Haak's APHG
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Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World?

Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"A photo gallery of the world's ten smallest countries, from 0.2 square miles on up to 115 square miles, these ten smallest countries are microstates."


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Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, March 23, 2015 2:41 AM

This picture slide show has to do with microstates, which are states or terratories that are both small in population and in size. These microstates are mostly near the sea, or even islands. Microstates have both pros and cons. Pros include having an abundant buffer zone: the sea. Another pro would be being alone, or isolated, (sometimes) this makes them free from other countries, which can be a pro and a con. A con may be that the country may have a harder time accessing fresh water, and improving agriculture with little land. Unit 4 deals with Microstates. 

 

Microstates are discussed in Unit 4, and all of these are examples of Microstates. Microstates have many pros and cons listed above.

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:53 AM

Pitcairn Island

Vatican City

Sovereign Military Order of Malta

San Marino

Monaco

Andorra

South Ossetia

Singapore

Transdniesteia

Bahrain

 

Just a few guesses...

 

Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 23, 2015 4:35 PM

This shows that the world is made up of several countries of different origins. people on this small island nation could have lived there for centuries. this is a goodway to show how diverse the world is.

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First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga

First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

The first photographs have emerged of a newly formed volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean after three men climbed to the peak of the land mass off the coast of Tonga. Experts believe a volcano exploded underwater and then expanded until an island formed. The island is expected to erode back into the ocean in a matter of months.


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:17 AM

A new one mile island of the coast of Tonga in Oceania west coast of Australia. A volcano exploded underwater, turning lava in rock and pushing through the surface of the ocean to expose a new island. Three men have scaled the peak of the mountain to date. The men say the surface was still hot and the green lake in the crater smelt strongly of sulfur.

                This is great example of geography constantly undergoing changes and new looks and features. Officials say that this island will be eroded away within the next month so they will not even name it I wonder how many islands like this has happened to, or if inhabitants went to live there then the next day there home is underwater. This is another great example of plate tectonic and active under sea forces that we do not see with our eyes, and what most people do not think of on a daily basis, but is working on a daily basis, constantly changing geography and our world. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 9:34 PM

I just find this fascinating.  History is excellent to study but so is the watching history in the making.  This volcanic island formation off the coast of Tonga is a modern day phenomenon which will one day be history.  Some people predict it will erode back into the water but some others think it will be able to last longer.  Either way stuff like this is pretty cool to watch and study while it is happening before your very own eyes.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:20 PM

This is pretty cool that a new island is being formed, due to a volcano that erupted under water. I am sure there are many more in other places, but it is a new opportunity for life, development and travel. Although since it is new, obviously now would not be a good time because you do not want a volcano erupting on people, that would not be an ideal situation. Although, I hope to one day be able to travel to this new island to check it out. 

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'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste

'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

In the 19th century, London was the capital of the largest empire the world had ever known — and it was infamously filthy. It had choking, sooty fogs; the Thames River was thick with human sewage; and the streets were covered with mud.  But according to Lee Jackson, author of Dirty Old London: The Victorian Fight Against Filth, mud was actually a euphemism. 'It was essentially composed of horse dung,' he tells Fresh Air's Sam Briger. 'There were tens of thousands of working horses in London [with] inevitable consequences for the streets. And the Victorians never really found an effective way of removing that, unfortunately.'"


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Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:03 PM

London has come a far way from the industrial town it was in the 19th century, and is now cleaner than ever. But pollution led to many issues in London at the time. This is also evident in the developing world today, such as in China, Africa, and South America.

EuroHistoireGeoAmiens's curator insight, April 11, 2015 10:16 AM

Pas mal en première pour une étude détaillée du Londres de Dickens

Emily Bian's curator insight, May 23, 2015 11:41 AM

This article is about London, UK during the time of Industrial Revolution. The city of London expanded so rapidly, that there wasn't enough time for urban planning. Factories and houses were going up everywhere, and thousands of people migrated to London for jobs. This led to an influx of filth. The air was polluted and there wasn't adequate irrigation systems or waste systems. Everything dirty could be found on the streets like horse dung, and the water would get polluted and unsanitary. 

I liked this article, because it really created an image in my head how terrible and filthy the Industrial Revolution was at the start. 

7)Development and character of cities

Development and character of cities

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Urbanization Will Change The (Developing) World - Forbes

Urbanization Will Change The (Developing) World - Forbes | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
For the first time in history more than half the world’s population resides in cities. The world’s urban population now stands at 3.7 billion people, and this number is expected to double by 2050.
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Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 1:25 PM

Summary: This article mostly discusses how much the recent boom in urbanization has affected developing and developed countries alike. Urbanization has had a really large affect on countries in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. Even though most people don't live in cities in Africa, an astounding amount of the GDP comes from the small percentage of those living in cities over rural communities. This article also discussed how urbanization has the potential to provide more resources to those in a relatively concentrated area, making it a lot more efficient. But high concentrations of people can also be a problem if the right infrastructure isn't in place. A city may not be able to sustain itself if there are too many people in place with the infrastructure available. 

 

Insight: This article states that the main force driving urbanization is economic advantages. With more people clustered together comes more opportunity and available resources, which makes it a lot easier for a strong economy to develop. We could also see this in Kenya, where only 9% of the population lives in Nairobi, but 20% of the GDP comes out of that city alone. 

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Rapid coastal population growth may leave many exposed to sea-level rise

Rapid coastal population growth may leave many exposed to sea-level rise | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The number of people potentially exposed to future sea level rise and associated storm surge flooding may be highest in low-elevation coastal zones in Asia and Africa.
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The Ride of Their Lives

The Ride of Their Lives | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
At a time of urbanization and connectivity, rodeo and ranching may seem anachronistic, but to the Wright family, they represent the present and the future.
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Mass Deaths in Americas Start New CO2 Epoch

Mass Deaths in Americas Start New CO2 Epoch | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A new proposal pegs the start of the Anthropocene to the Little Ice Age and the Columbian Exchange
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This is what 20 years of gender equality progress looks like - Mashable

This is what 20 years of gender equality progress looks like - Mashable | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A girl's chances of receiving an education, enjoying a constitutional right to equality and living longer have increased considerably.
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Can we build power plants that actually take carbon dioxide out of the air?

A new study shows how California might be able to go carbon-negative using futuristic biomass plants.
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WWII ‘Mapping Maidens’ Chart Course for Today’s Mapmakers

WWII ‘Mapping Maidens’ Chart Course for Today’s Mapmakers | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"As the demand for its products escalated early in World War II, the Army Map Service, a heritage organization of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, was losing much of its largely male workforce to the armed forces. A solution to the urgent need for replacements emerged when the University of Chicago’s Geography Department developed a course in military map making and began offering it to women’s colleges in the East and Midwest."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 2015 11:19 AM

Women in science are awesome and we need to encourage girls in STEM disciplines, especially geospatial technologies...hearing this story of women in the past might help to inspire a future generation. 


Tags: mapping, cartographywar, gender, STEM, geospatial.

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 2015 2:19 AM

I believe this article is very empowering for women around the world. It showed how in this time of trouble in America we took into account the women's workforce and started using it. This article shows how much women helped by making the maps for the male army that was off at war. This story should empower women int their fight for equality and inspire them.

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
By Seth Dixon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography, Rhode Island College  Food. It's something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Ge...
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GeoFRED lesson

GeoFRED lesson | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Creating and Analyzing a Binary Map: This online activity demonstrates how easy it is to master key functions in GeoFRED.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2015 3:11 PM

Last month I wrote an article about how to use GeoFRED for the National Geographic Education blog.  Since then, GeoFRED was produced this lesson plan that will walk students through the basics of how to use the site and introductory mapping skills.


Tags: development, statistics,  economic, mapping.

Cass Allan's curator insight, March 1, 2015 2:23 AM

fun with binary maps. statistical data. figure it out

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The Global Cities That Power the World Economy Now

The Global Cities That Power the World Economy Now | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The latest numbers from the Brookings Institution are a reminder that inequality has a geographic dimension.

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40 maps that explain the world

40 maps that explain the world | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Visualizing everything from the spread of religion to the most racially tolerant countries to the world's writing systems.
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Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:02 PM

Summary:  This article displays many maps that analyze population on a broad scale.  Among the most interesting were maps analyzing how welcoming a country's citizens are.  

 

Insight:  This series of maps has a lot to do with what we learned in Unit 2.  They are collections of data spatially analyzing populations.  So, basically all we did in Unit 2.

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, March 25, 2015 8:48 AM

enlightening

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Why the side-hustle is key to Nigeria's economy

Nkem Ifejika meets with Nigerian entrepreneurs who show how the nation's economy is finding lubricants other than oil.

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Rowena Spence Cortina's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:37 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 14, 2015 9:11 AM

unit 6

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:12 AM

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy. 


Tags: economic, labor, Nigeria, podcast, 

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Retailers accused of labour abuses

Retailers accused of labour abuses | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A Human Rights Watch report uncovers alleged abuses at Cambodian garment factories supplying Marks & Spencer, Gap, H&M, Adidas and Armani.
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Modi bets on GM crops for India's second green revolution

Modi bets on GM crops for India's second green revolution | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
NEW DELHI (Reuters) - On a fenced plot not far from Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's home, a field of mustard is in full yellow bloom, representing his government's reversal of an effective ban on...

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Megan Becker's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:38 PM

Summery: This article discusses the new agricultural practices in India to feed its growing population. It's being called the "Second Green Revolution", the challenge being to replicate GMOs in the growing demand for edible oils and vegetables. 

 

Insight: This articles view on the growing agribusiness is incredibly original and insightful. India's growing population can't be supported without the use of GMOs, and their "Second Green Revolution" is just the way to solve that problem. 

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:34 AM

I. A mustard field is in being grown in India. This field represents the government's reversal of an effective ban on field trials of genetically modified organisms. Prime Minister Modi supported the use of genetically modified crops, especially with India’s cotton harvest. However, grassroots groups associated with Modi's Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) have opposed GM crops because of the reliance on seeds patented by multinationals.

 

II. To a great extent farming India got to be independent in foodgrains after the dispatch of the Green Revolution in the 1960s, when it presented high-yielding seed assortments and the utilization of compost and watering system.The test now is to duplicate that achievement in eatable oils and vegetables, which are progressively sought after.

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:05 PM

Summary: This article talks about the recent implementation of trial fields of genetically modified crops in India. They had been previously banned due to the fear of loss of biodiversity and food safety. But recently, India has been losing a lot of their arable land to urbanization, and with farm production decreasing, using genetically modified crops, or GM crops, seemed to be the only option. This, paired with their extraordinary population growth, India's crop production wouldn't have been able to sustain their growing population. 

 

Insight: This article discusses the introduction of biotechnology, specifically GM crops, into India's current agricultural industry. This introduction, although riddled with fear of loss of food safety and biodiversity, could potentially really help India handle feeding their quickly-growing population.

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Dot Earth | Did Earth's 'Anthropocene' Age of Man Begin With the Globalization ... - New York Times (blog)

Dot Earth | Did Earth's 'Anthropocene' Age of Man Begin With the Globalization ... - New York Times (blog) | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Scientists propose that Earth’s “age of humans,” the Anthropocene, began with the spread of disease in the Americas.
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Can Nairobi And Its One-Of-A-Kind National Park Continue To Coexist?

Can Nairobi And Its One-Of-A-Kind National Park Continue To Coexist? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
NAIROBI — The sun feels even more scorching under the cap of pollution.
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Scientists map unprecedented urbanization in East-Southeast Asia

Scientists map unprecedented urbanization in East-Southeast Asia | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Researchers have, for the first time, mapped the rapid urban expansion that has occurred across the whole of East-Southeast Asia in the last decade.

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Nepal steps up safe pesticide use

Nepal steps up safe pesticide use | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Nepal’s safe pesticide use programme now includes training for vendors who deal with farmers.
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Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 18, 2015 11:18 PM

Unit 5 Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use


This article is about Nepal's unsafe pesticide use and storage and the governments encouragement for safer and minimal use of pesticides. They include an effective training programs for vendors and others who deal with farmers. A study, published in the Annals of Plant Protection Sciences in September 2014, showed vendors using inadequate technical knowledge of pesticides. Farmers were found exposing themselves to toxic pesticides by not following basic handling guidelines, and study showed 44 per cent of farmers interviewed storing pesticides in their homes. Customers were also being exposed to pesticide residue from failure to observe the required "waiting period" between spraying and harvesting. Sharma’s training programs for vendors covers laws and regulations, WHO classifications, commercial terminology, environmental and health impacts, field research on retail practices, impact on crop-friendly insects and expiration dates of pesticides.  


This relates to unit 5 because it covers agriculture and the use of pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill or repel any plant or animal that is considered a pest. The use of pesticides has also lead to environmental and health hazard. The Nepal government is pushing for farmers to use safe procedures when dealing with pesticides, but ultimately pushing for minimal use. 



Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:25 PM

Summary: As Nepal incorporated the use of pesticides and herbicides into their agriculture, they started becoming sick and it was getting to be unsafe to handle the pesticides because it had a really bad effect on those using it, and anyone else exposed to them, as well as the environment exposed to the pesticides. Now, the country of Nepal is promoting safer and minimal use of pesticides, by training those handling them to use the least that they can, and by using safer methods. They hope that this can have a positive effect on every single farm in Nepal, making it a lot safer for everyone in general. 

 

Insight: This article talked about the environmental issues that were caused by the pesticides being used, which can include water pollution, and the excessive use of pesticides leading to super pests, as well as loss of biodiversity in the surrounding environment. These are all environmental issues that can come from the excessive use of pesticides, and with Nepal decreasing their use and increasing their safety of the pesticides, the general condition of the surrounding environment will also go up. 

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Aerospace manufacturing takes off in South

Aerospace manufacturing takes off in South | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Region attracting some of the biggest names in aviation, including Boeing and Airbus.

 

The South is home to auto giants Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen and Nissan Motor Co. It is increasingly attracting some of the biggest names in aviation, including Boeing Co. in South Carolina, Airbus in Alabama, Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. in Georgia and GE Aviation in North Carolina.

Aerospace companies are taking a cue from the auto industry and moving their manufacturing operations to Southern states. The region's lower costs, generous state incentive packages and right-to-work laws that make it hard for unions to organize are motivating these companies to choose the South.


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Mr. Gresham's curator insight, April 10, 2014 7:59 AM

Here is an example of what was covered last unit.  As your reading think about what forces pulled those companies to the south.

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The Geographic Advantage

The Geographic Advantage | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
We are living in an era of receding glaciers, accelerating loss of species habitat, unprecedented population migration, growing inequalities within and between nations, rising concerns over resource depletion, and shifting patterns of interaction and identity. This website provides 11 geographic investigations aligned to the geographic questions in the NRC Understanding Our Changing Planet report. The report focuses on the future directions in the geographical sciences and how these key questions will guide research to help us understand the planet on which we live.

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Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 20, 2015 6:17 PM

This article by the AAG emphasizes that in order to provide a healthier, more prospering world, we need to do 4 things. These 4 things are: environmental change, promote sustainability, spatial reorganization of the economy and society, and harness technological change. This will allow us to create more long term and sustainable geographic patterns. 

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:02 PM

I really liked this article as it was interactive. I was able to pick out the area of geography I wanted to learn about and then it took me to another page that gave me more in-depth explanations. It was an overall good refresher on different aspects of geography with emphasis on how we react with our environment. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:22 AM

I definitely agree with the website that geography is one of the most important, if not the most important tool in understanding the world today. Geography is not simply just naming and understanding place names, although that is certainly important to geography. Geography is about understanding the social, political, and economic causes and consequences resulting from the nationally and artificially conceived barriers, borders, and places. This is why I think everyone should be required to take AP Human Geography. The classes exposes you to so many of the current events, problems, and implication in society today. As a senior, I thought I had already learned everything I needed to learn in my previous classes, and little did I know that I was dead wrong in my assumption. This classes has singlehandedly taught me many of the problems in the world today, and this class is the most useful class I've ever taken that can be applied to the real world every single day. I'm beyond happy that I chose to take AP Human Geography. I'm grateful for all the information I've learned in this class. But most importantly, I'm most thankful for the endless curiosity this classes has sparked in me to understand the world around me.

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Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Some four decades after welcoming foreign assembly plants and factories, known as maquiladoras, Mexico has seen only a trickle of its industrial and factory workers join the ranks of those who even slightly resemble a middle class.

 

Despite making such consumer goods like BlackBerry smartphones, plasma TVs, appliances and cars that most people in the US, for instance, consider necessities, Mexican workers in these factories seldom get to enjoy these items because, as this article argues, the labor system keeps them in poverty.  Foreign investment in these businesses keep unions out and attracts workers from poorer areas, allowing low-cost labor to prevail.  Less than $8 a day is the going wage - great for the bottom line and consumer prices but very bleak for those who toil in this system.


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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:26 PM

This article talks about how the maquiladora labor system dosen't provide enough money for it's workers. Many in Mexico are living in poverty and can't afford much more than dinner because of their low wages.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:47 PM

The labor system keeps workers in Poverty. This is the argument that is transitioned by stating the fact that many factory workers are and will always remian in poverty if they have no oppurtunity to move up in the food chain and become educated in order to get themselves out of poverty. They need different skills in order to aquire a better job to create a better life.  

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:33 PM

Its a very sad situation reading this. Seeing people go through all this to just survive. Kids don't even get any education and follow their parents footsteps to work at a plant just to be able to pay for bills. 8 dollars a day, and you wonder why they try to run to united states. Its very unfortunate that a lot of people go through this and i hope it changes soon, because to see that this is going on makes me thankful for what i have around me. Foreign investors are not great as they set out to be take advantage of the poor and get rich out of it, i think its pretty ridiculous.