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What Kids Around the World Eat for Breakfast

What Kids Around the World Eat for Breakfast | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
What do kids around the world eat for breakfast? It’s as likely to be coffee or kimchi as it is a sugary cereal.
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Local Greens: A water-smart farm in urban Berkeley

Local Greens: A water-smart farm in urban Berkeley | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Meet Local Greens: an urban farm in northwest Berkeley growing delicious, organic produce and microgreens with barely any water.

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2015, the year of geopolitical upheaval

2015, the year of geopolitical upheaval | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The world could be set for troublesome realignments -- especially in economics -- on a scale not seen since the Cold War

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The Geopolitics of South Asian Political Stability

The Geopolitics of South Asian Political Stability | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A recent essay by Robert Kaplan offers fascinating insight into South Asia's political stability.
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Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 2014 3:31 PM

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 28, 2014 12:57 AM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:49 AM

APHG-Unit 4

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Who Owns The North Pole?

"Though uninhabited and full of melting ice caps, the Arctic is surprisingly an appealing piece of real estate. Many countries have already claimed parts of the region. So who technically owns the North Pole? And why do these nations want it so bad?"


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Great question!  I think we all know the answer...Santa Claus!! ;)

Sammy Shershevsky's curator insight, January 17, 2015 4:57 PM

The video discusses a big topic in discussion today - Who really owns the North Pole? Although the North Pole is uninhabited, many countries have claimed to take ownership of the vast majority of land (or, ice). Canada has already claimed that the North Pole is part of its nation. Russia has put up Russian flags on the North Pole (such as underwater) but does that really make North Pole a Russian territory? The media plays a role in this by offering different opinions on who should and who deserves the right to own the North Pole. You might read a Canadian article that lists all the outright reasons why the North Pole is or deserves to be a Canadian territory. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 7:26 PM

In my opinion, I don't understand how the United nations can be seen as an entity that, essentially, controls who would have rights to a place like the North Pole(technically, not owned by anyone).  I, naively, understand the basics of the U.N.  In short, it is an organization that was formed, post-WW I or II, as a governing board for world-issues.

 

 With that being said, how can they believe that their "law" is the all-powerful one?  If I'm a leader of a country who is not a member of the U.N., do I really care what they say?   I just find it odd that this narrator speaks about the issue while holding the U.N. as a supreme authority.  I know that this video is just a quick fun type of video but it leaves me with wanting to hear the perspective of a non-U.N. member.  But a very interesting topic, none the less.

 

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Women & Agriculture

"In this Feed the Future video, narrator Matt Damon discusses the importance of increasing food production around the world and notes the importance of equipping women with the right tools, training, and  technology to see as much as a 30 percent increase in food production. To feed our growing population we need to increase food production by 70 percent before 2050. Women make up the majority of the agricultural workforce in many areas of the world."


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AckerbauHalle's curator insight, December 23, 2014 12:37 AM

Für die zukünftige Ernährung der Welt gibt es einen oft übersehenen Faktor: Gleichberechtigung von Frauen. Frauen sind in vielen Ländern für die Arbeit auf den Feldern verantwortlich. Gleichzeitig haben sie keine Rechte am Land und sind schlecht ausgebildet und - wenn überhaupt - schlecht bezahlt. 

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 19, 2015 4:50 PM

Unit 5: Agriculture, Food Production and Rural Land Use 

 

This video is about how women make up the majority of the agricultural workforce and that giving them access to land, water, markets, and technology could increase food production by 30%. This in return would help boost the economy. Places such as Kenya have given women the same resources as men and have seen a 22% increase in crop production. In Brazil, programs targeting women in agriculture have helped cut the population in extreme poverty by half and malnutrition by 73%. This video encourages people around the world to help give women the resources they need in order to increase the food production and economy. 

 

This relates to unit 5 because it deals with agriculture and particularly women's roles in agriculture. This video explains how increased resources can help end world hunger. Women are not given as much opportunity as men and this video expresses need to invest in women's rights. 

mary jane james's curator insight, January 12, 8:11 PM

This article relates to my topics development and agriculture by showing how important it is that how equipping women with the right tool can make so much more food and how other countries should accept women and give them rights. Just like the video states women make up a majority of the world and countries need to take that advantage. Just like the video states women make up a majority of the world and countries need to take that advantage. Sooner or later the population will take over how much food we make, even with new technology we still might not make it fast enough or enough to support life on earth. The video states that we need to increase food production to 70% by 2050

 

 In my opinion, this video really does touch base with how women are treated today in modern society and how they can become a really big impact on our food production if only they had the access to the same resources as men do. Then maybe we might have a chance to reach the goal what we need to in 2050.

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How the Global Population Boom Really Began

How the Global Population Boom Really Began | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The Industrial Revolution gets credit for kicking off the world's human population explosion, but new research suggests we should look further back.

 

“If you dig further in the past," Stutz told Emory University, "the data suggest that a critical threshold of political and economic organization set the stage around the start of the Common Era. The resulting political-economic balance was the tipping point for economies of scale: It created a range of opportunities enabling more people to get resources, form successful families, and generate enough capital to transfer to the next generation.”


Tag: population.


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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, January 3, 2015 7:29 PM

Homo Sapiens evolved around 130,000 to 160,000 ago, so why did it take until 1804 to reach 1 billion and only 195 years to reach 6 billion? The Industrial Revolution is usually agreed upon as the major catalyst for this population boom. However, WHY is the Industrial Revolution given credit for the population boom and  what else could have caused this? Population growth began with cities which in this case refers to any sort of settlement. Food surplus allows for people to do other things than hunt and gather. This allowed  for the creation of population centers, society, hegemonic class systems, and the economy.  As long as their was a food surplus there could be a population surplus. So the better people were at getting/making food, the more the population grew. So the population boom could actually be attributed to the ability to create a food surplus. The agriculture revolution spured this allowing for the domestication of farm animals and primitive  farming equipment. The population to continue to grow. The industrial revolution made these technologies many times better. This allowed for a greater food surplus resulting in a stronger economy  and standard of living which ALL results in ... A FASTER GROWING POPULATION.

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Scenes From the Slaughterhouse - Modern Farmer

Scenes From the Slaughterhouse - Modern Farmer | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Photographs of humane pig operations.
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Who Owns The North Pole?

"Though uninhabited and full of melting ice caps, the Arctic is surprisingly an appealing piece of real estate. Many countries have already claimed parts of the region. So who technically owns the North Pole? And why do these nations want it so bad?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Great question!  I think we all know the answer...Santa Claus!! ;)

Sammy Shershevsky's curator insight, January 17, 2015 4:57 PM

The video discusses a big topic in discussion today - Who really owns the North Pole? Although the North Pole is uninhabited, many countries have claimed to take ownership of the vast majority of land (or, ice). Canada has already claimed that the North Pole is part of its nation. Russia has put up Russian flags on the North Pole (such as underwater) but does that really make North Pole a Russian territory? The media plays a role in this by offering different opinions on who should and who deserves the right to own the North Pole. You might read a Canadian article that lists all the outright reasons why the North Pole is or deserves to be a Canadian territory. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 7:26 PM

In my opinion, I don't understand how the United nations can be seen as an entity that, essentially, controls who would have rights to a place like the North Pole(technically, not owned by anyone).  I, naively, understand the basics of the U.N.  In short, it is an organization that was formed, post-WW I or II, as a governing board for world-issues.

 

 With that being said, how can they believe that their "law" is the all-powerful one?  If I'm a leader of a country who is not a member of the U.N., do I really care what they say?   I just find it odd that this narrator speaks about the issue while holding the U.N. as a supreme authority.  I know that this video is just a quick fun type of video but it leaves me with wanting to hear the perspective of a non-U.N. member.  But a very interesting topic, none the less.

 

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This Mysterious Twitter User Predicts Turkish Government Crackdowns

This Mysterious Twitter User Predicts Turkish Government Crackdowns | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
On Saturday night, journalists at Turkey's highest-circulation newspaper, Zaman, gathered at their offices and waited to be arrested. Some even filed stories on their surreal…
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The Economist offers authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
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Inside Beijing's airpocalypse – a city made 'almost uninhabitable' by pollution

Inside Beijing's airpocalypse – a city made 'almost uninhabitable' by pollution | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The 21 million inhabitants of China’s capital appear to be engaged in a city-wide rehearsal for life on an inhospitable planet. Oliver Wainwright reports from Beijing
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Syria threatened by food insecurity

Syria threatened by food insecurity | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The Syrian agricultural sector is deteriorating at an increasing rate. Destructive conditions over the past four years suggest that Syria may soon be hit by a wall of food insecurity. This disaster is even more tragic because Syria was once described as the “breadbasket of Rome” due to its production of grain, especially wheat. Until recently, Syria was working diligently to achieve self-sufficiency and food security. Before the outbreak of the country’s recent tragedy, Syria was considered an agricultural country, as the industry accounted for nearly 24% of its GNP.

Via CIMMYT, Int., Alan Yoshioka
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A Bamboo Tower That Produces Water From Air | WIRED

A Bamboo Tower That Produces Water From Air | WIRED | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The structure is designed to wring water out of thin air, providing a sustainable source of H2O for developing countries.

Via Alan Yoshioka
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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, January 10, 2015 9:48 PM

La torre WarkaWater es una estructura poco probable encontrar que sobresale del paisaje etíope. A los 30 metros de altura y 13 metros de ancho, no es un medio tan grande como su árbol del mismo nombre (que puede vislumbrarse 75 pies de altura), pero es llamativo, no obstante. La torre larguirucho, de bambú celosía forrada con malla de poliéster de color naranja, no es arte, aunque sí especie de lo parece. Más bien, la estructura está diseñada para escurrir el agua fuera del aire, proporcionando una fuente sostenible de H2O para los países en desarrollo.

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A Geographical Oddity


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 10, 2015 1:39 PM

Partly just because I love this highly quotable movie with an incredible soundtrack, but this short clip from O Brother Where Art Thou? can start be a good conversation starter.  I'm hoping to use it when discussing relative location (or isolation) as well as the time-space compression.  Frequently, I ask my student how far away they live from campus and invariably they answer with a unit of time (even though distance was implied in the question). 


Questions to Ponder: Why do we often answer with a measurement of time when discussing distance?  What technologies are dependent on our temporal analysis of distance? How would our perception of distance change based on our access to transportation and communication technologies?


Tags: Time-Space Compression, location.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:34 AM

Why do we answer with a unit of time when asked a distance question?

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In the East China Sea, a Far Bigger Test of Power Looms

In the East China Sea, a Far Bigger Test of Power Looms | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
In an era when the United States has been focused on new forms of conflict, the dangerous contest suddenly erupting in the East China Sea seems almost like a throwback to the Cold War.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:38 PM

There will always be problems with every country. China needs to focus on their new issues and deal with them properly.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:35 PM

As China grows more aggressive in its territorial claims, Japan and South Korea are both adjusting their militaries to fit the situation. Both countries are expanding their military presence throughout the disputed region as they worry about China's expansion. The article states that China may be attempting to push American presence further away from their shores, and explains the increasing tensions between the two.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 8:32 PM

I understand that the united states has been the most powerful country in the world for the last 100 or so years and that china was not so powerful. But now china thinks it is time to grow and can do so because of its great economic situation and its building of military. China has rapidly moved up the ranks in these two titles and finally they want to show the world how powerful it got. i don't know what happens in the future but china knows it got America nervous though we would never admit it. 

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How New Countries Gain Independence

"Secession movements seem to be everywhere: from the Kurds in Iraq, to pro-Russian Ukrainian separatists, to Scotland's aim to break up the UK. How does secession actually happen? Let's look back to South Sudan's successful secession effort to see exactly how new countries gain independence."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 26, 2014 2:53 PM

What does it take to actually secede from a country?  This video takes the example of South Sudan to highlight the necessary requirements to successfully secede and then gain full independence. 


Tags: South Sudanpolitical, sovereignty, Africastates, unit 4 political.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:27 AM

How New Countries Gain Independence

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 23, 2015 7:06 PM

For a region to be able to succeed as an independent country, it must fulfill a series of requirements. In the case of Catalonia, Spain, it is far from what citizens in that area want to pursue, even when Catalonia is one of the richer regions in Spain. There are many factors that inhibit Catalonia from achieving its status as an independent country such as economic, political and cultural issues. With Spain’s current economy, it would be almost impossible for Catalonia to support itself as its own nation. In addition, if Catalonia gains its independence from Spain, it would not be able to be a part of the United Nations (UN). Language would prove as another obstacle for Catalonia as their combination of French and Spanish is not the official dialect of the region. Cultural assimilation would be difficult as Catalonians would have to transition and adapt Spain’s vascos and gallegos to a version of their own. However, centripetal forces in Catalonian citizens unify them as strong communicators within their region in order for them to promote and retain their distinct cultural identity.

As the video emphasizes how to gain independence; Catalonia does not qualify to achieve independence as it fails to meet some of the characteristics such as an “established group, marginalization, [and] economic stability.” However, as Spain’s economy begins to weaken, Catalonian citizens can take this opportunity to work towards their goal as being an independent entity from Spain

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Mapping World Religions


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:17 PM

This was a nice video of good length that allowed me to see how the world is broke up into different regions. I know that religion is a main factor of how places are divided and so I thought this video was a nice visualization of that. The map with the timeline was nice to have and I liked how it gave us an estimate of how many people are following each religion today. The video also helped me see how religion can be a main factor in defining world regions.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:26 PM

In this video we are able to see the growth and fall of religions. It was quite fascinating to see the number of people in each religion and where in the world the spread. I thought it was helpful to see the dates of events that either caused spread or destruction of religions . For example the birth of Muhammad and the Crusades. THis shows the spatial distribution of religion. 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:58 AM

This video puts world religions in a more basic form. Shows the patterns that religions take on a global scale, outlining the most prominent and least prominent throughout the world. 

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The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite

The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Many urban neighborhoods are places of concentrated poverty, and it's killing opportunity in the US.

 

American cities are growing, and as they grow, they're adding lots of high-poverty neighborhoods. Nearly three times as many "high-poverty" census tracts existed in 2010 as in 1970.  That's unsettling on its face but even more so when you see the havoc a poor neighborhood can wreak on a resident's chances at a good life. Forget gentrification — this is a bigger problem. 

 

The chart above tallies up the people living in these neighborhoods in 1970 and 2010. What it shows is that the number of people living in high-poverty neighborhoods — those with poverty rates of 30 percent or more — has roughly doubled since 1970. That's because these neighborhoods of concentrated poverty have a tendency to stay that way, even while new ones sprout up.

 

Tags: urban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


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French scallops cleaned in China then sent back

French scallops cleaned in China then sent back | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Scallops pulled out of the waters off the western coast of France are taken on an incredible journey that sees them shipped off to China to be cleaned, before being sent all the way back to France to be cooked up. Producers say its worth the cost.

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 22, 2015 6:50 PM

this is crazy

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:03 PM

This makes absolutely no sense to me.  How does the freshness of the scallop even last a trip like this?  What is the transportation time back and forth? 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:40 PM

This type of nonsense only makes sense in a world where the bottom dollar is the only way to way to evaluate decisions.  However, resource conservation (think of the food miles!), fair labor prices, and the preservation of local cultural economies are certainly issues that should be considered. 

 

 

Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalization, food production, agribusiness, agriculture.

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A Tweet On Women's Veils, Followed By Raging Debate In Saudi Arabia

A Tweet On Women's Veils, Followed By Raging Debate In Saudi Arabia | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A prominent ultra-conservative figure says face veils for women are not mandatory. Now everyone is weighing in on the hottest topic in the kingdom.
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The case for open borders

The case for open borders | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
We wouldn't stand for a system that barred people from work based on race, gender, or sexual orientation. George Mason's Bryan Caplan asks why discrimination based on place of birth is any different.
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Why Does Earth Have Deserts?


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Catherine Buckman's curator insight, December 16, 2014 2:22 PM

Interesting short video  explaining Hadley Cells and why the earth rain forests on Equator and deserts above and below. 

Gordon de Snoo's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:05 PM

Good explaination

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 28, 2015 10:27 PM

Deserts are pretty much important for bringing warm air towards the equator which cools and causes rain to form rain forests. As the cool air hits the stratosphere, it warms up again because of it's hot temperature and it spreads throughout the stratosphere 30 degrees north and 30 degrees south in latitude from the equator. When it dries, it lowers back to earth forming a dry desert. I now notice that there are no deserts along the equator and there are rain forests pretty much along the equator. The Hadley Cells are pretty much like cycles allowing rain forests and deserts to occur.