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Page for My AP Human Geography Course
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AP Human Geography Review Material


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, May 7, 10:42 AM

This is worth your while to look at HUGGERS!

Joy Kinley's curator insight, May 7, 11:34 AM

For those of you needing AP Human Geography review this is a good one.

Michael Martin's curator insight, May 9, 6:36 PM

Hey students:  Check out this Prezi for REVIEW. Yay!

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Gentrification as Adoption?

Gentrification as Adoption? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"OTR A.D.O.P.T. transfers abandoned buildings to qualified new owners at reduced cost.  The catch? You must commit to rehabilitating the property and returning it to productive use. You must also demonstrate an ability to successfully complete such a project.  A.D.O.P.T.-Advancing Derelict and Obsolete Properties Through Transfer."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 3, 2:42 PM

This banner was spotted by Laura Spess, an urban geographer in Cincinnati in during the 2014 APHG reading.   The Over-The-Rhine neighborhood is very close to the reading, and the urban renewal here is quite controversial.  Many point to the economic positives and infusion of investments, while other see social displacement of the poor.  After the reading we were discussing the messages embedded the sign (and the urban landscape).  The OTR ADOPT organization conceptually thought of poorer neighborhoods as orphans and that the gentrification process should be likened to adoption.  While the merits and problems of gentrification can be debated, I find that particular analogy painfully tone deaf and wasn't surprised to find the organizations website, well, derelict and obsolete.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Why might this analogy be problematic?  How might current residents of the community feel about the message? 


Tags: neighborhoodlandscape, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicAPHG, Cincinnati

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Adventures in Population Growth

Adventures in Population Growth | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"The International Database at the US Census Bureau [provides] population estimates broken down by country, age and year for essentially every country. [With this data we can track] shifts in population makeup over time. I’ve created a few interesting graphs to show the expected shifts over the next 35 years, including the dependency ratio."


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Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 12:52 PM

I. International Database for the US Census Bureau created graphs representing population estimates broken down by country, age, and year. These graphs show the population shifts over 35 years of major countries. 

 

II. Developed nations show a column shape with a pointed top. Developed nations have equal amounts of males and females, and have a higher population of 30-50 year olds. With a high number of middle aged people and a low number of elderly people, developed nations remain stable due to a stable birth rate and death rate. Developing countries have a pyramid shaped population, with many young people and few 50-100 years olds. This leads to a weak economy as their is high unemployment. Developing countries also have overall higher populations, which leads to poverty as their is a lack of resources. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 11:31 AM

UNIT 2 POPULATION
This article depicts various population pyramids in developing, as well as developed countries. These pyramids show trends from the past, as well as predictions for the future (2050). With population pyramids, it is easy to understand how populations shift, as well as observe different trends on populations. I really like studying the information given to us by population pyramids, so this article is very important to me. This whole thing relates to historical trends and projections for the future. 

Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 5, 8:18 PM

GTAV AC:G Y10 - Geographies of human wellbeing

CD - The reasons for spatial variations between countries in selected indicators of  human wellbeing

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The 4 Stages of Demographic Transition- AP Human Geography | Enforcedstorm4

This was created for Mr. Loveless's AP Human Geography class Written, Directed, and Edited by: Robby Sykes.
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The Human Imprint

The Human Imprint | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A Human Geography Resource; Especially for Teachers

 

The Human Imprint is home to everything Human Geography related for the student, educator, and the every day Joe/Jane. This site includes geographic related stories, lesson plans, and other links that bring us closer to understanding the “why of where.”


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SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 7:58 AM

Words leading to new Geography treads.

good for up to date articles.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 6:54 PM

Unit 1

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:15 PM

course resource

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APHG Review Guides

APHG Review Guides | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 2, 2013 1:16 PM

It's that time of year to really buckle down; several teachers have created PDFs versions of review guides for the May 17th AP Human Geography test.  James Nelsen, a veteran APHG teacher has produced a “grand review.”  This resource intentionally does not come with a key to force the students to delve deeper and search for the answers themselves.  Allison Hunt had her students create their own study guide for the APHG test focusing on the ‘big ideas.’  Best of luck and these and other resources are archived on my "thematic" tab on http://geographyeducation.org.

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Geography and the Common Core

Geography and the Common Core | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
In 2010, most states in the United States (including Rhode Island) adopted the Common Core State Standards as the new standards.   The two main portions of the Common Core Standards are the English...

 

Will geography be permanently pushed out of the curriculum with the adoption of the Common Core?  How can a teacher bolster spatial thinking and geo-literacy within the Common Core framework?  If you've asked yourself these questions, this resource is for you. 


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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:39 PM

This article is under intellectual/arts in the United States, because it is about education. It talks about how the standards of the common core are spreading and how this will affect geography.

 

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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.


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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 25, 2013 7:50 PM

Useful to develop understanding of the models of urban landuse zones within cities.

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London's Dominance Becomes A British Election Issue

London's Dominance Becomes A British Election Issue | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"London completely dominates the political, cultural and economic life of the U.K. to an extent rarely seen elsewhere. That imbalance has been an issue in the run-up to Thursday's election."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 8:37 AM

The problems with primate cities are hardly unique to London (see here resources for teaching about primate cities using the example of Mexico City).  The lack of a balanced urban hierarchy that we would see in countries where the rank-size rule applies is a political problem as stated in this NPR podcast.  This additional BBC article bemoans Britain’s lack of a true second city, arguing that London’s shadow looms too large for sustained national development outside of the primate city. 


Tags: APHG, urbanunit 7 cities, megacities.

Blake Joseph's curator insight, May 6, 6:02 PM

I remember seeing a road map of the United Kingdom once and wondering why almost every single road eventually seemed to make its way to the massive urban sprawl of London in the country's southeast. Even cities as far away as Inverness in Scotland or Belfast in Northern Ireland seemed to inevitably revolve around the massive capital. Having such a dominance on the country, I can see why other distant communities are gradually losing interest in the political and economic influences London still has on them, especially if other closer urban centers are greatly growing in population and influence. The recent election for Scotland's independence from England shows that even today many people are looking to branch out away from London's reach, and that these reasons are perhaps not totally influenced by historic tensions and rivalries between the two places. Populations centers like Birmingham and Manchester have grown immensely in the last decade, and with that has came a growing independent sense of culture and identity as well. Residents in smaller towns and villages feel that these other closer  urban areas would be a better representative of them in country-wide politics than distant London. Some of these distant communities are nearly 500 miles away from London. That is like Detroit, Michigan being politically and economically dominated by New York City. Even with London being massive in size and influential reach, I can see why far away towns in the U.K. don't always consider London too important.

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AP Human Geography FRQs

AP Human Geography FRQs | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Based upon student reactions to their multiple choice exams, I can tell that the types of questions are NOT, 'choose the correct definition for the vocabulary term.' Instead, the types of questions are leading towards giving an example of a real world phenomenon and then requesting students to tell which term best applies. And though I have not seen an actual test, it sounds like the kids were saying that the questions require more reading than the answers (I would actually prefer that to the alternative)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 10:46 AM

This article (with the outstanding infographic above) from the Human Imprint is an excellent primer to get students ready for the APHG exam.    


TagsAPHG, infographic.  

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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:45 PM

We talk about McDonalds as a way of Americanizing the rest of the world. These foods show that it may still be the case but local culture is still infused and desired where McDonalds expands to.

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, January 21, 9:40 PM

This shows that mmcdonals is a global industy . there are many mcdonalds everywhere they put a spin oncertain diishes to match their heritage like in japan instead of hamburger meat like we americans use the use crabs.It just really shows how far mcdonalds was changed from just starting in america to being featured all over the globe

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 7:06 PM

I've lived and traveled to a few places especially Asia.  I've had the Ramen at McD's in Hawaii along with the Portugeuse sausage that comes with the big breakfast.  I've also experienced Japanese McD's.  It was nice to be able to find some of the regular food like a burger and fry at any McD's in the world, but I never ordered anything else. 

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Disruptive Demographics

Disruptive Demographics | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Last night I had the pleasure of attending a tremendously entertaining and incredibly informative professional development evening at the APHG reading (that isn’t an easy combination to pull of either, and he did marvelously). Dr. James Johnson is a trained geographer teaching in the School of Business at the University of North Carolina.  His talk, entitled “Disruptive Demographics: Implications for Global Competitiveness” (PDF file available here) follows in a tradition of superb presentation at the reading; in 2012, Roger Downs gave a great professional development presentation on geographic expertise.

 


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Dennis V Thomas's curator insight, June 3, 2014 9:45 PM
great overview of America's changing demographics!
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Graduate Program Scholarship

Graduate Program Scholarship | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

This is a five-course part-time program that can be completed in less than one year. Offered through the Elmhurst College Online Center, the program is fully online in eight-week sessions.  This program correlates directly with the College Board AP® Human Geography."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 18, 2013 11:27 AM

NCGE has recently announced that they are willing to offer scholarships to reduce the cost of Elmhurst College's Graduate Certificate Program in Human Geography for AP.  Each course is $1950 per class, and every NCGE member that is a current teacher can receive a scholarship of $600 (reducing the per course cost down to $1350 per class).  Not currently a member of the NCGE?  Join today. 


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APHG Study App

APHG Study App | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"App4Success APHuG is an intuitive app for students to excel in AP Human Geography. Created by two students who scored 5 on all their AP Exams, the app is organized by the topics* indicated by the College Board."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2013 3:20 PM

I'm not an iPhone or iPad user, but this $1.99 app has received good reviews from within the APHG communities.  Please share in the comments section any feedback. 

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God Grew Tired of Us

God Grew Tired of Us | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

The story of the "Lost Boys" of Sudan is a heartbreaking and inspiring tale of youth caught in cultural and geopolitical conflicts and fored to leave their homes. The film God Grew Tired of Us " tells a moving story of young people overcoming incredible challenges and struggling to improve their own lives and those of family and friends left behind."  Linked here is a lsson plan from National Geographic "to teach students about concepts of migration, cultural mosaics, sense of place, and forces of cooperation and conflict among communities" using this 90 minute documentary.  The film can be viewed online on HULU as well as other media outlets.  

 

Tags: culture, Africa, political, conflict, war, migration, development, APHG. 


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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct place and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.