down to who was to succeed Mohammed: his bloodline or who the community elected? This quickly turned violent, bearing striking similarity to some of the religious martyrs -both good and bad-  we hear about today. Just think how much the world -especially that of today and Southwest Asia- would have changed if Mohammed had made known who he desired to take his position? It seems as if personal interpretation and sticking to one's faith, as with virtually all religions, is the only feasible solution for now. Though it does not answer the question and leaves a divide, history has proven that ultimately there does lie strength in diversity, and it will be interesting to see how this plays out as it pertains to Islamic sects in the near future.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 1:56 AM

Like many Americans while having heard Sunni and Shiite Islam before I wasn't quite sure what the difference was besides the fact it was seemingly enough to cause centuries of conflict. This article does a good job of providing background for Americans who find themselves distanced or simply poorly informed about the different sects of Islam. A good understanding of this is important especially today when we find ourselves entwined in the business and affairs of the Middle East.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:49 PM

While much of the sectarian violence in places like Iraq has been a result of intentional sabotage by extremist or insurgent forces, the deep historical nature of this split allowed these sparks of violence to become a heavy fight again. Islam is one religion, but the two sects are based on different interpretations of the faith. The two sects have coexisted in relative peace for some time, but the current conflict shows that the fundamental differences still create a huge divide between the sects.

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Culture Ministry Affirms 'Russia is not Europe'

Culture Ministry Affirms 'Russia is not Europe' | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"A state commission working on a much-discussed report titled 'Foundations of State Cultural Politics' will release their findings in two weeks, presidential advisor Vladimir Tolstoi announced last week, adding that the basic formula of the report could be summarized as 'Russia is not Europe.'"


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 12, 6:11 PM

I agree that Russia is not European represented because more than 3 quarters of Russia is located in Asia. In fact, Culture Minister probably doesn't want Russia to be claimed by Europe because that means that Russia has too much territory in comparison to smaller countries such as Monaco, Andorra and San Morino. Plus, it can be too difficult for one politician to have control over a country that is three times bigger than the United States. I'm sure being a president of a country like the United States is hard enough but Russia takes it to a new level. However, Russia does have one of the strongest economies in the world. It's the interest of fairness that Russia can be lacking. In the future, I can definitely see the European side of Russia being claimed by a brand new country.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 17, 3:17 PM

I am most certainly not surprised that Russia does not want to be "Europe" rather a distinct, singular identity. The fact of the matter is, Russia is a proud country and hold a strong sense of nationalism... or at least the politicians and a few other important people do, the heroine addicts just care about there re-up. 

Russia has always had its own identity yet lets not forget that it most certainly entertained western culture during the age of Enlightenment under Peter I, better known as Peter the great. Whether it was the shaving of beards or the building of a navy Russia developed as a nation due to western influences. 

I believe a large reason behind Russian identity is due to its politics and geography. Historically Russia has always focused upon the state and maintenance of power. The strength of the states power is to come at any cost (often the citizens). 

Russia is so proud and take such pride in there identity that they have recently claimed Crimea and are currently backing rebels in the Ukraine in territory disputes. Russia wants to expand and take what they think is theirs or even what was once theirs. Everything is being done in preservation of mother Russia, simply raising the level of nationalism, almost like a propaganda/brainwashing scheme. 

I am interested in seeing how this all unfolds. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 5, 2:06 PM

This article is interesting because Russia, today, now considers itself its own unique area, neither part of the East or West.  This is interesting because in the past, many Russians tried to behave like their western European counterparts (Peter the Great).  In fact, Peter changed Russian practices and made St. Petersburg in an attempt to create a more European image for the country.  However, being far removed from the rest of what people usually think of as Europe (the Western area of the continent), Russia was never perceived as an equal to its smaller idols (such as Great Britain, France, and Germany).  Today it seems as if Russia wants to distance itself from the West, because of being constantly excluded, and the Cold War Period where Eastern Europe (dominated by Russia) was far different than the west.  Yet, Russia does not want to consider itself Eastern, in my opinion, because of the fact that the nation often had conflicts with China (back when it was the USSR over differing versions of Communism).  Russia, today, wants to be thought of as its own unique region, which is fair in my opinion, the country does take up a large portion of the planet.

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Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2014 10:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

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Ancient Eurasiatic ‘superfamily’ found at root of European and Asian languages

Ancient Eurasiatic ‘superfamily’ found at root of European and Asian languages | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Languages spoken by billions of people across Europe and Asia are descended from an ancient tongue uttered in southern Europe at the end of the last ice age, according to research.  The claim, by scientists in Britain, points to a common origin for vocabularies as varied as English and Urdu, Japanese and Itelmen, a language spoken along the north-eastern edge of Russia.  The ancestral language, spoken at least 15,000 years ago, gave rise to seven more that formed an ancient Eurasiatic 'superfamily', the researchers say. These in turn split into languages now spoken all over Eurasia, from Portugal to Siberia."

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The Global Religious Landscape

The Global Religious Landscape | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A country-by-country analysis of data from more than 2,500 censuses, surveys and population registers finds that 84% of adults and children around the globe are religiously affiliated.

Via Seth Dixon, Ju Hui Judy Han
Dean Haakenson's insight:

Wonderful resource for studying religion and region.

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 21, 2012 3:50 PM

The Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life is one of the best sources for information of culture and religion.  This is a great data set of global religions, complete with maps, charts and graphs.  


Tags: religion, culture, unit 3 culture.

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 26, 2012 6:51 AM

Much more than words...

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, April 13, 2013 8:53 AM

...Imagine all the people living in peace? 

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Folk Culture--Tradition


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Rowena Spence Cortina's curator insight, February 2, 6:54 PM

Demonstrates folk culture.  Look for the characteristics of folk culture in this audiovisual rich cultural collage.  

Dennis Swender's curator insight, February 3, 3:29 AM

Provides additional insight into modernity and primordialism concepts found in the Banks text.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, February 16, 7:34 PM

While watching this movie I found the over idea of tradition to be quite accurate because everyone wether they are from Russia, the United States or another country has traditions that come from many years ago. These traditions tell how the people should dress, sleep, work and eat all in the eyes of God. Traditions come from a group and then are passed on for generations, everyone has some type of tradition wether it is in their family or in another community. Tradition helps the people to gain an identity for themselves so he knows and everybody else knows who he is as well as what God expects. The main focus in this movie is not only tradition but also to please and have God in mind at all cost.

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Mapping World Religions


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Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 7, 8:18 AM

Summary - This video shows the birth places of religions and their diffusion over time. It shows the diffusion of the major wold religions by expanding their color, and using a timeline giving a great representation by their spread over time. No religions began in America or any other countries in the western part of the world. They all began in the east. Throughout diffusion, you can see christianity is the major religion that crossed over the seas spreading widely in the west.

 

Insight - In unit 3, one of the major concepts is religion and its diffusion. This map shows just that. By showing the different  world religions and their diffusion over time it is easy to tell where and when these religions became popular.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 26, 9:22 PM

I just finished scooping the belief in God morality chart and it's kind of confusing to know that Christianity started in Europe because 70% of Europe does not believe that the belief in God is moral. I guess it's more of a technicality regarding the difference between Christianity and spirituality. Even though Hinduism started before other major religions, it appears to not have as much impact throughout the world like Christianity and Islam does. It's interesting to know that at the same time Islam was overpowering Christianity and overpowering most of the world, Christianity started going overseas to the United States.

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 12:01 PM

Plan to use this as an introductory piece for the Religion unit.  Have students watch the video and make a series of observations.  Then, divide the class into groups, with each focusing on one religion.  Have them make observations related to their religion.  Have students share their insights using "speed dating" discussions. 

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


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Olivia G Torres's curator insight, November 30, 2014 6:18 PM

This was super awesome!! It's a diagram that lets you zoom into the branches that are religion. Its really cool to see how different religions derived and how some are connected. I think it's really cool to see how many different branches have been made through out the years and just how far back religions went. I really like that you can see the long and sometimes lost roots of the religion.

Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

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Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial, historical and cultural components to it...here are some of my favorite teaching resources to use as Thanksgiving approaches."

 

Tags: Thanksgiving, food, seasonal.


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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 2014 12:13 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the consumption of sweet potato pie on thanksgiving in the u.s. it also shows the production of these pies also. It is also interesting how the south is again labeled and stereotyped in a certain way of being irrelevant or redneck.

This map relates to unit 1 because it shows the functional regions of local sweet potato pie production. It also shows the parts of the south as the most consuming people. Again pinning the south as weak and less educated. This is a possible vernacular map also because of that.

Raven Blair's curator insight, December 2, 2014 7:46 PM

The home of the first Thanksgiving, Plymouth County, is one of three of the only places that produces cranberries.It is interesting how Thanksgiving includes multiple assortments of the geography of food production and food consumption.  

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, January 4, 6:49 PM

Culture Unit 3 - This map shows the spacial relationship of an aspect of thanksgiving in the United States. It demonstrates how even popular culture is not always same throughout a particular area or country. It may actually change around perceptual regions rather than formal regions.

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Do Different Languages Confer Different Personalities?

Do Different Languages Confer Different Personalities? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

LAST week, Johnson took a look at some of the advantages of bilingualism. These include better performance at tasks involving "executive function" (which involve the brain's ability to plan and prioritise), better defence against dementia in old age and—the obvious—the ability to speak a second language. One purported advantage was not mentioned, though. Many multilinguals report different personalities, or even different worldviews, when they speak their different languages.

It’s an exciting notion, the idea that one’s very self could be broadened by the mastery of two or more languages. In obvious ways (exposure to new friends, literature and so forth) the self really is broadened. Yet it is different to claim—as many people do—to have a different personality when using a different language. A former Economist colleague, for example, reported being ruder in Hebrew than in English. So what is going on here?


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor, Irvin Sierra
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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, December 3, 2013 3:36 AM

I guess it is more about being better equipped for life. There is a belief that those who know two or more languages are better equipped for life. It is not that they are more intelligent, rather it is about having a good social aptitude,  and being better communicators!

Irvin Sierra's curator insight, November 12, 2014 10:33 PM

This article relates to the subject of language that we are looking at in class because it conveys if different languages mean different personalities. We were talking basically about this last class where they're some words in Spanish that you wont be able to translate into English. It doesn't mean that people have different personalities it just means that people will be more comfortable with their first language rather than their second language. Language does not reflect on you by your personality but more as your background. 

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The Second Languages Of Every Part Of The World In One Incredible Infographic

The Second Languages Of Every Part Of The World In One Incredible Infographic | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Some of these will surprise you.

 

Tags: language, culture.


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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, November 7, 2014 9:59 AM

any surprises?

Caterin Victor's curator insight, November 7, 2014 2:35 PM

It is never a second language,  my grandmother used to say : "As many languages you learn, is never to much, never enought".!!

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The world as it is: The influence of religion

The world as it is: The influence of religion | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Seldom has it been more important for Americans to form a realistic assessment of the world scene. But our current governing, college-­educated class suffers one glaring blind spot.

Modern American culture produces highly individualistic career and identity paths for upper- and middle-class males and females. Power couples abound, often sporting different last names. But deeply held religious identities and military loyalties are less common. Few educated Americans have any direct experience with large groups of men gathered in intense prayer or battle. Like other citizens of the globalized corporate/consumer culture, educated Americans are often widely traveled but not deeply rooted in obligation to a particular physical place, a faith or a kinship."


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 22, 2014 11:57 AM

Religion and its influence

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:19 PM

Unit 3

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 12:17 PM

My APHUG students will read this article before even beginning our study of religion.  My hope is that this may at the very least help them empathize with the religious fervor that still has such a profound impact on the culture of much of the world.  

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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


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CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 7:09 PM

Awesome interactive map showing the relative religious composition of states.

Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

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Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts

Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

A 'retronym' is a term specifying the original meaning of word after a newer meaning has overtaken it.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 3, 2014 9:06 AM

unit 3

God Is.'s curator insight, May 3, 2014 1:15 PM

Some of you might appreciate this article.. Darn I feel old! LOL

A.K.Andrew's curator insight, May 6, 2014 8:32 PM

Fantastic images for our modern day terms.

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Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace

Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
An international relations scholar is using her students' love of food to teach them about global conflicts. It's a form of winning hearts and minds that's gaining traction among world governments.

Via Seth Dixon
Dean Haakenson's insight:

Thanks Seth Dixon!

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 2014 3:37 PM

The way to world peace may be through our stomachs. Great idea!

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 2014 3:38 PM

The way to world peace may be through our hearts and stomachs. Great idea!

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:58 PM

Vínculos Poderosos! Pilares da Geografia Vivida.

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The Great Language Game

The Great Language Game | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Challenge yourself to identify some seventy languages by their sound alone. Learn more about how languages sound and where they're spoken.

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:59 AM

A game where you can test your knowledge of global tongues only by sound.

The knowledge of languages is important in movement especially for migrants and immigrants and participators in global trade.

Debi Ray Kidd's curator insight, July 21, 2014 4:52 PM

Make sure you look up the languages that you don't know to determine where they're spoken.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:20 PM

unit 3-- use in class

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America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas

America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Provo, Utah, and Burlington, Vermont, represent opposite ends of the U.S. religiosity spectrum.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2013 11:07 AM

The majority of the most religious metros are concentrated in the South or Utah.  This particular weekend, many of the rythmns of urban life in Utah cities are remarkably visible as the LDS church holds it's semi-annual General Conference.  On the opposite side of spectrum, 5 of the 10 least religious metros are in New England; the west coast is the other center of diminished religiosity (with a mini-center in Colorado). 


Questions to ponder: What cultural patterns help to partially explain the levels of religiosity in the United States?  What other factors explain the patterns of religiosity in your in your local area? 


Tags: USA, culture, religion, Christianity.

Lyn Leech's comment, August 23, 2013 5:45 PM
The fact that as you get more westward (disregarding Utah,) religion looses popularity has to do with the people who, in the past, migrated there. It could be argued that super-religious people back in the old days who came from England to escape religious prosecution tended to get to the east coast and then settle there, whereas people who didn't have a church as a tether would be more likely to go out east to look for gold and things. It's an interesting map, regardless and the west's seeming lack of religion may be due to the fact that most of the population of the US is based on the east, due to extreme conditions in the west such as mountains and deserts.