Haak's APHG
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Why is EU free movement so important?

Why is EU free movement so important? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Where did the idea of free movement of people come from? The precursor to the EU was formed as European leaders came together in the wake of the Second World War, wanting to prevent another catastrophic war. The idea was that allowing people to move across the continent - from countries where there were no jobs to countries where there were labour shortages - would not only boost European growth, but would help prevent war by getting people to mix more across borders.

"The founding fathers of the European Community wanted it to be a construct that also had a political integration and for that you needed people to move because the minute people crossed boundaries and borders, you had deeper integration… So it was both a social as well as an economic aim.

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, mobility, political, states, migration.


Via Seth Dixon
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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, August 15, 2015 4:39 PM
A great read
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 11:57 AM

Immigration is a major source of tension within Europe. The influx of immigrants into Europe has led to a nativist backlash in many nations. The free movement of people is a bedrock principle of the European Union. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the leaders of Europe hoped that the open borders policy would  prevent another costly war by allowing people to move to were there were jobs were located. The mixing of cultures would also prevent war. People would develop an understanding of other cultures, which would make the possibility of war more remote. The leaders did not account for the strong nativist strand that often runs through many nations. The UK is threating to withdraw from the EU over this immigration issue. While immigration on the United States gets much of the attention, a more serous crises is actually occurring in Europe.

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Why is EU free movement so important?

Why is EU free movement so important? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Where did the idea of free movement of people come from? The precursor to the EU was formed as European leaders came together in the wake of the Second World War, wanting to prevent another catastrophic war. The idea was that allowing people to move across the continent - from countries where there were no jobs to countries where there were labour shortages - would not only boost European growth, but would help prevent war by getting people to mix more across borders.

"The founding fathers of the European Community wanted it to be a construct that also had a political integration and for that you needed people to move because the minute people crossed boundaries and borders, you had deeper integration… So it was both a social as well as an economic aim.

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, mobility, political, states, migration.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, August 15, 2015 4:39 PM
A great read
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 11:57 AM

Immigration is a major source of tension within Europe. The influx of immigrants into Europe has led to a nativist backlash in many nations. The free movement of people is a bedrock principle of the European Union. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the leaders of Europe hoped that the open borders policy would  prevent another costly war by allowing people to move to were there were jobs were located. The mixing of cultures would also prevent war. People would develop an understanding of other cultures, which would make the possibility of war more remote. The leaders did not account for the strong nativist strand that often runs through many nations. The UK is threating to withdraw from the EU over this immigration issue. While immigration on the United States gets much of the attention, a more serous crises is actually occurring in Europe.

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'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste

'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

In the 19th century, London was the capital of the largest empire the world had ever known — and it was infamously filthy. It had choking, sooty fogs; the Thames River was thick with human sewage; and the streets were covered with mud.  But according to Lee Jackson, author of Dirty Old London: The Victorian Fight Against Filth, mud was actually a euphemism. 'It was essentially composed of horse dung,' he tells Fresh Air's Sam Briger. 'There were tens of thousands of working horses in London [with] inevitable consequences for the streets. And the Victorians never really found an effective way of removing that, unfortunately.'"


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Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 2015 4:03 PM

London has come a far way from the industrial town it was in the 19th century, and is now cleaner than ever. But pollution led to many issues in London at the time. This is also evident in the developing world today, such as in China, Africa, and South America.

EuroHistoireGeoAmiens's curator insight, April 11, 2015 3:16 PM

Pas mal en première pour une étude détaillée du Londres de Dickens

Emily Bian's curator insight, May 23, 2015 4:41 PM

This article is about London, UK during the time of Industrial Revolution. The city of London expanded so rapidly, that there wasn't enough time for urban planning. Factories and houses were going up everywhere, and thousands of people migrated to London for jobs. This led to an influx of filth. The air was polluted and there wasn't adequate irrigation systems or waste systems. Everything dirty could be found on the streets like horse dung, and the water would get polluted and unsanitary. 

I liked this article, because it really created an image in my head how terrible and filthy the Industrial Revolution was at the start. 

7)Development and character of cities

Development and character of cities

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Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 11:25 PM

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be linguistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants influence the distribution greatly.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 6:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 15, 2012 2:29 AM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 15, 2012 2:29 AM
thanks for this! we have shared!
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Why is EU free movement so important?

Why is EU free movement so important? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Where did the idea of free movement of people come from? The precursor to the EU was formed as European leaders came together in the wake of the Second World War, wanting to prevent another catastrophic war. The idea was that allowing people to move across the continent - from countries where there were no jobs to countries where there were labour shortages - would not only boost European growth, but would help prevent war by getting people to mix more across borders.

"The founding fathers of the European Community wanted it to be a construct that also had a political integration and for that you needed people to move because the minute people crossed boundaries and borders, you had deeper integration… So it was both a social as well as an economic aim.

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, mobility, political, states, migration.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, August 15, 2015 4:39 PM
A great read
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 11:57 AM

Immigration is a major source of tension within Europe. The influx of immigrants into Europe has led to a nativist backlash in many nations. The free movement of people is a bedrock principle of the European Union. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the leaders of Europe hoped that the open borders policy would  prevent another costly war by allowing people to move to were there were jobs were located. The mixing of cultures would also prevent war. People would develop an understanding of other cultures, which would make the possibility of war more remote. The leaders did not account for the strong nativist strand that often runs through many nations. The UK is threating to withdraw from the EU over this immigration issue. While immigration on the United States gets much of the attention, a more serous crises is actually occurring in Europe.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
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London's Dominance Becomes A British Election Issue

London's Dominance Becomes A British Election Issue | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"London completely dominates the political, cultural and economic life of the U.K. to an extent rarely seen elsewhere. That imbalance has been an issue in the run-up to Thursday's election."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 2015 1:37 PM

The problems with primate cities are hardly unique to London (see here resources for teaching about primate cities using the example of Mexico City).  The lack of a balanced urban hierarchy that we would see in countries where the rank-size rule applies is a political problem as stated in this NPR podcast.  This additional BBC article bemoans Britain’s lack of a true second city, arguing that London’s shadow looms too large for sustained national development outside of the primate city. 


Tags: APHG, urbanunit 7 cities, megacities.

Blake Joseph's curator insight, May 6, 2015 11:02 PM

I remember seeing a road map of the United Kingdom once and wondering why almost every single road eventually seemed to make its way to the massive urban sprawl of London in the country's southeast. Even cities as far away as Inverness in Scotland or Belfast in Northern Ireland seemed to inevitably revolve around the massive capital. Having such a dominance on the country, I can see why other distant communities are gradually losing interest in the political and economic influences London still has on them, especially if other closer urban centers are greatly growing in population and influence. The recent election for Scotland's independence from England shows that even today many people are looking to branch out away from London's reach, and that these reasons are perhaps not totally influenced by historic tensions and rivalries between the two places. Populations centers like Birmingham and Manchester have grown immensely in the last decade, and with that has came a growing independent sense of culture and identity as well. Residents in smaller towns and villages feel that these other closer  urban areas would be a better representative of them in country-wide politics than distant London. Some of these distant communities are nearly 500 miles away from London. That is like Detroit, Michigan being politically and economically dominated by New York City. Even with London being massive in size and influential reach, I can see why far away towns in the U.K. don't always consider London too important.

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Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 11:25 PM

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Little England: What's Left If Scotland Leaves?

Little England: What's Left If Scotland Leaves? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
What is more likely to happen first: Greece will leave the eurozone, or Scotland will leave the UK?

 

Although there is currently only about 30% of Scotland that would support independence, this is something that will be gaining importance.  The United Kingdom is a complex political entity, with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland connected with England.  The "divorce referendum" will be help on October 2014 to see if Scotland wishes to dissolve this union and many of the political and economic events throughout Europe will be seen through this prism, especially the Euro Zone crisis in southern European countries (e.g.-Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal).  The possibility that this might happen are small, but as the article stated, "not zero." 

 

Tags: devolution, supranationalism, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:27 AM

Good for Scotland... as anyone that has watched Braveheart knows, all they need is Mel Gibson to fight for their independence, and they will surely win!  I know some people that play the bagpies, and I like the Scottish music better than much English music.  I don't know much about the UK, so I have little to guide me in favor or against Scotland declaring independence, but aw heck, why not...  The US declared independence, and it seemed to work out for them until... whenever...? forever? it depends on what you use as criteria to look at it...  But live and let live, let people do what they want, the only advice to that is not to let people harm others.  That way, true peace can be achieved.  Harmony, instead of harm.  So I would advocate for Scotland to wear women's clothing with turtle shells in their crotches and dance to celebrate their independence if that's what they want, as long as there are no epic battle sequences that precede or follow their dancing.  Don't be an elitist, open your eyes, the governments own your brothers and their lives... We must work to change this.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 24, 2014 1:42 AM

I had the pleasure of actually meeting a couple from Scotland who was in favor of Scotland's independence. I asked them what they thought would happen to their relationship with England and the rest of the European union.  The woman told me that they were uncertain of what would happen exactly but it would still be worth the shot, that she was willing to risk it to just be Scotland, and the UK because she identified with Scotland.