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Seaweed Farms in South Korea

Seaweed Farms in South Korea | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

The dark squares that make up the checkerboard pattern in this image are fields of a sort—fields of seaweed. Along the south coast of South Korea, seaweed is often grown on ropes, which are held near the surface with buoys. This technique ensures that the seaweed stays close enough to the surface to get enough light during high tide but doesn’t scrape against the bottom during low tide.

The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired this image of seaweed cultivation in the shallow waters around Sisan Island on January 31, 2014. Today, about 90 percent of all the seaweed that humans consume globally is farmed. That may be good for the environment. In comparison to other types of food production, seaweed farming has a light environmental footprint because it does not require fresh water or fertilizer.

 

Tags: South Korea, East Asia,  remote sensing, land use, food, economic, food production, agribusiness.


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 28, 9:47 AM

Yet I wonder: After Fukushima, will seaweed glow in the dark? Are they checking harvested seaweed for radioactive pollution?

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:03 PM

Hate to toot my own horn, but we South Koreans are pretty smart.  :-)  This is a great idea!  I wonder what sea life feeds on seaweed?  Is there a chance for any bacteria to mess with the seaweed?  I wonder if we could do this in other places versus having it imported.  There are heavily populated American cities with a market for Asian food.  But then how does polluted water play a role or high bacteria days?  I certainly feel afraid to eat fish out of the Seekonk.  

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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:15 AM

The statement is true. When the populations of the countries highlighted are combined, 51% of the world’s population lives in the circle. But, this is a claim that could be easily just put out there. We have to look at where the information comes from. In this day and age, it is easy to manipulate numbers, images and ideas. The media has become spin masters.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 9:40 PM

This is a debatable map but I agree that there are more people living in the southeast area of Asia than people living outside of it. However, I also believe that the differentiation in populations is not that far off. I think China is more specific in the southeastern part of Asia because it has the highest population than any other country in the world. Also, Indonesia has the highest Islamic population in the world in comparison to other countries. As an added bonus, all of these countries in southeast Asia such as India, Malaysia, Japan, Taiwan and the Philippines are popular for its increase in manufacturing companies higher than any other region in the world throughout the past century.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2:12 PM

After discussing this picture in class, I know that the statement is true.  I find it incredible that the majority of the world's population lives inside that circle.  I can't even imagine how condense living space must be.  I again am finding myself very fortunate to live where and how I do. 

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Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister

Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Taro Aso says he would refuse end-of-life care and would 'feel bad' knowing treatment was paid for by government

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Greg Hill's curator insight, January 30, 2013 1:17 AM

Tell us how you really feel

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:30 AM

Its clear that Japan is overpopulating. People are living long lives in a big country like Japan and people just keep reproducing. The Japense  minister in my opion is very wrong here. A minister should never wish deaths upon his people.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:11 AM

As populations age and the younger generations have less children the burden of government to provide care for the elderly becomes a big issue.  In countries where the government pays for their health care this will only become a bigger issue.  When the needs of the old and the needs of the young become a conflict what is a country to do?  These issues will only increase as the birth rates of developed countries declines.  

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Korea and the Yellow Sea

Korea and the Yellow Sea | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
While city lights at night serve as a good proxy for population density, North Korea provides a dark exception.

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Amazing photo! Population density is a good issue but also political geography and economic geography as well.

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Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, January 8, 2013 1:14 PM

This image is appears to be a regional inset of the classic Earth at Night composite image however this nighttime remote sensing image was taken from Sept. 2012.  The Earth at Night image is typically used in classrooms to discuss what this actually means for human geography (Population density?  Development? Consumption? Where? How come?).  However, this particular portion of the global image focused on the Korean Peninsula highlights two other specific issues:

the impact of a totalitarian state can actually be seen from space as South Korea has a per captia income level 17 times higher than that of North Korea.  the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) can be seen in the Yellow Sea as fishing vessels form a line approximately 200 nautical miles off the coast of South Korea.     


Tags:  economic, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, territoriality, states, unit 4 political, remote sensing.

서병기's curator insight, November 6, 2014 7:03 PM

We should try to alleviate the great difference of the North and South Korea. It's time to cooperate.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 25, 2014 10:59 AM

The contrast between North and South Korea in this Earth at Night image shows just how different these countries are. South Korea, with aid from the United States, is becoming a highly developed and prosperous power, with a impressive economy compared to what it was just decades ago. On the other hand, North Korea is dark, both literally and figuratively. North Korea's economy remains highly undeveloped, and the few utilities that the country provides are unreliable and not far stretching. The only visible bright light in North Korea is the city of Pyongyang, and even that is nothing compared to Seoul.

 

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Disputed Isles

Disputed Isles | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Competing territorial claims have led to maritime disputes off the coast of Asia. See a map of the islands at issue.

 

This is an nice interactive map that allows the reader to explore current geopolitical conflicts that are about controlling islands.  This is an good source to use when introducing Exclusive Economic Zones, which is often the key strategic importance of small, lightly populated islands.   

 

Tags: EastAsia, SouthEastAsia, political, unit 4 political, territoriality, autonomy, conflict, economic. 


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 2014 6:20 PM

This interactive map discusses the current disputes between the islands and why the land is being disputed. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:40 PM

This interactive page gives relevant information about islands that are disputed over in southeast Asia.  I liked it because you could see the information in context with the map.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:47 PM

This is like a game of Monopoly when people try and get all the houses or businesses. Except this is real life and real isles. Whose is whose? How does Asia decide where and how the EEZ's should be divided.

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In the East China Sea, a Far Bigger Test of Power Looms

In the East China Sea, a Far Bigger Test of Power Looms | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
In an era when the United States has been focused on new forms of conflict, the dangerous contest suddenly erupting in the East China Sea seems almost like a throwback to the Cold War.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:29 PM

There will always be problems with every country. China needs to focus on their new issues and deal with them properly.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:38 PM

There will always be problems with every country. China needs to focus on their new issues and deal with them properly.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:35 PM

As China grows more aggressive in its territorial claims, Japan and South Korea are both adjusting their militaries to fit the situation. Both countries are expanding their military presence throughout the disputed region as they worry about China's expansion. The article states that China may be attempting to push American presence further away from their shores, and explains the increasing tensions between the two.

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East Asia's maritime disputes

East Asia's maritime disputes | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A race for energy resources makes unresolved territorial disputes more dangerous in both North-East and South-East Asia

Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, Japan, East Asia.


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:48 PM

I couldn't view this content. Its "cookies" were unable to read my computer.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:04 PM

Oil resources in the South China Sea are fueling territorial disputes over small islands and territorial waters. China, in order to claim these oil plays for itself, is claiming islands all over the sea. Extending its EEZ will ensure these oil plays. Many of these islands are no more than coral atolls, but China is arguing that they belong to it because of its measures to develop some of these islands. One resort islands and weather stations are being constructed in order to provide some sort of legitimate claim to these places. Also, by claiming these islands and expanding the EEZ, China is trying to claim other countries' EEZs as its own. While China is the powerhouse of the region, many fear that land grabs may turn into military action. 

 

As long as the world is reliant on fossil fuels, territorial disputes will continue and possibly grow in number. Dependency on a non-renewable resource will eventually lead to more regional and global arguments. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, April 12, 3:26 PM

The dispute between The north and South of asia are evident. in a global perspective this territorial battle in somewhat may affect global development as far as trading with the United states. It will affect global interests, and this is why the senator kerry as i recall has made countless trips to help resolve the issues between the two North east and the South to come into an agreement to help because they dont want to loose energy resources and disturb the security that has been provided its a very tough situation.

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Breaking World North Korea News

Breaking World North Korea News | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

World news about North Korea. Breaking news and archival information about its people, politics and economy from The New York Times.

EA: As mentioned in class, North and South Korea would be better off united. By the looks of things, that will not be happening. Scary to think that North Korea is "testing" missiles could endanger its close neighbors. But, maybe that was the intention. I thought a new, younger president would bring a modern way of thinking to North Korea, instead it sounds like they are spiralling downhill. High unemployment, high fuel and food prices. Hopefully South Korea is prepared for any wrongdoing on North Korea's part.... The Peace Dam may keep flooding away, however it is no match for nuclear weapons


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Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute

Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Experts warn that China's apparent claims to other territories could have a long-term impact on relations with its neighbours...

 

Many people assume oftentimes that a map merely reflects reality.  In this passport map, China is flexing it's regional muscles, trying to reinforce their territorial claims as legitimate.  Not surprisingly, their neighbors with competing claims are angered, calling this map dimplomatically "unacceptable."  Some look at this map and dismiss it as a glorified watermark.  What you you think the sub-text this maps is?  You can find another article on this topic in the Washington Post. 

 

Tags: cartography, China, borders.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 25, 2014 1:02 PM


Many people assume oftentimes that a map merely reflects reality.  In this passport map, China is flexing it's regional muscles, trying to reinforce their territorial claims as legitimate.  Not surprisingly, their neighbors with competing claims are angered, calling this map diplomatically "unacceptable."  Some look at this map and dismiss it as a glorified watermark.  What you think the sub-text to this map is?  You can find another article on this topic in the Washington Post


Tags: cartography, China, borders.

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:20 PM

(East Asia topic 3)

This is a prime example of how all maps have a specific purpose for their making. Since all maps are in some form influenced by humans, no map can therefore be purely objective.

What if China's passport map was one of the entire world? It may be a pleasing idea for nationalist supporters, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's accepted as true. The bottom line is that it's not the ink-on-paper picture itself causing the upset as much as it is the somewhat-disguised message being sent through it.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:49 PM

While the inclusion of these islands in their passports might seem like a rather minor thing for the Chinese to have done in fact it carries far greater ramifications. By doing so the Chinese government is sending the message that in considered these areas to be part of China and this might cause tensions with the actual owners. For centuries China avoided colonization and expansion but now it seems they are tempting to make up for lost time in their aggressive claims on land and water. Hopefully this wont lead to any military conflicts in the future. 

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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth